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Fasttrack
05-06-2007, 11:34 AM
How do you know when water-soluble coolant has gone bad? Just a bad smell... or?


I went to use some of mine after sitting for several months and instead of the milky white it had been, it was more translucent with brown "beads" floating in it. It looked like the oil had seperated from the water. I tried shaking it up but it didn't help. It also smells like kersosene which makes think its contaminated, not spoiled.

But i figured i should ask anyway...

jimmstruk
05-06-2007, 11:41 AM
Very normal, the oil separates with time, also the water evaporates. I add some water and stir to restore. If it smells bad clean the sump and start over. The experts say never to add water. JIM

tattoomike68
05-06-2007, 12:27 PM
Just add some pine-sol to it. If you dont want the stuff in your mill or lathe keep it for use in a bandsaw. Thats what we do with old smelly stuff.

madman
05-06-2007, 04:43 PM
Hey if it reeks like ****in **** its gone bad . Wasnt that easy???

Fasttrack
05-06-2007, 09:04 PM
Woo! my thread got five stars! :D


Thanks guys; it doesn't smell bad at all. I really think it got kerosene mixed in with it. I made a little tray that slopes downward towards a bit of plastic tubing that drains into a quart oil bottle. I've got another quart bottle with a spout in it so i just dump coolant on whatever i'm doing and then swap out the bottles when the one with the spout is empty. I also clean the machine periodically with kerosene and of course oil it afterwards. I'm guessing somehow the fresh oil and kerosene residue got washed down into the coolant.

cybor462
05-06-2007, 11:47 PM
You know it's bad when there are more dead bugs floating in it than in the septic puddle in the back yard.

Or when you break out in red blotches when it spashes on your arm, or when you notice your hair falling out, or your finger nails turn brown a split.:eek:

Swarf&Sparks
05-07-2007, 12:09 AM
the "brown beads" may just be tramp oil. IE, non-soluble oil carried over from your machine and workpieces.

jkeyser14
05-07-2007, 12:49 AM
You know it's bad when there are more dead bugs floating in it than in the septic puddle in the back yard.

Or when you break out in red blotches when it spashes on your arm, or when you notice your hair falling out, or your finger nails turn brown a split.:eek:

The coolant used in the machines here at school gives me a rash, even when it's brand new (I know because I just replaced all the coolant on a VMC and flushed all lines this week). Water soluable cutting fluids will tell you that they are a skin irritant if you actually read the labels, but each person will react differently to them.

The brown spots on top of the coolant could be two things, bacteria or tramp oil. Either way, skim it off the surface and you should still be good to go. For my own machine, I stuck a fish tank aerator (bubbler) in the coolant tank to make sure it gets plenty of oxygen to kill any bacteria. I haven't changed the coolant on my own machine in two years.

HTRN
05-07-2007, 08:22 AM
The coolant used in the machines here at school gives me a rash, even when it's brand new (I know because I just replaced all the coolant on a VMC and flushed all lines this week). Water soluable cutting fluids will tell you that they are a skin irritant if you actually read the labels, but each person will react differently to them.

I've generally found that the synthetic based water soluable oil generally gives rashes more than mineral oil based. It's easy to tell - see what the mix ratio is - generally synthetics have something like 20:1 or greater, while mineral oil based is anywhere from 5-10:1. Mineral oil also generally looks like new motor oil, while Synthetics can be almost any color - bright blue is a common one.

I have found that Blaser Swisslube (http://www.blaser.com/index.cfm?type=start&navid=455&land=us), one of the best mineral based water soluables generally gives the least amount of "machinist disease"(contact dermatitis). Unfortunately, it isn't like Rustlick where you can order it from MSC - you have to go to a local dealer. Ain't cheap either - they generally want to sell you a 55 gallon drum, although they do have 5 gallon pails..


HTRN

Ken_Shea
05-07-2007, 10:03 AM
I have never had any coolant go bad, ever...........

Mostly open machine, a front with door, closed sides and full open back, it gets slung every where and just has to be replaced :D

I have been meaning to do something about that !

Fasttrack
05-07-2007, 09:26 PM
:D

Hahaha yeah i know what you mean Ken!

Liger Zero
05-08-2007, 04:21 AM
I use a refractometer to check the coolant on my Million Dollar Belt-Sander at work. We had problems with it rusting out when we ran the specified coolant at the specified strength, now I use an unholy mixture of oil, Syntilo and Hamikleer running at a 4 to 6 on the refractometer.

Been working on the same batch for three months, aside from makeup water it doesn't develop a smell or get cloudy.