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Tom Buchanan
04-22-2007, 05:05 PM
Just had an eye exam,and got my glasses.The walmart readers weren't getting the job done anymore.Really having a time getting used to wearing them,faraway things seem kinda blurry.Anyone else experience these problems?thanks for replies.

scott96088
04-22-2007, 05:26 PM
Just had an eye exam,and got my glasses.The walmart readers weren't getting the job done anymore.Really having a time getting used to wearing them,faraway things seem kinda blurry.Anyone else experience these problems?thanks for replies.


I have worn tri focals for 10 years and faraway should never be blurry...
Close up gets hard to see when you need new ones.

If your having trouble take the glasses to your doc and let him check them out!!

Scott

Lew Hartswick
04-22-2007, 05:27 PM
Well since I've been wearing glasses for 68 years I can't be of much help. :-)
Without mine anything beyond about 10 inches is "blurry" .
...lew...

Mac1
04-22-2007, 05:34 PM
It has always been my experience that if the glasses are right, they woek the minute you put them on. If they are out of focus or its hard to find things (bifocals), they are not right.

Mcgyver
04-22-2007, 05:51 PM
agree with others, there should be no unpleasantness and only a little getting used to. I got a new pair once, and tried to tough it out through the weekend figure it was just me. finally went to a different optometrist who wrote a completely different script (that worked). I don't' know how often that happens, but it does

jimmstruk
04-22-2007, 05:53 PM
My experience (30 years) of wearing glasses is also that you put them on and immediately see better. If brand new glasses are blurry or cause headaches and tears you got ripped off and need another eye Dr. I have been there, Hate to throw away new glasses but have to see well. JIM

Tim Clarke
04-22-2007, 06:00 PM
Oh, do I ever feel your pain......... Had mine a little over 3 years now. I got bi-focals, and it didn't take too long to adjust to them. This was after about 40 years of having outstanding vision, about another 5 with my arms being too short to read anything and another 5 of using the cheap cheaters. I can still see as good or better at 300 yards without them. I believe in my case it's due to loss of light transmission thru the photo reactive tint and anti scratch coating.

After a couple weeks I got used to looking thru the right part of the lenses to have the object in focus. Oddly enough, the toughest thing to get used to was looking out the mirrors of my truck. I'd glance over and down into the mirror without moving my head. Out of the sweet spot in the center of the lenses, and down thru the bi-focal part. Couldn't see squat.

As far as the glasses themselves go, Take them back to the optical place where you got them, ask to recheck the grind, and double check the pupilarry distance, that's c to c on your eyeballs, and on the glasses also. Friends have had errors in the P.D. and it gave them fits until someone figured it out.

TC

Tin Falcon
04-22-2007, 06:51 PM
Tom:

The walmart readers weren't getting the job done anymore.
Did you get presription reading glasses? If the presciption was for close work only that could be the problem. I have worn glasses for about forty years now. I have only had a problem with one pair. They were military issue. For those of you that do not know military glasses are made in a federal pennatentury IIRC in Georgia. I swear they switched the lenses left to right. Everything was blurry with those. It takes a little to get used to a new prescription but not usuly more than an hour or two for regular glasses. IIRC it took a couple of days to get used to the bi focals.
Tin

Your Old Dog
04-22-2007, 07:11 PM
I have worn glasses for 50 years and now my eyes are getting better and I'm wearing them much less?

I have two pair, one conventional for driving and bifocals for normal reading.

I have a second pair with the prime lens set to the end of my clenched fist with extended arms. This pair also has a regular bifocal for reading. This pair is slimmer than most and I wear them low on my nose so I can look over top of the frame at distant things. I paid good money to get stainless steel and I did, but not the stems? ! they rust.

If you're new to glasses be real careful that nothing but you shirt pocket comes in contact with them. I carry a 3x5 card in my pocket for notes. The glasses go in front of the card with plastic lens facing the shirt material and anything else going in that pocket goes behind the 3x5 card. It works to perfection. My glasses spend a lot of time in my pockets these days and absolutely no scratches to the lens. (actually the 3x5 is really a 5x7 made into a tri-fold for notes. I can get about a week on one card and then transfer un-done projects and still need info to the next card)

JS
04-22-2007, 07:54 PM
Been wearing the same prescription for about 15 years now .

They never seem to change , last time my glasses broke I took the prescription into one of those hour or less places and had new ones made .

I do know that the wrong prescription will give me headaches .

J Tiers
04-22-2007, 10:10 PM
I've had them get teh angles wrong for astigmatism..... that will hurt.

In the worst case, it was the first set of variable-bifocals.... they just lectured me about how to use them, and would not listen to ANY of what I said.

Finally one schmart person checked the angles and said she had no doubt they were a problem. She was able to shift the lens, it was only out a little, and immediately things were much better.

REmember, they are supposed to HELP, not hurt. If the folks there do NOT wear glasses, you will 90% certain never get them to "get it", you will have to pay someone else.

BadDog
04-23-2007, 03:00 AM
Not entirely on topic for the original post, but perhaps for some of the respondents...

I got tired of wearing glasses, so I had laser surgery. Came out pretty good, wound up with 20/15 vision, I can see details I never saw with glasses. But most folks don't come out that well, certainly no guarantees. No star bursts at night, no problems driving. Maybe it's just getting old, but I did notice a bit more trouble focusing really close in, like inside 12" or so. But I've always been "near sighted" so maybe that was expected? I've also noticed a bit more light sensitivity than before, so I tend to keep sunglasses handy. But again, my corrective lenses were always tinted and UV blocking, so again, likely just an affect of not wearing glasses. Over all, best $3000 I've spent on myself in a long time. I would definitely do it again.

Wayne02
04-26-2007, 03:48 PM
I have a follow-on question on this subject as I have just returned from my annual eye exam. Eyes are fine cept I have trouble reading small print and have to hold the material away to get it in focus.

Before the appointment I went to walmart and got some 1x reading glasses. They helped a little but were a pain to use when transitioning between printed material and the computer screen (which I spend a lot of time doing). The puter screen was blurry and caused headaches with the glasses on, and I had trouble trying to use them hanging off the tip of my nose and attempting to look over them. I do run a big monitor with largish resolution size (600x800 or there abouts) and am about 28in away from the monitor, which without the glasses I can see fine.

Doc says this is normal with aging (44) and suggested I get bifocals with x power in the top for computer screen viewing, and xx power in the bottom for reading printed material. Does anyone else use glasses in this manner?

Doc says I need to decide if I want a line separating the two sections or if I want it blurred together. He seems to be a big proponent of the separation line. What do you guys prefer????

scott96088
04-26-2007, 03:54 PM
I have a follow-on question on this subject as I have just returned from my annual eye exam. Eyes are fine cept I have trouble reading small print and have to hold the material away to get it in focus.

Before the appointment I went to walmart and got some 1x reading glasses. They helped a little but were a pain to use when transitioning between printed material and the computer screen (which I spend a lot of time doing). The puter screen was blurry and caused headaches with the glasses on, and I had trouble trying to use them hanging off the tip of my nose and attempting to look over them. I do run a big monitor with largish resolution size (600x800 or there abouts) and am about 28in away from the monitor, which without the glasses I can see fine.

Doc says this is normal with aging (44) and suggested I get bifocals with x power in the top for computer screen viewing, and xx power in the bottom for reading printed material. Does anyone else use glasses in this manner?

Doc says I need to decide if I want a line separating the two sections or if I want it blurred together. He seems to be a big proponent of the separation line. What do you guys prefer????


Yup I do just that!! One set of Bi-folcals for the puter and one set tri-focals for everything else..


Scott

lynnl
04-26-2007, 04:31 PM
?
.....
Doc says I need to decide if I want a line separating the two sections or if I want it blurred together. He seems to be a big proponent of the separation line. What do you guys prefer????

I didn't become really dependent on glasses til I reached about the mid-50's, and even now (age 63) I still see better driving and distant without glasses. But taking off and putting back on is such a hassle I sometimes keep 'em on and sometimes not. But I MUCH MUCH prefer the transition lenses, even tho they cost more!! After a short while you're never aware of having to search for the right spot for a given range. Your head just seems to automatically find it.

Of course it's next to impossible to see for some tasks, e.g. trying to do something under the dash of your car, where the head must be down but you're trying to see closeup above your eyes. ...just one of perks(?) of aging! :D
But that problem would be the same for either lined or no-line bifocals.

RollaJohn
04-26-2007, 04:35 PM
Doc says I need to decide if I want a line separating the two sections or if I want it blurred together. He seems to be a big proponent of the separation line. What do you guys prefer????
The difference IMO between line and noline bifocals or trifocals is just the appearance of the lens to other people. They work just the same when you get used to them. The noline cost more. I have the noline trifocals, and no problems.

**EDIT**
For a person needing to do overhead close work get a pair that have the closeup correction at the top of the lens.

J Tiers
04-26-2007, 04:41 PM
Not quite the "same".....

With the "line" type you get a larger good area for close or far, but there are really two "ranges" that depend on your remaining focus ability. They are only "best" at one of two distinct distances.


With the no-line there are no distinct good distances", all are OK..... but the width of the good vision area is much smaller.

With a line-type, you CAN, if you bully the eye doctor and optician, possibly get an added strip at the top made for closer. Just depends, I knew someone who had that done.

With the no-line, no-way, can't do that.

winchman
04-26-2007, 05:21 PM
My eye doctor insisted I get the transition lenses when I started needed glasses for reading and a slight correction for flying. I tried them for two weeks but I wasn't comfortable driving, flying, or reading with them. Everything in the peripheral vision field seemed to be moving up then down as I went along. The worst thing was runway lights at night. I could hardly ever find the sweet spot, much less find it quickly. I couldn't tell if something more than several inches long was straight or curved.

I ended up chucking them and getting trifocals with lines between the segments, which I used only for flying. I can still drive without corrective lenses, and I use cheap +1.25 glasses for reading and close-up work. I still wear the sunglass version of my trifocals when I fly my RC sailplane.

Roger

Spin Doctor
04-26-2007, 05:32 PM
I've been wearing them for close to 44 years. Got my first pair on Nov 21, 1963. Have tried bifocals and can not stand them. Tried full lens bifocal perscription. That did not work worth spit. Regular distance perscription doesn't work either. My eye doctor suggested I try a perscription half way between both for work. Tried them and the headaches I was getting went away. Work great out to about 8 feet and into the normal range needed when running machinery. If I need to get close I just use standard safety glasses

Your Old Dog
04-26-2007, 06:00 PM
For working under the dashboard you need to ask for "plumbers glasses". I guess it's pretty common.

My friend had a pair of golfers glasses which had a little circular spot for magnifying in the upper left hand corner or one lens. We used to laugh when he'd cock his head like the RCA Dog to get a close look at some small detail! He died of a massive coronary because he was afraid to go to the doctor. I have a hard time forgiving him of that as he was a great friend.

capperbar
04-26-2007, 06:06 PM
Tom,
If you don't see well at distance and they are meant for distance, call your docs office and ask to have him/her to check it out. You shouldn't take more than a day or so to adapt.
Working on 180,000 exams and counting.
Sav

BillB
04-26-2007, 11:38 PM
Worst thing about getting used to bifocals was walking down stairs....

The other problem is the crick in the neck that comes from trying to read stuff on the top shelf.

I miss my contacts, but hey, sharp vision is worth whatever it takes. And yeah, glasses that are hard to get used to are probably IMHO prescribed or made wrong.

BillB

Evan
04-27-2007, 03:35 AM
I'll take issue with the "should be fine right away" theory. I have a bit of astigmatism in one eye but not enough in the other to correct. If made to the usual prescription then it causes one lens to have a slightly different magnification than the other. It drives me freekin nuts. What happens is that every thing that should be rectangular or square looks trapezoidal. The ground looks sloped when it is level. One side of a door looks farther than the other and so on.

The prescription is correct but I can't stand it. It especially screws up my ability to judge square and aligned when machining, which I really can't tolerate. I finally had to tell the optometrist to leave out the astigmatism correction.

So, it is possible to have a new pair of glasses that are made correctly to the right prescription and not be able to adjust. I tried for three weeks the first time I got a pair about 30 years ago and finally had to give up and get them replaced. It was even messing with my balance.

Lew Hartswick
04-27-2007, 11:23 AM
The other problem is the crick in the neck that comes from trying to read stuff on the top shelf.
BillB

Ain't that the truth. ! Trying to read the prices or descriptions on
items at the stores like HD or Lowes is a real Bit**. Also the bottom
shelf (when you bend down the distance lenses are in use and you
are too close) :-)
...lew...

kendall
04-27-2007, 12:31 PM
I wear bifocals, the smooth transition type, and when I first got them I was always trying to clean them up because I could see smudges, wipe 'em down, put them on, see the smudge, take them back off, look at them and no smudge, real pain. brought them back in and had them check them out, and it was the little numbers they put next to the bifocal section, with the glasses on I could see them as a blur/smudge, but couldn't see them while looking at em.

Went in for an exam monday. Looked at new frames, they've got the exact same frame as my $35 sunglasses, same brand, model number etc, for $229. I think I'm in the wrong business!

I agree glasses should not cause discomfort, anything other than nose pinch or ear discomfort means the perscription is wrong, or they are not sitting correctly so you're looking through them wrong.

Ken.

Tony
04-27-2007, 06:45 PM
funny how some topics come up so coincidentally.
had a VERY abrupt change in my vision a few weeks back...
bloodshot eyes, trouble focusing, etc. figured it was a recent
project i had that put me in front of this computer more than
usual. i couldn't "walk it off" so i went in for an eye exam.

turns out i have astigmatism in left eye. doc says "2.25"..
and 0.75 in the other eye. not really sure what those numbers
mean.. except that i need glasses.

ordered them today.. have to wait a week.

thing i don't get:

up to 2'-3' away i can see fine. everything is as clear
as its always been. after that its blurry. the same "blurry"
any distance after 4'. things that are REALLY far away are
the same blurry. :)

doc tells me i dont need to wear the glasses all the time,
just when i'm working close-up.. computer, shop, reading, etc.

this seems to be the complete opposite of what i'd need.
but then again, i'm not an eye doctor.

i've never worn glasses before.. he tells me to wear them
for the first 4 or 5 days non-stop, as it'll be "real weird" and my brain
needs to adjust. from this post, that doesn't sound to be
right. and if my brain is smart enough to adjust to "real weird"
why can't it adjust for "just a little blurry"?

anyway these things set me back $400 (antiglare/scratch, transition shades, etc) -- if only they'd go to a shade 10 for welding :)

the first thing i'm going to do is promptly sit on them. . or find some other imaginative way to break them. unless it came out of my lathe/mill, i'm absolutely terrible with delicate things.

sorry so long.. topic is close to heart.
-tony

Evan
04-27-2007, 09:32 PM
the first thing i'm going to do is promptly sit on them. . or find some other imaginative way to break them. unless it came out of my lathe/mill, i'm absolutely terrible with delicate things.

Try running over your nice new titanium frame glasses with a Land Rover in packed mud. :(

cybor462
04-27-2007, 10:21 PM
Wow so true. I wear tri focals. Had perfect vision until I hit 44 and was in college at the time so that may have helped. I first started using reading glasses. I still use them as quickies. I have them all over the house. Anywhere you could think of needing them.

I then needed bi focals which worked for a year. I them needed tri's which I have had since. I tried using no lines but they just did not do it for me. They are truly different. As stated they a much smaller area of view. I had many made all types of lenses. Never worked. I have active eyes, they say so I need all the area I can get. Really showed up working on the machines. Just never had enough area and I got the lined. Gives me much larger area which work well. The problem I have is slipping when moving all around when trying to get in close on the machines. Have to keep pushing them up.

Another thing I can say, I have read many studies about eye sight worsening due to glasses. They say the optic nerve weakens as the glasses allow the nerve to relax which is a bad thing. Some have eye exercises that they say do work. Called the see right plan.

Anyone heard of that or have tried it?

I would love to hear from someone that tried it.

Evan
04-28-2007, 02:49 AM
It's not the optic nerve that's involved. That carries the signals to the brain for processing. The problem that happens to everyone regardless of your vision acuity or lack of it is called presbyopia. This is hardening of the lens which results in loss of accommodation, the ability to change focus. If your eyes are normal 20/20 to start with then you lose the ability to focus up close. This is the "arms getting too short" syndrome and begins to become noticable in your forties. By the time you are in your fifties you have virtually no ability to change the lens shape via the muscles that control it, exercises or not.

John Stevenson
04-29-2007, 05:28 AM
Blind guy goes into Wallmart picks his guide dog up and starts swinging it round his head in a big circle by the lead.

Greeter rushes up and asks if he can help him in any way?

"No " replies blind man "I'm just looking round "



.

cybor462
04-29-2007, 10:09 AM
It's not the optic nerve that's involved. That carries the signals to the brain for processing. The problem that happens to everyone regardless of your vision acuity or lack of it is called presbyopia. This is hardening of the lens which results in loss of accommodation, the ability to change focus. If your eyes are normal 20/20 to start with then you lose the ability to focus up close. This is the "arms getting too short" syndrome and begins to become noticeable in your forties. By the time you are in your fifties you have virtually no ability to change the lens shape via the muscles that control it, exercises or not.

Evan do not want to get into a crazy debate but if your theory is correct why is it that millions do not wear glasses nor need them at any age. Surely if this situation as you describe is a normal aging thing why is it that only a percentage have it happen? To take it further why do many have the same problem in their 20's.

My father was blind by 35 and I am examined closely each year and sorry to disagree with you but the doc says its the optic nerve that weakens. I am not a doc but my hearing is still working. And he says that each year. I asked him about my worsening sight, not going blind just aging he says. He says the lense and its ability to focus is a situation but I am told my optic nerve is strong with no signs of weakening which contributes to sight abnormalities.

Evan
04-29-2007, 10:28 AM
Presbyopia isn't avoidable and is a natural part of the aging process. Many people don't wear glasses even though they need them. Of course, many people don't read or do close work either.


During middle age, usually beginning in the 40s, people experience blurred vision at near points, such as when reading, sewing or working at the computer. There's no getting around it — this happens to everyone at some point in life, even those who have never had a vision problem before.
http://www.allaboutvision.com/conditions/presbyopia.htm

[added]

Nerves don't "weaken" unless you have a condition such as Multiple Sclerosis.

pntrbl
04-29-2007, 10:49 AM
55 here and no glasses. I don't even wear sunglasses. Use it or lose it.

Hearing sucks tho. Too much Rock and Roll.

SP

Tony
05-07-2007, 04:35 PM
well, i just got my glasses.
i've been wearing them for about 1.5 hrs now.
I'm 33years old, these are my first pair.

I wanted to get some feedback about what i'm seeing and what to expect..

my whole world is trapezoidal. my monitor is no longer 19" diagonal.
it looks be be about 2" shorter on the right side.

and now, after an hour and a half wearing these glasses, if i take them off, EVERYTHING is blurry. even stuff that didnt used to be blurry before i put these things on.

are these glasses permanently training my eyes? i can feel the strain of new eye muscles coming to life. my doc says i wouldnt have to wear them all the time, but from what i'm seeing now, i'm afraid my world will be blurry if i take them off.

they didnt come with an instruction manual.
and my eye doctor likes to hear himself talk so he wasnt any help.
he'd answer questions i didnt ask and not answer questions that i did.

-Tony

ps.. if i take my glasses off, my monitor gets blurry, but at least its rectangular again :)

J. Randall
05-08-2007, 12:28 AM
Tony, I would go back and pitch a fit if you have to . Something is not right. I have worn glasses since the 8th grade, I am 56 now, and the only time I ever feel any strain is the first hr. or so and then it is very slight. Bifocals are a little harder to adjust to for some, but it should not be anything like you are describing.
James

Evan
05-08-2007, 01:18 AM
Tony,

That is exactly the same effect I had. I never was able to get used to it. Your mileage may vary.

James,

The problem is caused by having a prescription for astigmatism in just one lens. It causes a different image scale than the other eye and the brain interprets this as the object being closer than as seen by the other eye. The only way to reconcile this difference is to reinterpret the apparent shape of objects.

BadDog
05-08-2007, 01:48 AM
Part of the problem is that your eyes got progressively worse over years, and you brain adapted. It "learned" where things were supposed to be, based on the optical inputs. Adaptive learning. Now, in a matter of seconds, you put things back "where they are supposed to be". But your brain is still correcting. I've noticed similar effects, though less jarring, every time I got a new prescription. Within a day or two, it would be gone. If you've had severe astigmatism for years, it may take a week or more to adapt. You can also have the doc correct your vision with the astigmatism correction and just let your brain keep doing the corrections...

Evan
05-08-2007, 02:04 AM
It's worse than that. Astigmatism untreated doesn't cause a scale difference between eyes. The correction in the lens, called 'wedge', does. So, the brain is faced with a new situation where the eyes see the same thing at different apparent sizes. It isn't guaranteed that the brain can adapt to that.

Mike W
05-08-2007, 03:01 AM
I have worn glasses since I was 18 for distance. I used to be able to read with them on. Now I have to take them off to read and I can do without them except for driving. I once went to work with my sunglasses and forgot the clear pair. At night, I tried without but ended up using the sunglasses. After that, I made sure that I always had both pair with me.

Tony
05-08-2007, 06:50 AM
On the bright side, I'm turning tapers like never before! ;)

for anyone whos still interested (i'm new to these things),
heres what i think is happening.. and why i'm seeing trapezoids
everywhere.

my left eye is weak.. astigmatic +2.5 or something like that
my right eye is fine.

my doc tells me that i've been reading-seeing with my right
eye.. and brain has been correcting. he says i probably tend
to rotate my head to the left.. to get my right eye closer.

if he's right.. my brain used to see some mild perspective
(right eye is closer.. but i'm looking straight on.. like at a computer
screen)

images in my right eye were bigger, because things were closer.
but my brain fixed the interpretation.

now that i have glasses.. and the world is straight again
my brain is still shrinking the right image as it was before.

anyway, this is only my theory.
these glasses are troublesome.. but this is some neat stuff.

-Tony

Evan
05-08-2007, 08:59 AM
The eye doc is blowing smoke. It's a simple optical difference between the lenses in the glasses which I am unfortunately very familiar with. Astigmatism is caused by the eye not being exactly spherical causing a distortion in a particular axis. It doesn't change the focal length. The correction in the lens does change the focal length and therefor the image scale. Changing the angle of your head doesn't make enough difference to alter image scale in any noticeable way. Any very slight difference that may make is automatically compensated by the brain in everyone, whether or not you have astigmatism.

Tony
05-08-2007, 11:19 AM
Evan,
You sound very convincing.. I think I trust you more than my eye doctor.

Based on what I've described in these last few posts, do you think my
prescription might be wrong? Ie I shouldnt be seeing this distortion?

Thanks again.
-Tony

OneOldCat
05-08-2007, 12:57 PM
I think some of you folks aren't quite on-track, here.

Tony, I don't know what kind of "eye doctor" you've been seeing - but, based on your description, you should find and consult with an opthalmologist or, at worst, an optometrist - the opthalmologist is best; he/she is a genuine Doctor. A good opthalmologist (or optometrist) should be able to give you what you need - whoever you've been seeing, it doesn't sound like they're able to do that, not if you're still having this sort of distortion after more than a day or two.

Astigmatism is not due to the shape of the eyeball itself - elongation or contraction of the eyeball's overall shape generally causes nearsightedness (myopia) in the case of elongation or farsightedness (hyperopia) in the case of contraction.

Astigmatism is caused by variation of the shape of the cornea, the clear, flexible dome-shape at the very front of the eye that covers, protects and helps to focus the lens. A normal cornea is perfectly or nearly perfectly round - astigmatism occurs when the cornea, for whatever reason, is more oval-shaped, whether uniformly or irregularly so.

Astigmatism happens because the oval shape of the cornea generates two different focal areas on the retina, inside the back of the eyeball (due to the oval shape having two different curvatures) instead of the one focal area formed by a normally-shaped cornea. This is why some astigmatism can be corrected with corneal reshaping - and why virtually all astigmatism can be corrected by external lenses, either contact lenses or, more commonly, eyeglasses.

Age-related astigmatism occurs when, as people get older, their corneas lose their flexibility and tend to dry out and to flatten or distort, and therefore become more oval, at the same time losing some of their ability to assist the lens in focusing the viewed images on a single area of the retina. This sort of astigmatism is also correctible, but may be accompanied by the need for distance correction. Tony's "eye doc" may be overdoing this distance correction, based on his description.

There is no fixed age at which people's eyes are subject to age-related astigmatism - although, in general, middle-age and beyond is when it occurs for most.

No, I'm not an "eye doc" - but I've worn eyeglasses, due to myopia, since the age of 7 (tried contacts once, years ago, didn't work for me)...and my 64th birthday was last month. I started having a small but noticeable amount of astigmatism (left eye only) about 7 - 8 years ago - my opthalmologist tells me I now have the beginnings of a cataract in that same eye. I'm pro-active about my sight, and careful to know all I can - I've got to be; I've only got one set of eyes, I feel like I need and want to keep both of them, and unlike wine they're not getting any better with age.

I read up, asked a lot of questions...and changed "eye docs" a couple of times when I didn't get answers that made sense. You're responsible for your own eyesight, in the end, just like with anything else about your health. If you need vision correction of any kind, at any age, you also need to know as much as you can find out about why you need that correction. If something isn't working right, find out why - or, find a new (and better) "eye person".:D

Sorry this ran so long - but I feel eyesight is pretty important stuff - I don't know too many blind machinists.:o

Your Old Dog
05-08-2007, 01:14 PM
I have developed a slight astigmatism according to one of the optometrist I saw. She fitted me with new glasses and i damn near puked every evening in low light when I looked down and the earth moved in front of me almost like watching a river go by.

I lived with that for two years thinking there was nothing i could do about it. Not only that, but after she did her magic I began seeing the trapezoids.

I go to different doctor two years later and she says you have astigmatism but your previous doctor over corrected it for you. Her scripts is perfect and now I don't have any problems.

Evan
05-08-2007, 02:21 PM
Astigmatism is caused by variation of the shape of the cornea,

Yes, you are right. The fact remains that it doesn't change the focal length of the eye or the image scale.


You sound very convincing.. I think I trust you more than my eye doctor.

No need to trust me on this. This is what the ophthalmologist told me.


Based on what I've described in these last few posts, do you think my prescription might be wrong? Ie I shouldnt be seeing this distortion?

While the prescription may or may not be wrong the distortion is a consequence of the type of correction, even if the prescription is correct. I simply ended up telling them to leave out the astigmatism correction as I couldn't adjust to it.

pcarpenter
05-08-2007, 03:08 PM
One other possible cause of poor correction from glasses is that a lot of the vision care places are pushing high-index plastics...you know the extra light weight or thinner materials. One of the local chains uses the term "Featherweights". Good thing they have a guarantee because I let them talk me into trying them again...only to have them remake my scrip in a more traditional plastic (which is softer and therefore requires a scratch-resistant coating).

The biggest source of trouble for me, with these was chromatic aberrations (look at a light-dark transition like a telephone pole and see several colors...like a prism) at the transition. There were other things about them that nearly gave me a headache trying to adapt, but the poor sharpness and the feeling that I was looking at everything through a prism was really annoying. They gave me the usual...."most people get used to them." I told them that anything that reduced the quality of my vision was nothing that I *should* get used to. I use my eyes for far too important purposes than to live with having what is supposed to be improving my vision make it worse in some other way. The problem stems from trying to bend light too tightly (thus the low-index of refractivity) and that they are just less than perfect at re-focusing all wavelengths at the same point apparently.

Anyhow...just another data point and something that may explain what you are seeing.

Paul

gunbuilder
05-16-2007, 11:01 PM
Hi,
I have a saying "Not all doctors graduated at the top of their class." I believe they just have to graduate and pass state boards. I have seen it too many times, doctors making mistakes. I could list a few if anyone is interested.

If your glasses are giving you a problem tell the doctor or the person you got them from. I had a pair for reading and a pair for distance made, guess what one lens from each was interchanged. The reading pair had one for reading and one for distance, the distance pair had one for reading. That one was a "lab" screw-up.

Thanks,
Paul

oldtiffie
05-17-2007, 07:19 AM
I think some of you folks aren't quite on-track, here.

Tony, I don't know what kind of "eye doctor" you've been seeing - but, based on your description, you should find and consult with an opthalmologist or, at worst, an optometrist - the opthalmologist is best; he/she is a genuine Doctor. A good opthalmologist (or optometrist) should be able to give you what you need - whoever you've been seeing, it doesn't sound like they're able to do that, not if you're still having this sort of distortion after more than a day or two.

...............

You're responsible for your own eyesight, in the end, just like with anything else about your health. If you need vision correction of any kind, at any age, you also need to know as much as you can find out about why you need that correction. If something isn't working right, find out why - or, find a new (and better) "eye person".:D

Sorry this ran so long - but I feel eyesight is pretty important stuff - I don't know too many blind machinists.:o

"Spot on" OneOld Cat.

I trust my Opthamologist and Optometrist absolutely - they get it right every time, explain what is wrong and what the solutions and chances and outcomes are and answer any questions I have.

I will be damned if I will attemp to diagnose or "doctor" myself. I leave that to the professionals. Get it wrong and there is no going back.

In the same vein, because I am a Fitter and Machinist and an "Engineering Tradesman" does NOT make me an Engineer nor should nor will I call myself one nor should I give adcice as if I am one.

Same goes for "Doctoring"

If I had a choice, my eye-sight would be the absolute last thing I'd want to lose. I could get by without hearing (I wear hearing aids too) or loss of smell or taste (lost most of those with trimeningel neuralgia).

Yeah, well forget the other "must have/do at all costs" bit as age (70) and a Prostate cancer removal operation 2 1/2 years ago (succesful) saw to that. If nothing else it has assured some people who thought (and some still do) that it was caused by too much of a certain activity that my Mother warned me would send me blind.

I got caught up in a "road rage" effort some years ago and got a shard of window glass right through the pupil of my left eye and a few punches in it as well didn't help. The Police, Ambulance people, my local Doctor and Opthamologist and Optometrist were absolute marvels both as a team and individually and I can't tell you how grateful to them I am. And they are all as happy a s**t that it worked for me.

The Opthamologist told me that with the glasses he prescribed that my vision would be distorted but my brain knew what it was meant to see and would process the messages from my eyes into a composite signal so that my mind would see correctly - but it would take time - and so it turned out to be.

I wear 2 sets of glasses. I have them checked every 2 years and I wear them all the time - took some getting used to but its a total success.

One set are bi-focals ("transitional" treated for glare) for general use and driving (they are "magic" in reducing road glare at night) and the other pair are single lens "reading" glasses for welding and for using the computer - and they both work a treat.

I can read 4-point text (ie "Bible text"??) with both eyes without too much problem.

The bi-focals are only a minor irritance at times - especially with the "Super-market "top/bottom shelf"" bit. They are a PIA when working under the car and similar. They can be an irritance at night driving when switching vision from the road (top lens) to the dash-board (lower lens) but I'm well used to that. And they are a real risk and useless in the workshop with welding - "stick", MIG, oxy-acet etc. as there is a real "flash" if and when the welding glare hits the "lap/ridge" between the lenses - so I have to use the single lens "reading" glasses and they work 100%.

I can usually get by with the bi-focals on the lathe and grinders and general work-shop jobs but I often use the "reading" glasses as well.

I hope this helps.