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View Full Version : Interesting indexable lathe stop



applescotty
05-21-2007, 04:59 PM
There was an interesting indexable lathe stop on ebay that ended today:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=200109824537

Has anyone ever seen one like this? It looks like it could be either factory or shop made, hard to tell. Seems like it would be an interesting project to make.

Scott

John Stevenson
05-21-2007, 05:05 PM
That's neat, saved the pic and it's in the 'to do' drawer :D


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IOWOLF
05-21-2007, 05:07 PM
Reasonable price also.

oldtiffie
05-21-2007, 09:56 PM
There was an interesting indexable lathe stop on ebay that ended today:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=200109824537

Has anyone ever seen one like this? It looks like it could be either factory or shop made, hard to tell. Seems like it would be an interesting project to make.

Scott

Thanks Scott - both for the info and the "seed" for a new train of thought.

I am not much good at "original" thought but I do fairly well in picking up and idea and going on from there. This is a good case in point - many thanks.

I've used these sort of things adapted for lathes (either mounted on the apron or the bed) and on milling machines. They work really well provided they/you have the "proper feel" and the machine is brought up to them by "hand" and "touched" gently. The degrees of accuracy and repeatability can be remarkable high with use. But with all that "banging' and whatever, they need to be checked and re-set fairly frequently as a decent "bump" can "move" the as with many items in '"machine/set-up work".

Get absent-minded and hit them with the machine auto-feed on and its a recipe for either a "re-think", a "re-do" or a new job.

The principle was used for axial settings on (manual) turret/capstan lathes and it worked well. No "auto-stop" or "CNC" then as it was all "mandraulic" and on repetition work could be as boring as hell.

I once saw the principle used on the x an y axis on a mill where it sort of emulated CNC as the machine was fed up to the stops in sequence and then then expected "clamp/unclamp" of table lock screws was required. Mostly conventional milling but with care and tightened gibs even climb milling (light cuts) was possible - but that is where is ended - but the mental concentration was considerable.

A simple but effective variation is to have an inverted "vee" (angle iron) fixed to the apron or body of the lathe/mill and have adjustable and readily removable "spacer bars" inserted and removed as necessary - and it works just as well as the item in the e-bay article - and its a lot easier and quicker to make and fit.

I hope this helps.

Evan
05-21-2007, 11:45 PM
Interesting. I was just contemplating making an indexing attachment for the lead screw on my South Bend 9. As I already have an electric drive attached to the rightmost end it would be easy to place a crank with an index plate in that location temporarily as an attachment. What brought this up is that I have a little job to do for a friend making a custom elevating rack for his old drill press and this would seem an easy way to go about it.

pntrbl
05-22-2007, 12:30 AM
Never seen nuthin' like it and I'm not even sure I know what it does! LOL!

Arm on top is the clamping device? Drum looking thing has multiple moving blocks? Shaft on the bottom uses the blocks to set a stop?

Why in the world would anybody need that many stops?

The reason I ask is I've found with the clutch on my 11' Logan I like working up against a stop. The feedlever on the thing is so cumbersome and clumsy I find it easier to just use the clutch to initiate feeds. When I'm gonna run it into a stop I set the clutch tension (read turn the knob) for just enough to get the carriage moving. Hasn't moved a stop yet.

I should say it hasn't moved the only stop I own yet. And it's actually a dial mount. :) With the DTI out and gage blocks to set a dimension I get such a bulletproof setup even I can't mess it up.

So I'm interested in stops. Banging a clutch into one works real good.

SP

applescotty
05-22-2007, 10:40 AM
It appears that if you attached the rod to the carriage, having two stops would then allow you to set a limit going both directions, instead of just towards the headstock, like a normal stop would.

Scott

kap pullen
05-22-2007, 12:48 PM
Might make a good quill stop for the Bridgeport mill as well!

Kap

John Stevenson
05-24-2007, 12:52 PM
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/stevenson.engineers/lsteve/files/carriage%20stop.jpg

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TECHSHOP
05-24-2007, 06:50 PM
Since I can't seem to raise the signal from the "land of dead links". I have to look over the CAD(?) drawing by John Stevenson. Ok, so now I have enough info to build one, but I don't understand how it is used (I'd say "mount it", but that will likely spin this tread OT). Anybody help?

I think John Stevenson has one made while I typed this post.

applescotty
05-24-2007, 07:25 PM
Here's the photo that was in the eBay listing
http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y141/applescotty/misc/974e_1.jpg

Scott

oldtiffie
05-25-2007, 07:01 AM
I suspect that it has got "punch-cards" and a "pianola" way back in the dark corners of it's dubious heritage.

Perhaps John got it out from his dungeon in Nottingham Castle - and it has got what looks like a thumb-screw on it - and I can almost hear the multiple "Stops" emanating therefrom (the Dungeon that is).

I hope Maid Marion is not down there with her leather outfit, whip, rack and all.

I saw the bars on the window of John's workshop-cum-office on a recent post and it did not seem too unlike the "Keep" in an English castle.

You wouldn't be the Sheriff would you John?

"King John" perhaps?

The "goings on" in Sherbrooke Forest were always of interest to me.

Me in leotards? - not a good look - at all.

J. Randall
05-26-2007, 01:21 AM
Oldtiffie, I like a good off topic post as much as the next guy, but from what I read on the majority of your posts they have very little to do with the topic. Not trying to offend you, just think we could do with a little less of the rambling.
James

oldtiffie
05-26-2007, 03:15 AM
Oldtiffie, I like a good off topic post as much as the next guy, but from what I read on the majority of your posts they have very little to do with the topic. Not trying to offend you, just think we could do with a little less of the rambling.
James

Noted.

Admonished.

Will comply.

John Stevenson
05-26-2007, 06:21 AM
Time to fess up, small son drew this up in Solid Edge with a few mods from the photo.

I was initially interested but on looking at where it would fit on my lathe [s] I realised that I have no room to put one.
Because they have H shaped aprons when they are close to the chuck there is only enough room for the little stubby micrometer stops I have on at present.

My big TOS has the front vee exposed all the way thru but the screwcutting gearbox bolts to that so this lathe is also out. I dare say there are some out there that can use one of these but if you have to work close up to the chuck, then for me having to swap from this one to a micrometer stop is wasting time.

Nice concept and worth filing away for future use.

.

Michael Moore
05-26-2007, 07:45 PM
I took a quick photo of the accessories page from the parts manual for my Mori Seiki MS850. This shows exploded views of the standard micrometer stop, the rear toolpost (the cross slide has dovetails on the edges that the tool post clamps to) and an indexible stop with 6 positions.

http://www.eurospares.com/graphics/metalwork/msaccessories.jpg

I hope that proves of some interest to someone.

cheers,
Michael

wierdscience
05-26-2007, 08:21 PM
Neat,allows multiple setups to be saved for future use.Also has the possiblity of multiple cylinders being made interchangeable.The analog machine shop version of a flash drive:D