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Tom Buchanan
01-16-2007, 10:40 PM
evening,gents.,when I'm milling a small part and the chips start building up,I have a hard time seeing my line where I want to stop.I've wore out a few brushes(always get caught in the endmill)how do you folks handle this?thanks for replies.

torker
01-16-2007, 10:46 PM
I use a puff of air to blow the chips away. If I can't do that (cuz I'm too lazy to drag the airhose over) I start just short of where I want to finish...mill a bit of a hole then go back to the start position. I can hear the cutter load up when it hits the far side of the pre milled hole. I kill the feed at that point then when I'm near done I peck the final cut length. Not proper...I'M SURE! but it works for me!
Russ

japcas
01-16-2007, 11:29 PM
Before you start cutting bring the cutter down barely above the surface you are going to mill. Then bring the cutter over to the cut line and zero out the dial on the axis you are milling in. Then just use the mark to get close and then use the dial to go back to the same spot on each successive pass.

dalee100
01-16-2007, 11:30 PM
Hi,

I'm the new guy here but, a quick puff of air works well. But personally, I use a pocket magnet to sweep the chips away.

dalee

Herm Williams
01-16-2007, 11:42 PM
A magnet works fine until you get it caught in the mill . I use a couple of foot long piece of 1/4 inch plastic hose and and just blow the swarf out of the grove.
re

ahidley
01-17-2007, 09:00 AM
shop vacuume

gzig5
01-17-2007, 01:35 PM
Vacuum.
Keeps the floor clean and keeps the chips out of the ways. You can usually position the nozzle so it catches them coming off the cutter. Make an adjustable base to hold the nozzle and you are hands free. I just bought one of the little 2 gallon jobs just for this purpose. I will mount it up behind the head and wire a convenient switch.
Greg

gsp
01-17-2007, 01:36 PM
Shop vacume

Scishopguy
01-17-2007, 01:57 PM
Hi Tom,

The brush is fine and will do what you want but you want to keep it on the outbound side of the cutter. If you get any of the bristles on the inbound side of the cutter it will pull them in and possibly the whole brush, and worse yet, maybe even your fingers.

I also use air, as was mentioned, but not so much when milling steel or stainless as the oily splinters go everywhere and seek revenge later, when you are unaware that they landed on your stool.

slowtwitch
01-17-2007, 03:43 PM
I'm just a rank beginner, but, found that my small shop vac works wonders for me. I have the nozzle taped to a magnetic stand. Very little clean up afterwards :D

pete

bcreely
01-17-2007, 04:09 PM
I learned many years ago from my apprentice instructor, to keep a supply of wooden coffee stir sticks or popcicle sticks near the mill just for the purpose of moving the chips away from my cut lines. These will not get dragged into the cutter and just shear away if you get too close.

Magnets play havoc with endmills, and send shrapnel all over.

A pal gave me a half case of wooden tongue depressor sticks a while back, handiest things in the world, and free, for this and small epoxy projects. The local hospital was cleaning out old supplies.

Bob Creely

DeereGuy
01-17-2007, 05:44 PM
Why can't you just watch your dials?

CCWKen
01-17-2007, 09:16 PM
Ditto on watching the dials. (Or DRO if you have one) The last thing I want is my face and hands around the business end of mill. :eek:

ZINOM
01-18-2007, 01:12 AM
I use either a photographers air bulb to blow chips out of the way, or a small (airbrush) compressor with a hose I can set in any position....works well for my needs.

John