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View Full Version : Anybody know what Kryptonyte locks are really made of?



Your Old Dog
01-10-2007, 10:23 AM
The metal seems to work very well for the intended purpose.

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/142/349682876_2fac90c5a0_b.jpg

torker
01-10-2007, 10:34 AM
LOL! "Somebody" got his tie stuck in the phone booth door :D
Russ

A.K. Boomer
01-10-2007, 10:51 AM
Dear god they even got the handlebars, Bastards -- dont laugh, you usually wont see this happen on this low end of a bike but some of the higher end machines have a set of wheels on them that are worth more than some peoples cars in fact you can drop 2 grand on just a rear wheel, the cable locks can weave in and out of most of your pricy components but they can also be snipped, I just got a new set of wheels for my steed but I dont own a lock, I just never let my ride out of my sight unless its in my house or locked in the trunk of my car... I would be physically ill if somebody stole my pony...

thistle
01-10-2007, 10:54 AM
better off breaking the lock,
it would have been quicker to do that than strip the bike
- totally stupid thief, a result of the modern education system,
no doubt he would make a good accountant or lawyer though.

Evan
01-10-2007, 11:02 AM
Dummy. All he needed was a BIC pen.

http://jeffwerner.ca/2004/09/kryptonite_lock.html

Wirecutter
01-10-2007, 02:05 PM
When I was a bike courier, my initial strategy was to use a bike that wasn't worth stealing, and a cable lock. Now those are real easy to defeat! But it kept the honest theives away from my ride, since I was never out of sight for more than 5 minutes. (At night, it was stored in a big locker)

There have been any number of mods and attachments to the venerable kryptonite lock to prevent theft. I have a metal sleeve for mine, because right around when I got it, enterprizing criminals discovered that you could snap the lock apart by sliding a standard pipe over the lock portion and breaking the lock off. There was also the freeze spray and hammer trick (shatter the lock) and now there's the Bic pen trick.

If I had one of the bikes AK Boomer mentions ($$$), there's no way I'd leave it locked out of my sight in some public place where it would be vulnerable. Similarly, if I had a high end sports car, I wouldn't leave it parked overnight in a shopping center parking lot.

Lucky for me, my tastes are pretty unsophisticated. I just can't appreciate the difference between a $700-800 bike and a $5000 bike. Even the $300 bikes these days are pretty decent.

-Mark

Evan
01-10-2007, 02:22 PM
All bikes weigh 30 lbs.

A 10 pound bike needs a 20 lb lock.

A 20 pound bike needs a 10 lb lock.

A 30 lb bike doesn't need a lock.

Magee
01-10-2007, 04:05 PM
When I was a bike courier, my initial strategy was to use a bike that wasn't worth stealing...

No Kidding... I spent much of college days working as a messenger in Boston. School was right in the city so I could work for an hour here or there between classes. I loved it.

The bike in the pic has likely been sitting for a while. Bikes like that get abandoned all the time in Boston... owner moves and leaves it, loses the key, etc. No one cares enough to try to defeat the lock and steal the whole bike, but the vultures will pick it clean if given enough time.
There are TONS of bare frames locked to posts around here... with everything gone except the cranks, bottom bracket and headset cups.

zopi
01-10-2007, 09:52 PM
oughta make em out of old dozer treads...jeez that stuff is tough...

in the pic above, the guy obviously isn't a scrounginf machinist...he'd a cut the frame for the tubing..<G>

first thing I thought of..hey! Tubing!

lazlo
01-10-2007, 11:15 PM
Dummy. All he needed was a BIC pen.

An angle grinder works better :p

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5TNTq3nhuh0

That's one of the funniest Youtube videos I've seen. In the last scene, the guy is breaking the lock on a bike at the World Trade Center with a hammer and chisel, and NYC's finest drives up and tells him to get out of the street :D

kendall
01-11-2007, 12:44 AM
Often they are left because the owner lost the key
Used to be a lot of them at the colleges locked up to trees and light poles that were rusted away, or stripped down to nothing.

I don't leave my bike on the street, it's too easy for one to totally disappear, as an earlier poster said, rims can get expensive, the rims on my gitane are fairly cheap at $130 , then you've got the rear hub at $70, and my cassette was $149, cheapest stainless spokes I could find were $1 each with nipples. so all told, with a mid range tire at $35 I've got close to $500 just in the rear tire, And nothing is top line, luckily I crept up on it and didn't pull it all out of my pocket at once. Worse part is that if I sold my bike I may be able to get $200 out of it, if it was stolen, someone may make $20.

I like the older style 10 speed type steel framed road bikes, most of mine are 70's or 80's, Bridgestone, Lambert, Gitane, Raliegh USA, don't like mountain bikes, and hate the harsh way aluminum frames ride, but I was at a local bike shop a while ago, just looking at what they had. Found one realy nice looking bike, carbon frame etc, asked about it, and instantly lost interest when the salesman said he could knock $800 off the price if I would pay cash. It's like no thanks, I'll stick with my old bridgestone!

Ken.

speedy
01-11-2007, 05:35 AM
Those bloody broken arse outlaw cyclists will steal anything :D

john hobdeclipe
01-11-2007, 09:51 AM
I like the older style 10 speed type steel framed road bikes, most of mine are 70's or 80's, Bridgestone, Lambert, Gitane, Raliegh USA,
You're not riding a LAMBERT (VISCOUNT) with the "death fork" are you?

Magee
01-11-2007, 10:29 AM
It's like no thanks, I'll stick with my old bridgestone!

Ken.


As would I. I'd take an RB1 over most new stuff today. Those are awesome bikes.

I actually own a Viscount as well. It's set up as a fixed-gear. People ask about the fork all the time ;)

A.K. Boomer
01-11-2007, 11:07 AM
and hate the harsh way aluminum frames ride,
Ken.


They are more brutal, but because they are so flex-free aluminum has the best energy efficiency transfer - its better than cro-mo by far, better than titainium or carbon fiber, the only thing i ever heard of giving an aluminum frame a run for its money was the old "kirk" magnesiums, they were a cast I beam frame and were so ridgid they would destroy wheels easily...

My mountain bike is aluminum and is very responsive as compaired to my cro-mo Mt. bike. it also has one of the best front suspensions going so its not bad on the trail either.

kendall
01-11-2007, 02:33 PM
My old lambert had the death fork on it, I put so many miles on that bike it was rediculous, rode back and forth to work all the time, about a 60 mile round trip, with no trouble. Bike died when I got kissed by a buick, broke a lot of brazed joints, and pretty completely trashed the bike, fork was still perfect surprisingly

I think the main fork problems were that most people don't ride light, and stay seated over any kind of bump.

Have the newer lambert with the replacement fork, still a nice bike, but not the same, even if it is chrome, it doesn't have the right look. Still has that realy nice crankset and chainwheel though!

My bridgestone is the RB-t, very nice bike, very easy and comfortable to ride, it's not my lightest bike, but it is my favorite for long rides.

I've only ridden aluminum frames a few times, don't own one, but they were solid bike, no suspension, should try one with suspension before I say I don't like any of them!

Back to locks, on rides I normally carry what I call my 'psycle-lock', just a 2ft length of shiny dog chain, and a small brass combination lock, normally for quick water runs into the store I don't realy lock it, just weave the chain through tire and frame and loop the lock through so it looks locked, works for most people. If I plan to leave the bike unattended for any length of time, I use a heavier chain and lock, then try to make at least two loops, one through the rear tire and frame, another front tire and frame, then both around post or pipe, set it up so they have to either cut the lock itself or the chain twice to get the bike, or at least the chain to get a tire.

Don't like the kryptonite locks, they're far too heavy to haul around. Back when they first came out, a lot of people would leave them on whatever post they normally parked at. And you can't do a complete lock up as I like to.

You can buy a very nice used frame set for under $200 almost anywhere, but useable rim/tire set ups normally start at $100, nice ones easily double that, so I like to gaurd my tires!

Ken.

pntrbl
01-11-2007, 04:56 PM
I just hafta know. What's with the death fork?

SP

Magee
01-11-2007, 06:30 PM
Lamberts/Viscounts came with a cast aluminum fork that gained a well-deserved reputation for parting ways with the steering tube at the worst possible moment (not that there's ever a good moment). Not all of them broke, but enough that most folks ditched them (myself included). It's easy to spot someone who knows the brand when they see mine. The fork is always the first thing they inspect.

kendall
01-11-2007, 07:15 PM
Lambert came out with an aluminum fork with a steel tube pinned to it for the neck. With careless riding the pin could shear or the 'peg' that stuck into the tube would break off, from what I've been abl;e to peice together there were only a small handfull of them that ever broke, but when lambert was bought (can't remember who) they didn't want the liability so recalled all the forks.

Like I say I rode mine for years with no trouble, and I;ve only traced down a couple incidents with them

But they're known as death forks, or suicide forks now.

And now they make forks out of carbon fiber, and several aluminum forks that are identical in appearance to the lambert forks.

link to lambert info:
http://sheldonbrown.com/lambert.html

and just for the fun, here's my rbt:

http://sheldonbrown.com/bridgestone/1994/pages/47.htm

Bridgestone was a strange company, what other bicycle company would have an artical on sandcasting in the catalog?

http://sheldonbrown.com/bridgestone/1994/index.htm

Sorry, got carried away checking them out!

ken.

Too_Many_Tools
01-12-2007, 12:11 PM
Dear god they even got the handlebars, Bastards -- dont laugh, you usually wont see this happen on this low end of a bike but some of the higher end machines have a set of wheels on them that are worth more than some peoples cars in fact you can drop 2 grand on just a rear wheel, the cable locks can weave in and out of most of your pricy components but they can also be snipped, I just got a new set of wheels for my steed but I dont own a lock, I just never let my ride out of my sight unless its in my house or locked in the trunk of my car... I would be physically ill if somebody stole my pony...

I go with the logic that if I can't afford to lose it, then maybe I shouldn't own it.

Many dollars and many sleepless nights are spent on stuff that we would be better off not having.

With a vehicle (car, truck, bike) in a large city, you need to plan on what you will do when it is stolen...not if.

TMT

A.K. Boomer
01-12-2007, 01:21 PM
I hear you with most things but not a bicycle, I cant afford to lose it but i also cant afford not to have it either, its my only form of health insurance and a direct link to my sanity or what little i have left, To keep things in perspective though both the wheels i just bought cost me $250.00,,, the only way i could justify a $2,000 dollar rear wheel is if i was trying to do an assault on the one hour world record at the nearby colorado springs velodrome and at 46 im no slug but i dont think its going to happen...

I do need my $250.00 wheels though so i can keep spanking the kids half my age in my little town, its part of the link to my sanity ;>}