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Evan
12-20-2006, 02:12 PM
I just spoke to my friend who is the metalshop teacher at the local senior high school. I explained that I would be closing my business and would like to help out at the school in his shop. I think I made his day as he still has a lot to do to recover from the huge fire a couple of years ago and can use all the help he can get.

I also told him I would be interested in substitute teaching for him on the official sub list. I will have no problem being approved for that as I used to teach night school for the college here as well as about five years as a civilian instructor for the local Sea Cadets. I have also been involved in the high school work experience program over the last six years or so and have help qualify a number of students to graduate. That means I have experience teaching teenagers and have the necessary legal clearances already for dealing with young adults.

I can't think of anything I would like to do more in my spare time than to teach metalwork to the kids at the high school and actually get paid for it too at times. I'll even do it for free. Dave sounds like he can't wait to get me in his shop. I sure am looking forward to it. They even have CNC trainers.

mochinist
12-20-2006, 02:27 PM
Do some online research of metal pipes sold to smoke "tobacco" out of.:rolleyes: When I was in HS metal shop my teacher was quite naive to stuff like pipes and weapons, and we made all of the above. Have fun

Evan
12-20-2006, 03:03 PM
I grew up in Bezerkely. I am quite familiar with all the possible variations of paraphernalia, everything from aluminum foil on a hole in a toilet paper tube to a hot knife held over a candle for hash inhaled with a straw. If I see it I will know what it is. At one time in my distant past I had quite a few friends in low places.

Your Old Dog
12-20-2006, 04:00 PM
Evan, I hope this won't count against you but do they know you hang out here on the forum? :D :D

Evan
12-20-2006, 04:14 PM
I hope not. :rolleyes:

speedsport
12-20-2006, 04:21 PM
does this mean you will be required to clean up your act?, and shave?

Alistair Hosie
12-20-2006, 04:25 PM
Evan does this mean you need to smarten up and shave get a haircut and wear a tie man I'd pay good Scottish money to see that wearing your sunday best suit :DAlistair

Tinkerer
12-20-2006, 04:34 PM
Rule #1 NO TIES in a machine shop. :eek:
Rule # 2 Amendment to rule #1.. unless it's a bow tie that spins and flashes. :D

Have fun at it and no need to spiff up... just wear that Eric the Red outfit... they'll mind quite well. ;)

Evan
12-20-2006, 04:48 PM
I'll just treat them like the cadets...

TENNN HUT! Officer on the deck!

I don't see any problems dealing with the teenagers. They will try and BS you at first but when they realize that it doesn't work they will behave quite well. If there are any hard cases they get turfed out. Knowing Dave I won't need to do that. I have quite a few classrom hours with teenagers including instructing marksmanship where range safety is the absolute first priority.

pcarpenter
12-20-2006, 05:08 PM
Evan-- congratulations on your retirement and your new venture! You are to be commended for volunteering like that.

I would love to win the lottery and retire and do some of the things I love to do as well as volunteer my services instead of having to work for a living.

Metal shop programs keep disappearing. I volunteered locally with a guy running a program at a local high school after I scavenged some equipment they were scrapping. I figured it was a way to pay them back for equipment they could not officially give me. The fellow there is a welder by trade. They have 6 hours a day of welding classes because they are so popular and the metalworking machines are not getting used at all....no time or room to share space with welding classes at this point. I did take a day during the summer and helped the instructor move a mill and several other machines for a more optimal layout. Still, they lack the space to weld much less have both machining and welding classes going on simultaneously. The instructor is not that experienced in machine tools either, so they just don't offer the classes any more. I get some "consulting time" here at my day job...but not enough to volunteer to teach a regular class off site.

I just hate to see these skills go by the way side as the pendulum always swings. No one is training machinists. For a decade or two the presumption has been that a machine operator would be a button pusher. Still, there are some needs for true machinists...or more importantly toolmaker types. The old timers with that skillset are retired or will retire shortly. With no one around apprenticing under the great masters, the knowledge transfer stops. Where do companies go now for those skills? The pendulum will likely swing the other direction....jobs with no trained workers, and no schools to start young people in that trade at an early age.

I wish you a happy retirement and success in getting young people interested in metalworking.

Paul

MikeG
12-20-2006, 05:10 PM
We don't have any school metalshops left in the USA. What a travisty!

MikeG

Lew Hartswick
12-20-2006, 05:25 PM
We don't have any school metalshops left in the USA. What a travisty!

MikeG

Speak for you own school system. :-) The Albuquerque PS has a very good
metal shop program at Valley High.
...lew...