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View Full Version : OT- AVG 7.1 Gone?



rws
12-28-2006, 07:06 PM
I got a message that AVG 7.1 will end 15 Jan. They are promoting 7.5, for a fee. Will they not offer a free sevice any longer?

halac
12-28-2006, 07:20 PM
You can upgrade to AVG 7.5 for free. I did so a couple of weeks ago. Just follow the links within their web site.

mochinist
12-28-2006, 07:37 PM
They kinda hide the link towards the bottom of the page, it is there if you look.

dewat
12-28-2006, 10:38 PM
I got the new one a couple of weeks ago seems to work better than the old one , they also have a free anti-spyware, gets automatically updated just like the virus program.

Paul_NJ
12-28-2006, 11:56 PM
May not apply to you, but AVG no longer supports Windows 98 SE on the free 7.5 version, which unfortunately one of my computers still runs. (I hated the Windows ME it came with so much I reverse upgraded. Guess it's time to move to XP. . . . )

rockrat
12-29-2006, 12:27 AM
If your having trouble finding it (which I was) here is a link.

http://free.grisoft.com/doc/1

I just installed and it seems to be running fine.
But they are making it harder to get the free stuff.

rock-

mochinist
12-29-2006, 12:29 AM
May not apply to you, but AVG no longer supports Windows 98 SE on the free 7.5 version, which unfortunately one of my computers still runs. (I hated the Windows ME it came with so much I reverse upgraded. Guess it's time to move to XP. . . . )I'm pretty sure avas free still suports windows 98, it is what I use on XP, and I like it better than avg.

http://www.avast.com/eng/avast_4_home.html

Lew Hartswick
12-29-2006, 12:42 PM
You can upgrade to AVG 7.5 for free. I did so a couple of weeks ago. Just follow the links within their web site.
Yea. I did about a month ago and it works just as well . My only complaint is
if I'm on the web when the scheduled up-date time rolls around it takes over,
usually no problem but if the update is large (I'm on a dialup) it does sort of
impede my reading. :-)
...lew...

rws
12-29-2006, 06:14 PM
Thank you everyone. I followed the link and now have 7.5...............free!

miker
12-29-2006, 06:25 PM
Thanks rockrat for the link. I just downloaded and installed 7.5.

Rgds

rantbot
12-29-2006, 07:05 PM
May not apply to you, but AVG no longer supports Windows 98 SE on the free 7.5 version,

I don't see anything on the AVG site which says what OS it runs on.

Too_Many_Tools
12-29-2006, 07:13 PM
Anyone else having "time out" problems with the AVG site when attempting to download the free AVG 7.5 program?

TMT

Evan
12-29-2006, 08:06 PM
The net is in bad shape right now. Asia lost half of it's network capacity in the Taiwan earthquake as several major fiber optic cables were severed undersea. Data is being rerouted via Europe and major delays are resulting. Asia is running at 51% of normal, Europe at 77% and South America at 69%. North America is less affected at 86% of normal. AVG is in Europe.

Expect problems as many Asian web sites are unreachable right now. This also applies to telephone service. This may have some impact on availability of just about anything made in China in the weeks to come as it severely disrupted all communications which will not be fully restored for weeks. Normal reordering of inventory will have been affected.

Too_Many_Tools
12-29-2006, 10:59 PM
The net is in bad shape right now. Asia lost half of it's network capacity in the Taiwan earthquake as several major fiber optic cables were severed undersea. Data is being rerouted via Europe and major delays are resulting. Asia is running at 51% of normal, Europe at 77% and South America at 69%. North America is less affected at 86% of normal. AVG is in Europe.

Expect problems as many Asian web sites are unreachable right now. This also applies to telephone service. This may have some impact on availability of just about anything made in China in the weeks to come as it severely disrupted all communications which will not be fully restored for weeks. Normal reordering of inventory will have been affected.

Thanks for the response...it makes sense based on what I am seeing.

You may find this of interest.

TMT

Quake shows telecom network fragility By TANALEE SMITH and PETER SVENSSON, Associated Press Writers
Thu Dec 28


A few seconds of undersea quaking was all it took to cause massive telecommunications disruptions throughout tech-savvy Asia, where Internet services slowed or stopped, phone lines went dead and financial transactions ground to a halt.

Analysts and industry insiders said the service disruption caused by the rupture of two undersea data transmission cables in Tuesday's earthquake in Taiwan is a sign of the vulnerability the world's telecommunications network, which was frenetically built out at the height of the Internet boom but has since attracted little investment.

However, activity is picking up, and the quake outage could open eyes to the need for more backup links.

"We are so accustomed to being connected at all points that it does shock people when suddenly it's no longer there," said telecommunications analyst Tim Dillon. "Particularly in this region, which is tremendously connected in terms of mobile (phone), data and Internet use."

On Thursday, long-distance telephone connections were elusive and Internet speeds remained slow and in some areas nonexistent in Taiwan, Hong Kong, Japan, China, Singapore and South Korea. It is expected to take weeks to fully repair the links.

"I haven't experienced anything like this before," said Francis Lun, general manager at Fulbright Securities, one of many Hong Kong financial firms that were forced to conduct business by telephone on Wednesday.

"We've become too dependent on these optic fibers a few of them get damaged, and everything collapses. Many lost the opportunity to make fast money."

Breaks in the undersea cables are not uncommon the culprits include earthquakes, volcanos, fishing trawlers, ship anchors and nibbling sharks. For this reason, fiber links are generally built as loops. For instance, FLAG Telecom's North Asia Loop runs undersea from Hong Kong to Taiwan to Korea to Japan, then takes another route back to Hong Kong. If one link in the loop breaks, data will automatically be switched to flow the other way around the ring, and customers would ideally not even notice a change.

Outages occur when too many links break at the same time on too many rings. The sea bottom south of Taiwan, where the earthquake occurred, may have a dozen cables running in a relatively small area (though the exact location of the cables is usually not publicized by the owners, typically groups of telecommunications companies).

In a similar event, a magnitude-6.8 earthquake in Algeria in 2003 damaged cables in the Mediterranean, cutting links to France and slowing down Internet access across the Middle East.

Part of the problem with this week's break may have been that a number of providers in Hong Kong and Southeast Asia may have rerouted U.S.-bound traffic through Europe to avoid the cut south of Taiwan. But there is just a handful of cables leading west.

"The cable routes to Europe are overcrowded," said Dillon, senior research director with U.S.-based Current Analysis, which studies the telecom industry.

Before the Internet, satellites were a viable backup to land and sea links for international phone calls. But satellites can't carry the volume of Internet traffic that fiber-optic cables enable. Using them is expensive, limiting them to "mission critical" purposes, said Duncan Clark of the Beijing-based consultancy BDA China.

That leaves Asia relying largely on high-speed cables running under the Pacific Ocean all the way to North America, still the technology and communications giant.

There are about 15 of these cables. Most of the high-capacity ones were installed in 2001, when companies raced to capitalize on what they thought was an imminent surge in demand for Internet traffic. But demand grew slower than expected, and the building boom ended badly for investors in companies like Global Crossing and MCI.

Now, Internet traffic is starting to take a serious bite out of the immediately available capacity on the cables, though they can still be upgraded or "lit" by additional laser beams to carry more data. But the Taiwan earthquake demonstrates that capacity is not everything: a big seismic event can affect many cables if they run close together.

Earlier this month, a consortium announced plans to lay a new $500 million cable that should provide some more redundancy, enhancing a lower-speed system that serves as the lone direct link between the United States and China.

The consortium for the 11,000-mile system includes New York-based Verizon Communications Inc., China Telecom, China Netcom, China Unicom and companies in Korea and Taiwan. Construction is due to begin in the next three months and end in the third quarter of 2008.

"That cable will assist in providing additional restoration, additional redundant routes, because obviously it's a very active region in terms of seismic activity," Verizon spokesman Gil Broyles said.

With the cable in place, Broyles said, Verizon has the opportunity to go beyond the usual "ring" structure and configure a "mesh architecture." Instead of routing in one of two directions around a loop, meshed systems have more than two routes to each endpoint.

Verizon earlier this month completed a mesh system under the Atlantic, the ocean with by far the greatest amount of data traffic.

"The undersea cable in the Atlantic is a little bit more of a mature infrastructure," Broyles said. "We basically combine six cable routes within one system so that customer traffic can survive even multiple cuts."

That makes the Atlantic an unlikely place for a major outage, but it could still happen elsewhere.

Stephan Beckert, an analyst at Washington-based research firm TeleGeography, points out that there is just one high-speed cable loop, the Southern Cross, connecting Australia and New Zealand to the U.S. The two strands of the loop both run through Hawaii (though over different islands), a seismically active archipelago.

___

AP Technology Writer Peter Svensson reported from New York.

Too_Many_Tools
12-30-2006, 11:39 AM
Not wanting to hijack the AVG discussion but if the Asian earthquake is responsible for my timeout problems, it looks like that the problem will be around for awhile.

TMT


Taiwan telecom won't build add'l backup By PETER ENAV, Associated Press Writer Fri Dec 29


Taiwan's largest telecom company said Friday it will not invest more in backup lines to protect against disasters like the recent earthquake that snarled telephone and Internet service across Asia, affecting service as far away as the United States.

The quake, which damaged undersea cables off Taiwan on Tuesday, was so rare that there is no need to spend money on extra lines, said Wu Chih-ming, a senior official at Chunghwa Telecom Co., Taiwan's largest telecommunications company.

Taiwan's Central Weather Bureau measured the quake at magnitude 6.7 while the U.S. Geological Survey put it at 7.1.

"We won't consider laying more backup cables for now because such an incident might not happen in another 100 years," Wu said.

On Friday, companies from Japan to Singapore were still scrambling to fully restore service. Since it will take weeks to repair the cables off Taiwan, companies were rerouting traffic through satellites and cables that were not damaged. Many of the cables are owned by groups of telecom companies, who share the costs and capacity.

The telecom crisis stunned Asia and demonstrated how tightly the region is bound together by hundreds of undersea fiber-optic cables.

The lines, made of clusters of glass fibers wrapped in protective material, carry Internet data and voice calls as pulses of light.

South Korea's largest telecom company, KT, said it worked through the night with Singapore Telecommunications Ltd., or SingTel, to restore damaged lines.

"KT and SingTel worked through Thursday night to upgrade the service," Sung Won-jae, a KT spokesman said.

Internet access to international Web sites, as well as services for Blackberry mobile devices, had been fully restored, SingTel said Friday.

"As part of our redirection effort, cable traffic to the U.S. is being rerouted via Europe or Australia as well as using other channels such as satellite links and landlines," the company said.

Four repair ships were on their way to the damage site and were expected to arrive Tuesday, Chunghwa Telecom said.

Repairs, which would cost about $1.5 million, would take up to three weeks, the company said.

South Korea's KT did not plan on spending more on backup lines to prevent with future disasters because Tuesday's quake was rare, Huh said.

He said the lesson KT had learned was that it needed to restore lines more quickly.

In Japan, major carriers KDDI Corp. and NTT Communications said most fixed-line phone services were running.

In Manila, the Philippines' largest telecommunications company, Philippine Long Distance Telephone Co., and its mobile unit Smart Communications said Friday they had restored "sufficient capacity to handle normal" international voice and Internet data traffic.

"This has been accomplished largely by channeling our traffic flows to alternative routes," PLDT said in a statement.

China, however, seemed to be struggling to get its services up to speed. China Telecom Corp., the country's biggest telephone company, said on its Web site that only 15 percent of the international Internet circuits have been restored, and that "there are still serious problems on the routes to North America."

Tim Dillon, senior research director at U.S.-based Current Analysis, which studies the telecom industry, said customers in Asia will have to get used to slow services for weeks.

"We have a lot of traffic all going to alternate routings at the same time," Dillon said. "It's obviously going to result in slower speeds and congestion as everyone piles onto the same cable."

___

Associated Press writers Kim Kwang-Tae in Seoul, South Korea, Tanalee Smith in Singapore, and Scott McDonald in Beijing contributed to this story.

Evan
12-30-2006, 01:03 PM
It shows just how fragile the electronic infrastructure is. The big quake in Taiwan in '99 killed one major computer company. Packard Bell had just signed contracts with Radio Shack to supply computers for the Christmas season, catalogs were printed with the firm prices. Then the earthquake hit and knocked out 1/2 of the chip making capacity on the planet for up to 2 months. The price of memory chips went up 600% in 3 days. PB was faced with losing maybe $100 or more per unit on at least 1 million units so they pulled the plug.

With China at only 15 percent of comm capacity it is sure to have an impact on inventories in the near future. Most seriously affected will likely be computers and related parts and accessories as these are stocked on a just-in-time basis with most of it air freighted to North America. You can expect some short term price increases and shortages of components such as memory and hard drives especially.

Glad I'm out of the business. This may have some impact on the impending release of Vista from Microsoft too.

MRL
12-30-2006, 05:14 PM
This may have some impact on the impending release of Vista from Microsoft too.

That could be a God send. :-)

mochinist
12-30-2006, 05:50 PM
This may have some impact on the impending release of Vista from Microsoft too.

That could be a God send. :-)I have read a little about Vista and the OS doesn't sound good one bit, gonna have to take care of my XP computer and learn Linux or switch to apple.

Evan
12-30-2006, 10:45 PM
It isn't well known that just three nukes exploded over North America, one on the east coast, one in the middle and one on the west at an altitude of 300 miles would put us instantly back in the stone age. Virtually all electronics would be destroyed in an instant. Fly by wire aircraft would fall out of the sky. Cars would die on the spot (except my Land Rover). All communications would cease. Power generation would die. These wouldn't be temporary effects but permanent destruction of the infrastructure while not causing any secondary blast damage or radiation effects.

Rich Carlstedt
12-31-2006, 01:17 AM
Well we saw that when the Sun Spot last year caused a brown out in New England. All the high tech equipment is not as hardy as a old knife switch when it comes to keeping power on line..
Just think if LA has a major quake and all the server farms and banking shuts down..hope they have backup in Kansas ! I heard that 80 % of all US banking transactions clear through LA.

Rich

Evan
12-31-2006, 02:10 AM
Yep. When a sunspot tosses a CME (coronal mass ejection) at the earth it compresses the ionosphere when it hits. This wobbles the earth's magnetic field by up to several degrees with a time scale of about half a minute per wobble. The moving field then induces large currents in long transmission lines that can trip them off and even cause damage.

One of these days I am going to build a simple magnetometer to detect this so I can have warning of possible aurora for picture taking.