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Fred_M
01-11-2007, 05:02 PM
I want to acquire a rotary table and was wondering.
Grizzly,HF and others offer a few. Phase II seems to be the only one
that admits to specs on flatness,concentricity and so on. Are the others equal, better or worse?

SGW
01-11-2007, 05:14 PM
There has been discussion of this before, so a check of the archives ought to turn up some information.

As best I can remember, Phase II was preferred to the others.

Generally, I find that good companies aren't afraid to publish specs, and quality tends to fall as obfuscation increases.

Bill Pace
01-11-2007, 06:07 PM
Yeah, this comes up fairly often and IIRC, Phase ll comes out on top, hands down. I know the 8" er I got is just a really nice piece of tooling.

One that REALLY gets low marks is the HF---must really be bad from some of the scathing comments I've read....

Put Phase ll in the search window and you'll probably have a couple hours reading....

John R
01-11-2007, 07:31 PM
I have a Phase II 6 inch rotary that is OK even after being buried in the mud after Katrina....looks pretty bad and has some backlash but does a good job.
John R

CCWKen
01-12-2007, 01:19 AM
Yep, go Phase II. Don't bother to search the forums. You might come across a rather embarrassing moment. I remember getting ripped for "misspelling" hernia as hemroids or something like that. Unless you have a crane available over your mill, stick with less than 10". :D

Alistair Hosie
01-12-2007, 04:06 AM
I bought a vertex 6" and am pleased with it Alistair

BadDog
01-12-2007, 04:39 AM
Speaking of hernia, I've got a 12" v/h Troykee I picked up for $100, and that's about the only way I'll be "picking it up" without a hernia. For something that sounds so small, "only 12" diameter", that thing is freaking HEAVY. I could have lifted it onto the table in my younger days, now I don't even want to lift it from horiz to vert without asking my son for help... :( I've got an 8" "Manex" (whatever that is) Horiz that is much, MUCH lighter and easily handled, but it's not really very robust and mostly good for aluminum or light work IMO. I wish I had something in between.

torker
01-12-2007, 05:17 AM
The only thing I have to add...if you have a big enough mill...go for something bigger than a 6" table. I've found that it is pretty limiting at times.
If I had it to do over..I'd buy at least an 8" R/T.
Russ

QSIMDO
01-12-2007, 09:38 AM
I was -given- a 15" Bridgeport rotary table.

I've since asked the guy what I did to offend him!

So, I built a stand the same height as my mill table and added ball rollers to just slide it on & off. There is NO picking up this table.

However, having just typed that, I flashed on the fact that I recently raised my mill by a couple of inches....#$(*&^%$^%^!!

This could become a permanent fixture on the mill!

hey...that's not such a bad idea.

Bill Pace
01-12-2007, 09:49 AM
I was -given- a 15" Bridgeport rotary table.

I've since asked the guy what I did to offend him!

So, I built a stand the same height as my mill table and added ball rollers to just slide it on & off. There is NO picking up this table.

However, having just typed that, I flashed on the fact that I recently raised my mill by a couple of inches....#$(*&^%$^%^!!

This could become a permanent fixture on the mill!

hey...that's not such a bad idea.
>"I was -given- a 15" Bridgeport rotary table.<"

Sheesh!! a 15incher!! I cant begin to imagine trying to wrestle that bad boy around by myself ------

What does that thing weigh?? HAH!, bet theres no chatter with it!!

lenord
01-12-2007, 09:58 AM
I got mine on sale a few years ago from J&L. It's an import that came with a spec sheet. Flatness and accuracy are excellent.
It is a 10" and weighed in at 130 lbs before I modified it a little. It is the heaviest I would care to lift without a small crane or floor stand of some kind.

Lenord

Dawai
01-12-2007, 10:04 AM
If ya remember,. that's why JohnS put a crane off the back of his mill.... to lift them silly tables..

<Mine has been powered twice> I got mad at geckodrive and stripped off a perfectly good working indexer.. I showed him. (as I had blisters on my fingers)

The tiny 4" HF one? I put a lantern post on it a friend up north sent me. It has so much play in the table it induces chatter (cutting radius on rollers). so.. I wonder what they made it for? I need to take it apart and see if I can bush it. I have been stubbing my toe on it for a while now.

Someone on here said you were not supposed to machine on them unless they are locked?? Any clue about that?

JCHannum
01-12-2007, 11:11 AM
On most rotary tables, there is some means of adjusting the engagement of the worm and gear to reduce backlash. I don't know about the HF versions, you may have to dismantle and finish building it.

With the worm properly adjusted, and a slight drag on the table, the table can be moved for machining radiused shapes and slots. You do have to be aware of climb milling, and turn in one direction, avoiding reversing the table, but they are designed with this operation in mind. When using for indexing or bolt circles, it is a good idea to lock the table.

Fred_M
01-13-2007, 01:56 AM
Thanks guys, nothing like the voice of experience.
The coments make interesting and entertainning reading.

Paul Alciatore
01-13-2007, 03:18 AM
I bought a Grizzly 10" that was on sale and have been happy with it. My only regreat is that it did not come with any circles so all settings must be made with the collar markings and vernier. But it is nice an big so I don't mind.

I got a matching tailstock a bit later, also on sale. I haven't used the tailstock yet but it is there when I will need it.

A 10 inch is about as big as I can lift - with some care. Anything bigger would definitely require some sort of lifting device.