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rotate
01-16-2007, 01:19 PM
A friend of mind had a nice little brass hammer, which was filled with mercury. When you shake it, you can feel the mercury moving around. It delivers a nice solid blow when you hit with it.

Is there a name for this hammer, and what was it designed for?

RPease
01-16-2007, 01:35 PM
I think it's called an "evironmental hazard hammer" if the thing breaks open and leaks..........LOL

Optics Curmudgeon
01-16-2007, 01:40 PM
Dead blow hammer, are you sure it's mercury and not lead shot? never seen or heard of a mercury filled one. Expensive as well as hazardous. On the other hand, I have used a mercury filled plumb bob, so....

Joe

stuntrunt
01-16-2007, 01:52 PM
Never seen one, but heard of them... I was told they were used (very small ones) during surgery, when some very fine and precise chiseling needed to be done. These hammers are supposed to prevent the chisel from bouncing back when used on bone (which has a surprising amount of spring to it).

IOWOLF
01-16-2007, 02:49 PM
Oh yea just what I want in an open wound,Mercury.

Alistair Hosie
01-16-2007, 04:09 PM
Are you sure it's mercury and not desicated meatloaf and haggis in there?:D Alistair

Rich Carlstedt
01-16-2007, 06:11 PM
Gosh guys, you sound paranoid about Mercury..
It is not as "deadly" as everyone makes it out to be.
Too much extremism from our News media I am afraid.
The really dangerous form is organic mercury, "methyl mercury.
I am not saying its "Good', only don't go screaming into the streets!.
Murcury is all around us. Its in your teeth, and mine..
it's in Medicines (mercurichrome, Prep H, paint ,etc)
If it's spilled , sprinkle powered tin or silver and it will lock up into
an amalgym..simple ! its locked up.
Call the EPA and you will be inundated by hysteria..
If you are really worried(?)..think about a chuck spinning at 1000 rev's with your head next to it.. far more damage potential IMHO.
Rich

nheng
01-16-2007, 06:26 PM
Right on Rich ! I used to play with mercury that I got as a kid from old "quiet" wall switches. Let it roll around in the palm of my hand. Never had any open wounds at those times :) OTOH, I had an uncle who came within inches of death many years back but he worked in a chemical plant and must have absorbed an excess amount somehow. His CNS and blood were in pretty bad shape.

Weston Bye
01-16-2007, 09:31 PM
Gosh guys, you sound paranoid about Mercury..
It is not as "deadly" as everyone makes it out to be.
Too much extremism from our News media I am afraid.
The really dangerous form is organic mercury, "methyl mercury.
I am not saying its "Good', only don't go screaming into the streets!.
Murcury is all around us. Its in your teeth, and mine..
it's in Medicines (mercurichrome, Prep H, paint ,etc)
If it's spilled , sprinkle powered tin or silver and it will lock up into
an amalgym..simple ! its locked up.
Call the EPA and you will be inundated by hysteria..
If you are really worried(?)..think about a chuck spinning at 1000 rev's with your head next to it.. far more damage potential IMHO.
Rich

A sane voice.

Your Old Dog
01-16-2007, 09:34 PM
I think it's called an "evironmental hazard hammer" if the thing breaks open and leaks..........LOL

In the 6th grade at St Edwards the science teacher used to pass a handfull of mercury around for all of us kids to handle and play with. I was about 12 yrs old.

RPease
01-17-2007, 01:48 PM
In the 6th grade at St Edwards the science teacher used to pass a handfull of mercury around for all of us kids to handle and play with. I was about 12 yrs old.


Well...........If a 6th grade science teacher thinks it's safe........that's good enough for me............What's the EPA know anyway?

andy_b
01-17-2007, 02:02 PM
we also used to play with mercury in school. the only reason the teachers finally got rid of it was EPA regulation. my dad also used to play with mercury when he was in school. judging by the fact that almost every person i have ever spoken to over the age of 35 or so has played with mercury (and it is still common in dental repair), if mercury was as deadly as the media makes it seem, don't you think there would be millions of Americans dead from it by this time? i wouldn't eat it or heat a big tub of it and inhale deeply, but it isn't like handling plutonium. now if your friend was to break that hammer open and call the fire department to tell them he had a mercury spill in his garage, THEN he would be asking for trouble.

andy b.

thistle
01-17-2007, 02:10 PM
up until fairly recently a good shot measure of mercury was good to cure all sorts of venerial complaints, bad curses and other ailments the doctor couldnt cure.
goes in one end ,comes out the other.dont rightly know how long it takes , but come rolling out it does......

now when it gets into an organic form - watch out!

Evan
01-17-2007, 03:08 PM
Metallic mercury is certainly far less dangerous than the readily bioavailable forms such as methyl mercury. However, it isn't "safe" either. It slowly evaporates at room temperature and pressure and will gradually oxidize very slowly to more available forms.

When I used to service Xerox equipment it was always a problem to have a Xerox copier in a dentist's office. Even though the machine would normally be a good distance from the treatment rooms where the amalgam was mixed and used the machines suffered symptoms of "mercury poisoning" in short order. The evaporated mercury would collect in the machine and "poison" the photoreceptor material in such a manner that the selenium coated drum at the heart of the process would only last a few weeks instead of months or even years. The result would be first faded and then blank copies as the mercury built up in the machine.

The human body has an amazing tolerance for many poisons, especially heavy metals, since they are a normal part of the environment albeit usually at very low levels. Even though that is the case it is still a very good idea to minimize your exposure to these toxins as much as possible. The particularly applies to children as most of these kinds of toxins have significant effects on the nervous system and that effect is greatest while it is still developing.

It may not seem to be causing damage since those exposed may appear perfectly normal with no apparent adverse effect. But, what if the main adverse effect of low exposure is simply to lower the potential intelligence by a dozen or more points? There is no way to determine after the fact that it has happened but given the proven effects of heavy metal exposure it is extremely likely that this does happen.

This reason alone is sufficient to justify the present concern and caution that is exercised to prevent mercury exposure. I wouldn't have it any other way and I want my children and grand children to have every possible advantage in life.

laddy
01-17-2007, 04:11 PM
Hey,
Do you remember how shiney it made a silver dime or quarter?? We used to always have one in our pockets. I spilled a small bottle of mercury on the table I had my Lionel trainset back in the early 50's. You should have seen the sparks!! I am sure when I am dead and they crack my head at autopsy it will probably be like looking into a mirror. The term Mad as a Hatter was due to the hat makers holding the strips of felt in their mouths as the habadashers made the hats. The last step in the processing of felt was to pass it through a vat of mercury so that the dirt and dust would float off and not spoil the nap of the material. Neron damage caused the bizarre mental behavior. Fred

winchman
01-17-2007, 04:46 PM
"The evaporated mercury would collect in the machine and "poison" the photoreceptor material in such a manner that the selenium coated drum..."

That's just what you need -- a hazardous material contaminated with an even more hazardous material.

Roger

ligito
01-17-2007, 07:35 PM
"lower the potential intelligence by a dozen or more points"

So, that's where I went wrong as a child, when playing with Mercury.

That explains a lot.:D

andy_b
01-18-2007, 11:41 AM
did you guys see the story this morning about the subway that was shut down last night or this morning because someone spilled some mercury? coincidence, or the work of the paranormal?????? :)

andy b.

A.K. Boomer
01-18-2007, 09:00 PM
The term Mad as a Hatter was due to the hat makers holding the strips of felt in their mouths as the habadashers made the hats. The last step in the processing of felt was to pass it through a vat of mercury so that the dirt and dust would float off and not spoil the nap of the material. Neron damage caused the bizarre mental behavior. Fred




I posted something simular on here awhile back when the subject of mecury came up --- but the difference was that i heard that mercury was used in the process of "forming" the hats because its so heavy and liquid yet wouldnt permeate the felt or get it "wet"(a bar of gold will float in mercury),,, it was put into the hat itself and then the former (hatter) would dampen his hands with water and rub the part of the hat that he wanted to conform ------ either way it doesnt sound like something you would want to do everyday:eek:

But there's no disputing its use for hats back then and there's also no disputing the good old expression "mad as a hatter"

nheng
01-18-2007, 09:14 PM
"The evaporated mercury would collect in the machine and "poison" the photoreceptor material in such a manner that the selenium coated drum..."

I would have thought that the airborne grinding dust, water vapor from rinsing and spitting, and smoke from (then) smokers and from that toaster oven in the adjacent kitchen area would have overshadowed the vapors from a heavy metal many times over.

RE: Hatters ... they must have made great mates for those poor women who painted the radium hands on instruments, clocks and watches, pointing their paint brushes in their mouthes :(

Evan
01-18-2007, 09:56 PM
Lots of different materials will affect the selenium properties. We also had problems with any machine near the old ammonia process blueprint duplicators. I once had serious problems with a machine in the plant foreman's office at a copper mine in the rolling and flotation mill where they separate the copper from the ore.

I removed the air filter from the machine and had it analyzed by the assay lab. It had huge amounts of copper, silver, molybdenum and traces of gold and mercury. In fact, it had so much that I may have accidentally stirred some shjt up with the union. Too bad.

Mercury reacts with selenium in such a way that very small amounts change the photoconductivity. It works the same way as doping other semiconductors. It only takes a trace of the dopant to change the properties.

Frank Ford
01-18-2007, 10:27 PM
Ooh, I have a small bottle with about 25cc of mercury somewhere in the shop. I think I'll make a teeny dead blow hammer with it. Never had a good use for it before - got from my grandpa's garage when we cleaned it out in 1962.

Fortunately for me, I was raised in the 1950s, before chemicals were poisonous. . .

Cheers,

Frank Ford
FRETS.COM (http://www.frets.com)
Gryphon Stringed Instruments (http://www.gryphonstrings.com)
My Home Shop Pages (http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Machining/index.html)

fixerdave
01-18-2007, 11:01 PM
Lee Valley offers "Classic Reprints" of old, really old, shopnotes articles (here (http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p=42563&cat=1,46096,46100&ap=4), if you're interested). I remember reading one about hardening steel... the directions started with: "Boil a pot of mercury..." If I did that, they'd cordon off the whole block.

I agree with Evan. Sure, you may not die - you might not see any problems at all. But then, maybe it's just that you don't make the connection. My Dad, an old logger, was haranguing the other day about how all the new regulations are so stupid. You know, not draining gallons of oil onto the ground while doing oil changes, not dragging logs through streams beds, etc, etc, etc,... Of course, all those new regulations just might have something to do with the collapsing fisheries and protecting spawning beds. He just didn't make the connection.

Certainly, many new regulations go way overboard; that's what happens when people can sue. Still, I'd rather be safe than sorry. My kids, should I ever have any, are not going to be playing with mercury the way I did, at least not outside of a science lab.

What I wonder is: what are we doing now that people will look back on and say "I can't believe they actually did that... Couldn't they see..."

David...

Steambuilder
01-18-2007, 11:27 PM
people view mercury today with the same hysteria as they view asbestos.(THE "A" WORD :eek:!! ) i remember in school, we had an old building that had the steam heat pipes going up through the classrooms to the floor above. We would horse around, and bounce off the pipes which were insulated with asbestos. the stuff would come down on us, get in our hair, etc. and yet, I'm still breathing.

dp
01-19-2007, 01:30 AM
More people are injured from aspirin poisoning than from mercury poisoning. One only need preserve a sense of proportion. Besides, mercury is way more fun than aspirin. When I was a kid we not only had plenty of mercury around, we had neon transformers that would sling a 3" Jacob's ladder from coat hangers. What didn't kill us didn't kill us, and won't again. Then there was all that potasium chlorate and sugar that is so hard to get today. And calcium carbide. I haven't seen red phosphorus since I was 15 - used to find it everywhere. Seems kids today spend too much time altering their minds rather than developing them. I played with nitric acid, they played with LSD. I made hydrogen balloons with battery acid and today they suck nitrous oxide from balloons. Damned frustrating - I'm going to go drag a log through a crick tomorrow.

Evan
01-19-2007, 01:46 AM
the stuff would come down on us, get in our hair, etc. and yet, I'm still breathing.
Not everyone that is exposed gets pulmonary fibrosis, asbestiosis or lung cancer. However, some do. Some that were exposed are no longer breathing, for that reason.

Not everyone that has been exposed to mercury has brain damage, liver and kidney damage etc. Some that were have children with the IQ of a head of lettuce. Others have no children. Some are dead.

Mercury is a proven toxin as is lead, arsenic, thallium and many other heavy metals.

The bad effects aren't always easy to quantify. I have a mouth full of mercury amalgam fillings put in when I was a child. Bad teeth, they crack easily. Most people wouldn't consider me mentally handicapped. That isn't necessarily the case.

I have a major deficit in one particular area. There is a portion of your brain tasked with remembering faces. This has been identified using positron emission tomography that shows certain groups of neurons "light up" when a face is recognized. Mine don't work, hardly at all. I can meet somebody several times in a short period, several days for instance, and I won't recognize them the next time I meet them. This isn't a sometime thing, it's virtually all the time. I would make a lousy racist because I often can't even remember what skin color somebody is. It doesn't seem to be a memory problem but a recording problem. The information isn't collected.

I have a less obvious but more important deficit. I have a very difficult time with higher math. I really have to work at it and it really pisses me off because I like math, especially the complicated stuff. But it sure isn't easy for me. Yet, I have an intuitive understanding of many related areas such as formal logic and boolean algebra.

Are these deficits important? They are to me. Can they be easily measured? No. Are they the result of early exposure to mercury? Nobody knows. Could it be mercury exposure? Yes, mercury is proven to cause developmental problems in the brain.

Every person is an individual ( tautological ). My great uncle Roger Williams was a champion of the concept of biochemical individuality and was largely responsible for bringing the concept into the scientific vocabulary. He proved in his research that no two people react in the same manner to exposure to the same chemicals. Tolerances and sensitivities to chemicals and toxins run a full range with wide variation between individuals as well as genetic groups. Your experience with exposure to asbestos is not an accurate indicator of what may happen to somebody else with the same exposure.

It may be that a majority of the population is resistant to the ill effects of low level mercury exposure. I have no evidence for this but am throwing it out as an example of what could be possible. Perhaps only a minority of people are sensitive to low level exposure and suffer varying levels of indetectable brain damage as a result.

If that were the case would it warrant disregarding the likely detrimental effects to that group of people? Note that I am not proposing that this would be in any way connected to racial genotypes. It could just as easily cross all racial boundaries and have nothing whatsoever to do with skin color. More than likely such a sensitivity would be inheirited as it would probably be genetically determined.

In my opinion and in the opinion of many, it is worth the expense to try to ensure the best possible outcome for the children that will eventually take all of our places on this world. We won't live to see that outcome in the long run but any other course of action I see as being short sighted, to say the very least, and morally irresponsible and reprehensible.

Banning and/or limiting these materials is worthwhile when it makes sense and the science supports it. It is certainly clear that our use of mercury in the past has resulted in very significant pollution of the entire food chain in the oceans and many large lakes. It is no longer considered safe to eat large quantities of tuna on a regular basis because there are no tuna that don't have a high body burden of mercury, anywhere.

Unfortunately, science doesn't always play a role in the process of making decisions about what to do in respect of possible pollutants and how they are regulated. Greed, self interest, political expediency, misplaced enthusiam for "saving the environment" and downright ignorance often play a much greater role in the process of deciding what to allow or what to do.

This is unfortunate as it frequently results in "throwing out the baby with the bathwater". Nearly all the materials in question have legitimate uses and can be used safely if appropriate measures are taken. Unfortunately this doesn't resonate well with the vast majority of people that proclaim their opposition to making use of such substances even when and where appropriate.

The most common attitude is that if it is bad anywhere then it is bad everywhere. It's the same as the "Don't want no atoms around here" approach to nuclear power.

The core problem is, as usual, an abject lack of understanding the science involved. This cuts across all groups, races, ethnic backgrounds, income levels and any other common social grouping of people. Very few people in present day society have the good fortune to have had a good grounding in general science.

It is also, very unfortunately, a self perpetuating problem. When even the educators aren't educated it is very difficult to make meaningful changes. My father spent his entire working career trying to change that, sometimes quite sucessfully. He was a science teacher that had the unique talent to make science interesting to nearly everyone that ever sat in his classroom. He convinced many a student that came into his class dreading the prospect of having to sit through a semester of science that science could be fun, interesting and especially valuable.

Knowing how things work helps you make informed decisions, improves your life style and helps prevent making mistakes, sometimes even deadly mistakes.

We live in a world that is in large part now suffering the consequences of that lack of knowledge combined with the ever present influence of the baser human attributes as I mentioned before.

The intelligent application of scientific knowledge has the potential to make the world a better place or at least mitigate the damage already done. That includes stopping further damage to our environment. If we can't do it selectively because of fear and ignorance then sometimes we must accept that the best practical way to do it is to use the broad brush even though a finer touch is more appropriate.

To place this directly on point, the use of mercury has had serious consequences in the past. Continuing to do as we have will result in greater damage to the environment and ultimately the inhabitants of the environment, us. Over reaction is better than no reaction and the political reality is that that is the only choice available.

Evan
01-19-2007, 01:52 AM
More people are injured from aspirin poisoning than from mercury poisoning

Nobody knows if that is true. If it were, what difference does it make?

dp
01-19-2007, 02:21 AM
Nobody knows if that is true. If it were, what difference does it make?

Sense of proportion - sense of balance. Keeping things in context. Like the annual death rate from medical malpractice in the US exceeds the annual death rate of military personnel in Iraq. That kind of thing. We pick and choose what we get indignant about. It's a data point, nothing more.

Of the deaths for which we can identify the cause, aspirin by far outweighs deaths due to mercury poisoning. Honestly, it is a red herring because aspirin is far more prevalent than mercury, but again, nobody's complaining. Selective indignation radar at work. Chevrolets kill more people than mercury. That's another red herring. Doesn't matter, people have learned to hate mercury but love Chevies. Life is weird like that.

Allan Dimmock
01-19-2007, 05:21 AM
people view mercury today with the same hysteria as they view asbestos.(THE "A" WORD :eek:!! ) i remember in school, we had an old building that had the steam heat pipes going up through the classrooms to the floor above. We would horse around, and bounce off the pipes which were insulated with asbestos. the stuff would come down on us, get in our hair, etc. and yet, I'm still breathing.

It has been a big problem here in rainy Swindon.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/wiltshire/news/062002/07/mesothelioma.shtml

The railway works closed 20+ years ago, and those affected are now over retirement age. I hope that whatever I am exposed to in my working years will not destroy any chance I might have of enjoying my retirement. That is too cruel a twist.

Your Old Dog
01-19-2007, 05:53 AM
Certainly, many new regulations go way overboard; that's what happens when people can sue. Still, I'd rather be safe than sorry. My kids, should I ever have any, are not going to be playing with mercury the way I did, at least not outside of a science lab.

What I wonder is: what are we doing now that people will look back on and say "I can't believe they actually did that... Couldn't they see..."

David...

I couldn't agree more. The problem is, once the law is written that's it and common sense is no longer allowed to play a roll.

A few summers ago they rolled out the fire departments heavy rescue for a chemical contamination problem at a Walmart store near Buffalo. I had to cover it for tv news. What the big fracus turned out to be a customer dropped a bottle of the same chemical I was spraying my Birch tree with the weekend before to kill aphids!

The there's the folks who said we were killing folks in Africa with Deet. We removed it from the neighborhood and more folks died or got sick from the lack of protection it offered against bugs like mosquitos. Moderation, perspective and common sense are becoming very rare in this effort to turn an analogue universe into a digital one of black and white answers to everything.

What will we look back on ............. Well, probably someday when the do-gooders take all forms of fat from our diets it will come back to haunt us. All in an effort to keep "me" healthy! Life is what it is, life. I have no expectiation now, nor have I ever, of getting out alive. I would just like a quality life style while I'm here that doesn't include having to eat sawdust and shubbery because someone feels it's safer for me.

God save us from those who would save us.

Swarf&Sparks
01-19-2007, 06:34 AM
Not too long ago, I was using a saucer of mercury as an artificial horizon with a sextant. Got a bit messy getting it back in the bottle sometimes. Did try to avoid prolonged contact though.

A.K. Boomer
01-19-2007, 10:11 AM
Sense of proportion - sense of balance. Keeping things in context. Like the annual death rate from medical malpractice in the US exceeds the annual death rate of military personnel in Iraq. That kind of thing. We pick and choose what we get indignant about. It's a data point, nothing more.

Of the deaths for which we can identify the cause, aspirin by far outweighs deaths due to mercury poisoning. Honestly, it is a red herring because aspirin is far more prevalent than mercury, but again, nobody's complaining. Selective indignation radar at work. Chevrolets kill more people than mercury. That's another red herring. Doesn't matter, people have learned to hate mercury but love Chevies. Life is weird like that.


I love aspirin too, iv been taking a half of one a day for the past 17 years, it produces more horsepower on my bicycle (dyno-tested) by keeping the blood thin, thin blood is easier to pump, it allows the heart to work less for easier oxygen transport... Like todays thinner viscosity motor oils --- it makes power by saving power:D (and i have the trophies to prove it!)

Red wine is good to, but if i ever get into a bad crash far from home i will most likely bleed out before i get back, there is almost always a price on performance...

RPease
01-19-2007, 01:49 PM
"(a bar of gold will float in mercury),,, "

I'll have to remember to never buy any gold (at least pure gold) from you. I always thought gold had a specific gravity of approx. 19.3 and mercury had an s.g. of approx. 13.5........

By my calculations.........gold should sink, but so should a steel ship in water. Must be the "shape" of the gold bar your talking about............

Just an observation............RP

stuntrunt
01-19-2007, 02:05 PM
There's not only the problem of
"I always thought gold had a specific gravity of approx. 19.3 and mercury had an s.g. of approx. 13.5........"
Gold also completely dissolves in mercury... Thats how the extract it from ore an it's why nurses never vear any jewellery - one broken thermometer can ruin a marriage ;)

charlie coghill
01-19-2007, 04:02 PM
After hearing about that lady in CA. that drank too much water I am going to sware off water. It may kill me. I think they were forcing her to drink the water.:D tongue in cheek.

Shaidorsai
01-19-2007, 10:28 PM
The things that scare people the most are not the things that kill the most people, and never have been. Take guns for instance. The mere subject has a high emotional scare factor in the press. The facts, however, show that automobiles have killed and maimed many times more people in the last one hundred years than bullet wounds have in the last 300 years, including deaths and wounds from bullets in every war since the revolution. Yet, automobiles have no emotional scare factor at all. Go figure. If they did, imagine what it might be like trying to buy and own an automobile.

BTW Casualties from bullets in wartime are historicaly a very small fraction of total war casualties. The biggest wartime killer by far has been disease.

JRouche
01-19-2007, 11:17 PM
Mercury... Ignorance is likely to kill more people than mercury.

Example...I heard at work today some co-workers talking about an incident where a guy was at a public event and spilled a small container of mercury on the stage. People started freaking out, knowing it was mercury.

I dont know the entire story, basically because I got tired of listening to these "professionals" talking about the "major hazmat" condition.

Gimme a break, they wanted to evacuate this place like there was a major fire.

My folks and uncle have talked about when they were kids awhile back. They had baby food jars (yeah, baby food in jars has been around for a long time) filled with mercury. They would let it out and play with it. I forget the exact tricks they would have the metal preform but it sounded like good fun. Also cleans pennies pretty good.

That was many years ago and they are still around to talk about it.

Granted, they never smoked the stuff or drank it, they weren't too dumb.

My point is, the ignorance of the general public (not the folks here, I honestly consider everyone here a step above the general public as far as common sense and general knowledge are concerned) has them scramblin around, making a major situation out of a fairly sedate event.

Again, not to talk badly about the guys who handled the problem. They are not educated in "metals" and only know what the media feeds them.. RUN, RUN FORREST its a liquid metal. I know of many liquid metals that are guaranteed to damage yer body a whole lot quicker and much worse.

Oh, here is a poll....

Would you want to hold one ounce of liquid mercury in your bare hands for one minute or one ounce of liquid iron in your bare hands for one minute? JRouche

A.K. Boomer
01-20-2007, 12:31 AM
I'll have to remember to never buy any gold (at least pure gold) from you. I always thought gold had a specific gravity of approx. 19.3 and mercury had an s.g. of approx. 13.5........

By my calculations.........gold should sink, but so should a steel ship in water. Must be the "shape" of the gold bar your talking about............

Just an observation............RP


golds heavier than lead right, yet when i look it up on the periodic table its not? I know --- it doesnt make sense to me, i just remember either seeing a picture of a bar of gold or a bar of lead and it was floating in mercury, Thanks for the correction... does anybody know if lead floats in mercury, I think it does but i cant prove it because i guess i dont know how to read the eliments:o

A.K. Boomer
01-20-2007, 12:43 AM
My folks and uncle have talked about when they were kids awhile back. They had baby food jars (yeah, baby food in jars has been around for a long time) filled with mercury. They would let it out and play with it. I forget the exact tricks they would have the metal preform but it sounded like good fun. Also cleans pennies pretty good.

That was many years ago and they are still around to talk about it.

Granted, they never smoked the stuff or drank it, they weren't too dumb.

JRouche




I can remember having about a thimble full of it to play with when i was a kid, One of my older brothers told me to be very careful with it so i was --- little peices get lost here and there and then you dont have it anymore, iv got a dog that when i first moved into this house she was a puppy and ate a few of the paint chips that i was scraping off the basement walls, i think they had lead in them cuz she sure is stupid...

Being a mechanic iv been careful all my life with brake dust, now im told its not in a real bad form because its so fine, its the bigger fiber pieces of asbestos that "hook" into your lungs and dont leave...

awemawson
01-20-2007, 06:40 AM
A friend of mind had a nice little brass hammer, which was filled with mercury. When you shake it, you can feel the mercury moving around. It delivers a nice solid blow when you hit with it.

Is there a name for this hammer, and what was it designed for?

Dead Blow.

It is unlikely to contain mercury, as the mercury would form an amalgam with the copper and zinc of the brass. Probably very fine lead or steel shot

Todd Tolhurst
01-20-2007, 09:26 AM
golds heavier than lead right, yet when i look it up on the periodic table its not?

Position on the periodic table doesn't tell you anything about the density of an element.

Evan
01-20-2007, 12:04 PM
The common form of the perodic table is ordered by element electron shell filling, not atomic mass. This results in "periods" that are vertical columns that group the elements by similar chemical properties. Mass depends on the atomic number which is dependent on the number of protons, not electrons. The chemical properties of an element depend almost entirely on the structure of the electron shells, especially the outer shell which holds the valence electrons.

Swarf&Sparks
01-21-2007, 07:03 AM
Atomic mass, as opposed to atomic number, here
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atomic_mass

J Tiers
01-21-2007, 10:44 AM
If it's spilled , sprinkle powered tin or silver and it will lock up into
an amalgym..simple ! its locked up.

Powdered sulphur works as well, and is a lot cheaper. And the compound formed is quite stable.

NEVER let the "authorities" know you spilled it though..... just sweep up the sulphur and put it aside in a container.

If the authorities get involved, the EPA may want to throw you out of your house, etc, tear up and dispose of flooring materials and so forth. You'll probably get a very large bill for the work. Don't believe it? Read the paper...... it happens.



I have a major deficit in one particular area. There is a portion of your brain tasked with remembering faces. This has been identified using positron emission tomography that shows certain groups of neurons "light up" when a face is recognized. Mine don't work, hardly at all. I can meet somebody several times in a short period, several days for instance, and I won't recognize them the next time I meet them. This isn't a sometime thing, it's virtually all the time.

I am the exact reverse.... I will meet a bunch of people, and days later I recognize every one of them, but I have NO idea what their names are.

If you TELL me a number of things, I very possibly won't recall them tomorrow.

But if I READ the same things, I will remember tomorrow, AND I may be able to re-read part of the page by "looking" at it in my mind.

Ii may not be a brain damage thing, but a difference in whether you are a visual or an auditory person.... which do you recall, words or pictures?

A.K. Boomer
01-21-2007, 11:55 AM
Atomic mass, as opposed to atomic number, here
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atomic_mass


Thats what i was using but it didnt make sense, I know that lead floats in mercury but the atomic mass does not prove that, the only thing that makes sense is "density" they call it density at r.t. (room temp.)

here are the specs; gold; atomic mass 196.97
density at r.t. 19.3

mercury; atomic mass 200.5
density at r.t. 13.534

lead; atomic mass 207.2
density at r.t. 11.34

Its hard to imagine a bar of either gold or lead "floating" in anything, but now i remember working at the motorcycle shop and we used to pick on the honda gold wings because there such boat anchor's -- so we started calling them "lead wings" then my older bro said -- why are you giving them a name that makes them lighter? so we went back to the original name and just would say it with a sarcastic lisp :p

Evan
01-21-2007, 12:14 PM
I mispoke (miswrote?). Atomic mass is correct. Atomic number is the number of protons in the nucleus and in most cases produces the same ordering as atomic mass with only a few exceptions.


Ii may not be a brain damage thing, but a difference in whether you are a visual or an auditory person.... which do you recall, words or pictures?

I recall sounds and images equally well, that is to say very well, not faces though. Faces apparently have a special part of the brain dedicated to the task of remembering them, separate from images in general. This also has been demonstrated by experiment. If I hear a voice I can identify that voice later, much later, if I hear it again. Images I recall almost like an internal photograph although that ability has declined with age. In some cases I can close my eyes and relax and see those images as if looking directly at them projected on a screen.

Interestingly, in my dreams even people I know are usually faceless.

A.K. Boomer
01-21-2007, 12:33 PM
I mispoke (miswrote?). Atomic mass is correct. Atomic number is the number of protons in the nucleus and in most cases produces the same ordering as atomic mass with only a few exceptions.

.



Now im really confused, wouldnt the higher #'s mean thier heavier?
so going by the atomic mass lead would be heavier than gold?
the only thing i can put together is the density #'s make more sense...

Todd Tolhurst
01-21-2007, 12:37 PM
Atomic mass, not suprisingly, refers to the mass of an atom. Atomic mass is quite distinct from the density of a bulk element, which is a function of just how many atoms pack into a given volume.

Density is the measure you want.

Evan
01-21-2007, 01:11 PM
Now im really confused, wouldnt the higher #'s mean thier heavier?

Yes, it does mean the atoms are heavier. That does not determine how tightly they will pack together in solid form (as Todd said). Different atoms form different crystal structures with varying densities. It's like packing different geometric shapes. A sphere contains the most mass per unit surface area but a cube packs better.

snowman
01-22-2007, 03:07 PM
Interestingly, in my dreams even people I know are usually faceless.

Thank God...I say that to people and they look at me like I'm psychotic.

My biggest fear is getting mugged or something....what did the assailant look like?

hmm...

Evan
01-22-2007, 03:42 PM
Yep, my problem too. Unless the person has some very unusual characteristic, say having a third eye or something I would never rely on my ability to identify them. I can however spot a good looking female at a distance of 500 meters at a glance, especially if skin is showing. Don't know how that works either...

Todd Tolhurst
01-22-2007, 03:44 PM
I'm guessing you're not looking at her face... ;)

Rich Carlstedt
01-22-2007, 06:27 PM
The problem with most 'reports" is that they are based on 'asumptions'
Note in the above "Swindon Report" that some the patients were from the Swindon Roundhouse..Nothing was said about
1. Did they smoke cigarettes
2. Did they wash their hands before eating
I would believe that such behavior is "as" important, but I don't have to sell newspapers either.

In my early days, I worked all day long around "lead" pots heated to 600 degrees.
Of the 200 men I remember , Only 2 died from Lead related illness.
Both were constantly "warned" by the foreman..
One would heat his lunch (open can of beans etc.) next to the Pot, and the other smoked incessently even when handling bars of lead for loading the pot.
Strange, but those who report the loss of these 2 fellows I worked with will never relate to aborant behavior as the cause, or at least what assisted the demise...only 'exposure"..
Using that logic, we can say that Zoo keepers die because of animal behavior, and not the "zoo keepers behavior" (or lack there of !)
It is not politically correct to place any blame on the persons habits..heavens NO.. it is always the fault of the envirionment.....get the drift?

Rich