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View Full Version : 2007 NAMES -Sherline Machinist's Challenge



Weston Bye
04-23-2007, 05:35 PM
Here are the first and second place entries, both by a fellow from India. By the way, he presented the lathe to the Sherline museum.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/Weston/apr21003.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/Weston/apr21004.jpg


Here is my own entry that took third place. I was astonished. There were other entries with better workmanship, but mostly engines of some sort. I suppose that maybe the subject matter -something different from the usual- helped. The entries are judged by the attenders to NAMES. Sherline provides a dollar per vote, up to $2500. Each voter has to vote for 5 entries. This year there were only 9 entries. Edit to add: They provide 100 votes for each entry so the total purse this year was only $900.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/Weston/apr21009.jpg
I post this here not so much to brag, (well maybe a little) but to encourage the rest of you to enter a project.

Also, this project is in the most recent issue of the Digital Machinist.

PTSideshow
04-23-2007, 06:17 PM
Way to go Wes, I'm glad you did as the picture I took is on my missing memory stick. Can't remember what I did with it!:D so post the rest of your pictures.

Mcgyver
04-23-2007, 06:54 PM
congrats Wes!

Rich Carlstedt
04-23-2007, 07:08 PM
Glenn
Wait a minite..you don't remember where your memory stick is..
That is really bad....mmmmmm

NAMES
After talking to you at the show, my wife had a urgent health problem
and I left in a big hurry to get home.
Hope to see you next year
Rich

PTSideshow
04-23-2007, 08:39 PM
Yep rich it is, if you have a current picture of the engine post it I didn't get a chance to get one before you left.

Joel
04-23-2007, 09:26 PM
Way to go Wes!

PolskiFran
04-23-2007, 10:14 PM
Brag away! It is nice to see someone from the board receive recognition.
Frank

fixxit
05-10-2007, 04:16 PM
Wes,
I recently subscribed to Digital Machinist. I started with the Spring 2007 issue.
I found your project really interesting.
I wanted to learn more about the quartz clock movemenet driving the clock.

I tried to obtain a copy of the first part of your article in the Winter 2006 issue of Digital Machinist, but the Village Press said that they were all sold out. They said that they do not reprint sold out issues, and they had no plans to issue the magazine on CD.

Could you post some pictures and details?

Thanks
Fixxit

Weston Bye
05-10-2007, 07:14 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/Weston/Photo22.jpg

The quartz movement is basically a crude stepper motor. The rotor is just a steel disk, notched with the side of an endmill, leaving 15 evenly spaced poles. One of the coils will be aligned with a pole, two will be half aligned and the fourth will be aligned with the gap between two poles on the rotor. The four coils are energized sequentially counter clockwise at 1 second intervals. The combination of poles and coils yield 15 x 4 = 60, or 1 RPM, clockwise. Each coil was 1320 turns of #32 magnet wire wound on a Delrin bobbin on a steel pole piece.
Control is provided by a couple of CMOS chips, the first, a CD4060 oscillator/divider, feeding a CD4022 1-of-8 decoder. Four of the outputs from the decoder feed four power FETs to drive the coils. A 32.768Khz quartz (hence the Quartz Movement title) crystal and a few resistors and capacitors complete the circuit. You could indeed substitute a C (microcontroller) to drive the four transistors, but you might spend a little more money and certainly will spend extra time programming the C.

These are the basics of the Quartz Movement. Perhaps more later.

S_J_H
05-10-2007, 08:06 PM
I enjoyed your article on the clock in the mag. Very nice work! Congrats!

Steve

m_kilde
05-11-2007, 09:54 AM
Hi Wes

Love your contraption !

Being mostly an engine builder my self, I sure would concider doing projects in new directions, anyone can see that the challenge and need for work (and use of the home shop machinery) is similar to the more conventionel engine building

I do not get the Digital magazine, but It's easy to see that your project must have been great fun.

Again, your clock looks great

Weston Bye
05-11-2007, 05:17 PM
Hi Wes

Love your contraption !

Being mostly an engine builder my self, I sure would concider doing projects in new directions, anyone can see that the challenge and need for work (and use of the home shop machinery) is similar to the more conventionel engine building

I do not get the Digital magazine, but It's easy to see that your project must have been great fun.

Again, your clock looks great

Contraption Indeed! I take that as a complement.
In the article I mentioned a short story by Mark Twain. Go read it:

http://www.4literature.net/Mark_Twain/My_Watch/

In it he recounts the mishaps in having his watch repaired by a series of failed tradesmen that moved on to watchmaking and repair. As I reported in the article, my own background is in automation and manufacturing machinery, and that perhaps it showed in the (bizarre?) construction of the clock.

Perhaps someday I will build an engine.

japcas
05-12-2007, 01:32 AM
Great looking work Wes. Thanks for sharing the pictures and contributing. Way over my head in the electrical part but still interesting for me.

Evan
05-12-2007, 03:43 AM
Very interesting work Wes. I still have plans to build an orrery one of these days and something similar would make a good drive mechanism. In the case of an orrery the pulse rate would be low enough that solar power should be feasible.

If you are looking for a real challenge in building an engine how about building a Steam Clock. I have seen the one in Vancouver many times. It is the first known clock to run successfully from steam and even today only one other exists.

http://www.zanzig.com/travel/canpix/m002-04.htm