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Evan
05-08-2007, 02:07 PM
One of the projects I have built in the last month is a bender. This is similar in principle to a Hossfeld but with a somewhat different design. I have never even used a bender before but I see no reason to let that stop me. It has worked out rather well.

The main "chassis" is a 12" x 12" x 15 chunk of scrap H-beam that was laying about in a friend's junk pile for the last few decades. It took quite a while to clean up. Sched 40 legs make it into a stand with feet that can drop over rails to secure it or it may be bolted down to anchors.

http://vts.bc.ca/pics2/bender1.jpg

Parts are hot rolled steel with the scale removed. Bender pins are 1040 steel heat treated and drawn to spring temper. The right angle bending die is mild steel case hardened. The smaller rolling dies are 1040, hardened. The square bending shoes are mild steel. The big round die is nylatron.

I still have a lot more dies to make and will whip them up as the need arises.

http://vts.bc.ca/pics2/bender2.jpg

The table has a hole circle for bending stops every 15 degrees and is marked every 5 degrees. The BFH standing beside the bender is for bending thick work such as the sample on the table.

http://vts.bc.ca/pics2/bender3.jpg

The reason for building this device is to do some decorative iron work. My first ever bending project and also first ever decorative iron work is this gate. It's a pet gate to keep the beardog in the mud room when she is wet and/or muddy. It replaces the junky plywood half door we have had for about 20 years.

http://vts.bc.ca/pics2/bendergate.jpg

mklotz
05-08-2007, 02:36 PM
Beautiful work, Evan - both the bender and the gate.

Could you send me a six-pack of those drugs you are taking? :)

ptjw7uk
05-08-2007, 03:08 PM
Very, very nice work Evan.
Have fun with all that bending and not a bad back in site!!
pETER

OneOldCat
05-08-2007, 05:24 PM
Now, that is, without a doubt, true artistry in metal...and the gate looks fantastic, too!!

That is, flat-out, the best use of a piece of castoff H-beam I've ever seen...outstanding work, all around.:D

Mcgyver
05-08-2007, 06:11 PM
very nice job Evan

Lew Hartswick
05-08-2007, 06:30 PM
And dig the knobs on the end of those pins. :-)
...lew...

mochinist
05-08-2007, 06:56 PM
Beautiful work, Evan - both the bender and the gate.

Could you send me a six-pack of those drugs you are taking? :)I think the drug may be known as "speed":eek:

Your Old Dog
05-08-2007, 07:08 PM
that baby looks stout enough to bend railroad track !! Really nice job Evan.

Ries
05-08-2007, 07:20 PM
Your basic concept and execution is great- quite elegant.

However, it looks as if you copied some of your bending principles from the shop outfitters/ harbor freight benders, rather than a true hossfeld.

For some reason, when shop outfitters copied the hossfeld, the omitted several of the features that make a hossfeld work so well.

One is the clamping/versus rolling dies.

On your bender, you have a round die on the center pin, a round die fixed on the frame, and a square die on the swinging arm. This is backwards from the way hossfeld does it, and they do it the way they do it for a reason.

They use a square die fixed on the frame. Then, the dies they put on the center pin are not round, but teardrop shaped, with the flat part bearing against the square die fixed on the frame. The round die goes on the swinging arm.
This means the stock gets held in place between the two flat dies, and the round die on the swinging arm spins as it bends, allowing the bend to take place with material on the swinging arm. This way, you can use fixed length stops on the frame, and get repeatable bends every time.

Shop outfitters, and subsequently the chinese, skipped this because it was easier to make round dies instead of teardrops.

The other thing they did is make fancy ball ends on their pins- this looks cool, but ignores the fact that the top of the frame is as useful for bending as inside the frame- in fact I would say I bend more on top of the frame than inside. Especially for things like round bar.
I would suggest making another set of pins that are extra long, one center pin, and one for the fixed frame and one for the swinging frame. The swinging frame pin needs to have a small bump, or weld bead, to keep it from dropping thru the hole. This enables you to bend complicated shapes up top, with lots of reverse bends or other features that would hit the frame if put inside.
Then, you will want to copy the hossfeld die that is adjustable for tension on top- like this- using 3" pieces of different diameter pipe, you can wind circles, or springs, in many sizes- this is 3/8" round, and about 3" pipe, but all kinds of tricks are possible with this style of die.
The hossfeld people really thought long and hard about their benders, and there is a lot more to them than those silly chinese have copied so far.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/rniemi/hossfeld3.jpg

Here is a teardrop die- this is one I made, for a 4" radius circle, by welding up pieces of 1/4" plate. Hossfeld sells them from 1 1/2" diameter up to about 9".
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/rniemi/hossfeld5.jpg

Evan
05-08-2007, 10:26 PM
Thanks for the hints Ries. As I said, I haven't used a bender before. However, I am not having any trouble getting repeatable bends. It draws the material from the part that sticks past center and I can use stops on the hole circle to get very repeatable bends and sizes. It depends upon the square pulling dies having more friction than the rolling dies. For that reason I have ground the surface of the square dies with a coarse finish. Seems to work.

I have considered bending on top as well. No problem with the pins dropping through as the bottom holes are blind.

My next project which I have just started is a picket twister. I have all the materials including some parts to make an obscenely overbuilt headstock. :D

Thanks for the nice comments guys. I have just installed the gate and it looks like a great grate. Has anybody noticed the theme of the gate? My wife saw it immediately.

BadDog
05-08-2007, 11:13 PM
Looks grate Evan! ;)

Hearts in all but 3 blocks...

Evan
05-09-2007, 12:59 AM
I think the drug may be known as "speed"

Nope, it's better. It's a dopamine agonist. :D

J. Randall
05-09-2007, 01:56 AM
Could be hearts, but for some reason my thoughts drifted towards female anatomy, might be wrong there to.
James

Your Old Dog
05-09-2007, 07:23 AM
Has anybody noticed the theme of the gate? My wife saw it immediately.

I wasn't gonna say anything! It's very Martha Stewart but I'll let you plead that the hearts inspiration came from muzzle loaders cause that's the kind of guy I am! :D

Evan
05-09-2007, 07:40 AM
Could be hearts, but for some reason my thoughts drifted towards female anatomy, might be wrong there to.

Have you ever noticed that a lot of ornamental ironwork is rather, umm, "suggestive"? Often lots of long pointy things with heads on them when the gate is guarding something, but usually a lot of soft curves when it represents a portal that may be opened to satisfy some desire.

I didn't want it to look like a portcullis. It was designed to be a part of the house and to appeal to my wife.

However, If I ever build a gate for the driveway it will have plenty of long pointy things with heads... :D

Your Old Dog
05-09-2007, 08:20 AM
so you'll leave Bear Dog to carry the portcullis message? LOL What we're saying here is look how lovely this place looks, you are invited to come on in and then it falls on Bear Dog to gnaw on them? Does Bear Dog know this?

Evan
05-09-2007, 08:33 AM
Does Bear Dog know this?

It is her mission in life. She is an excellent judge of character too. My wife was recently hiring an office assistant and one thing that none of the interviewees realize is that they must pass the Beardog Approval Test. Beardog goes to work with my wife nearly every day and hangs around the office. When somebody comes in she will react immediately depending on what she thinks of them. Her reaction isn't automatic and will vary from "ho hum" to offering to provide impromptu limb removal.

davidfe
05-09-2007, 07:57 PM
Evan,

Here is is a little more stylized gate.

Perhaps round two.


http://i115.photobucket.com/albums/n319/davidfe/FrenchArtDecoGate.jpg


DFE

Evan
05-09-2007, 09:13 PM
Heh. I don't think so. I'm building another right now for outside. It's a plain rancher style with only a little flourish at the top. It's going really quick and should be done tommorrow. The only thing slowing me down is that I have to gas weld it all because I'm using thinwall tubing.

Peter Sanders
05-09-2007, 09:18 PM
Hi

I *LIKE* it :D

I have considered making a bender like this and have looked for plans but not yet found any good plans. Do you have any plans or at least hole placement?

Ok, whats the theme? Swan Lake :D

Evan
05-09-2007, 09:23 PM
Sorry, I don't 'do' plans for most things. It all lives in my head in 3D.

The theme is intended to be hearts.

abn
05-10-2007, 02:22 AM
Super Duper work as usual!!!

lugnut
05-10-2007, 05:22 PM
Peter, If you email me your email address I will send you a set of plans for bender of this type. I downloaded them several years ago thinking I would build a bender, but bought one from HF. The file is 35 pages and about 2.6 Megs. It's one of the most complete set of plans that I have seen.
Hop this helps
Mel:)

Peter Sanders
05-10-2007, 09:57 PM
Hi

Sorry, I don't 'do' plans for most things. It all lives in my head in 3D.
Same here :D - great isn't it.

Peter Sanders
05-10-2007, 10:01 PM
Hi

Peter, If you email me your email address I will send you a set of plans for bender of this type. I downloaded them several years ago thinking I would build a bender, but bought one from HF. The file is 35 pages and about 2.6 Megs. It's one of the most complete set of plans that I have seen.
Hop this helps
Mel:)

Done! Thank you

Dawai
05-11-2007, 02:43 PM
The theme is intended to be hearts.
__________________
Fugit irreparabile tempus.
<end quote>
Snicker*
He said his Limbido was more active, that usually means more HONEY_DO jobs to keep the wife happy.. Good for you Evan.. I am proud you are feeling better too.

My gates I built outa junk, needed painting about a year back.. now they are installed it is up to me to brush them.. that'll be interesting since the dog got epoxy on him while I was painting the bike.. Junk looks good when welded up and painted.. even rich people can't afford things like that..

Evan
05-11-2007, 03:48 PM
Both the gates I have built so far are largely built from scrap. There is no reason to throw out perfectly good material that can be made into something useful.

wirewrkr
05-11-2007, 03:54 PM
Plans!?!?! we don't need no steenking plans!
My pop used to bitch at me alla time for building stuff in my head and adapting as I went along. Works for me too.
I did lousy in Philosophy classes because I am a "picture" thinker.
Good looking piece Evan, I will someday figure out my camera and shoot some of the pics for you guys of my shop and some of the odd things that have become other odd things.
Robert

Evan
05-12-2007, 08:48 AM
I haven't shown yet some of the odd bits I have put together while furnishing my new fabrication shop (the garage). I'll take a few pics this weekend.

Bill in Ky
05-12-2007, 11:30 AM
Very nice job!

Jaymo
05-13-2007, 01:51 AM
My guess is either breasts or buns. They look like both to me.

Doc Nickel
05-13-2007, 07:24 AM
Peter, If you email me your email address I will send you a set of plans for bender of this type. I downloaded them several years ago thinking I would build a bender, but bought one from HF. The file is 35 pages and about 2.6 Megs. It's one of the most complete set of plans that I have seen.
Hop this helps
Mel:)

-May hop on that bandwagon? "doc" at "docsmachine" dotcom, thanks.
Doc.

Orrin
05-13-2007, 08:38 AM
Evan, both the gate and the bender are elegant. How does that saying go, the one about a person's workmanship being a reflection of his character ?

Best regards,

Orrin