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View Full Version : Power hacksaw : Are they still made?



Mike Burdick
04-24-2003, 10:08 PM
I was wondering if they still made power hacksaws. If they still do, could someone suggest a good brand and maybe a link to the manufacturer.

Thanks,

Mike

wierdscience
04-24-2003, 10:16 PM
If you are talking small I think so,maybe JET.But I have to ask why do you want one?They are after all kinda slow.My money would go to a good bandsaw.Just a thought.

Mike Burdick
04-24-2003, 10:41 PM
Well not too small. I was thinking of something that would cut 4" bar stock.

I just wanted to check them out. A friend of mine has a real 'oldie' and it sure makes some nice cuts...although, as you said, it's slow.

Robert Jones
04-24-2003, 11:00 PM
Keller Industries still makes them. No website but do a google search for their number. Hold on to your wallet!

They also make die filers.

Bobby

jfsmith
04-24-2003, 11:06 PM
I have a power hacksaw that somebody gave to me last year. It was made in the 1950s, uses 8 inch blades, and looks like it had very little use when I got it. I cut and punched a bunch of blades and now it's a workhorse for me.

The only thing that it needs is a starter cap, other wise I have to give it a little push.

Jerry

jfsmith
04-24-2003, 11:08 PM
I forgot to mention that Lindsey books has the plans to make one.

http://www.lindsaybks.com/HomePage.html

Jerry

ibewgypsie
04-25-2003, 04:19 AM
Mike. I got a old one, it weighs about 800lbs.. Personally I would trade it for a 200 dollar bandsaw. I just bid on some blades for it on ebay. I have a motor on it, a little too small. First motor I had on it ran 3600 rpm and it would jump off the floor.. it does cut straight tho.

Where are you at? we might work something out.

Mike Burdick
04-25-2003, 11:23 AM
I'm located in Utah. Right now I'm just looking into them.

Mike

Rotate
04-25-2003, 11:56 AM
Is there something that power hacksaw can do that bandsaw can't?

Albert

lynnl
04-25-2003, 12:05 PM
Good question Albert. I've always doubted it. Which is why I passed one up at auction, before buying a bandsaw. ...now glad I did.

But then whatda I know. I've never even seen one in use. I'll be watching for answers from the knowledgeable along with you.

Chester
04-25-2003, 12:19 PM
They can cut that 4" bar unattended while you are off hibernating for the winter. Before you invest any $$ in those, check out John Dean's METAL SLICER in Apr 95 issue of PIM. Compact, and looks like it will do a good job.

ibewgypsie
04-25-2003, 01:01 PM
Well, the old timer machinist (read that codger) at TVA told me.. if the blade is straight and the vise is tight it will cut perfectly straight. It makes a a stroke that is straight back and forth like a shaper, not a flimsy thin blade.
When I got mine, (peerless) it had the blade on backwards and I wonder how that worked out for them? Some people amaze me. It strokes like a hacksaw, downward pressure one way, lifts the other. (the way I was taught to file too)

They had some drill presses at TVA made like a milling machine for boring large holes. Adjustable rotation, adjustable drill angle indexing, adjustable feed down. You moved the head over the hole. I think they were made in the 20's or 30's. only used morse taper drills. I was awed, straight holes, I wanted one sooo bad.
They weighed more than 6,000 pounds tho, no way it would fit in my lunchbox. (actually I am troubled by the honesty syndrome)



[This message has been edited by ibewgypsie (edited 04-25-2003).]

G.A. Ewen
04-25-2003, 01:34 PM
My power hacksaw is an old Racine rail cutter. It will cut straighter than any bandsaw that I have ever used. Blade life is good if I use 14 tpi. (last week made 25 cuts on 1/12" x 4" flat bar, no teeth missing but getting a bit dull) I would like to have a bandsaw for some work but not at the expense of the Racine. I built the first power hacksaw that I ever owened, my frend Ducan ( a fellow HSM ) has it now. It works good but doesn't lift on the back stroke. Funny thing is that it's not any harder on blades than the Racine. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//confused.gif
Hope this helps you make a choice. Regards, George

[This message has been edited by G.A. Ewen (edited 04-25-2003).]

wierdscience
04-25-2003, 10:04 PM
Yes there is one thing special they can do, you can make a few slight mods and have a nifty paint shaker! http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

halfnut
04-26-2003, 03:35 AM
If you can find a good old used power hacksaw it should be cheap. I love mine, gave just a little over scrap price for it and delivered to boot.

Will slice off 4" bar stock to within .005, takes a good bandsaw to do the same. Blades are cheap and last a good long time. I use 4tpi blades, thin stuff gets cut with the chop saw.

Yes it's a bit slow, but it shuts off when it's done and I don't have to worry about it like a cheap bandsaw, which I sold as soon as I had the old hacksaw running.

Thrud
04-26-2003, 04:54 AM
ibewgypsie:
If you strip the set off of the blade it will cut crooked too.

Biggest advantage is they are solid machines and can be left unnattended so you can get other things done.

I prefer the cold cut saws. Since the first time I used one I have been sold on them. Abrasive saws can be handy, but they tend to harden stock at the cuts - still better than torching it off.

I wonder why no one has built a abrasive wet saw for ferrous metals?

BC21OSH
04-26-2003, 08:57 AM
Why hasn't anyone built a chop saw similar to a cutoff saw for wood? Use a variable speed motor and a good carbide blade. I believe I saw an article one time where a guy had used his wood saw for metal with a carbide blade. He must have been cutting non-ferrous material but if you built it right you could cut steel as well. You could build a power feed into it so you could leave it unattended. You might also want a coolant system for ferrous material.

Just a thought.

Bernard

lynnl
04-26-2003, 12:54 PM
I hope no one contemplating getting a power hacksaw construes my comment above ("...Which is why I passed one up at auction, before buying a bandsaw. ...now glad I did...") as a negative assessment.

I didn't intend it as such. Rather, just stating my pleasure with the bandsaw.

Forrest Addy
04-26-2003, 02:00 PM
There's a prejudice factor in selection of cut off saws. The movement and action of all those moving parts delights the child in every machinist. Lots of people prefer knee action power hacksaws even if they are a bit slow and more expensive to operate.

Peerless, Racine, Marvel are but a few great old names for power hacksaws. Find one in good shape and it's all over except for a good source of blades - which can be a hurdle.

On the other hand, unless badly mismatched even a cheap import band cut-off saw will cut faster than and as straight as a power hack saw and you get more cuts per dollar of blade and a smoother cut.

I took a company gear blank job home to my lathe because of a breakdown. The owner had a powerful prejudice favoring his 10" Marvel power hacksaw which did all the shop cutting. This saw took 22 minutes on a fresh blade to cut a 6" piece of 4140 I was to use for blanks.

When I got to my shop, I had to cut the stock in 2 pieces on my cheap Enco band cut-off saw. The cut took 9 minutes and I didn't have to watch it. Just for funzies I sawed a 1/16" slice to show the boss. It was parallel within a couple of thou.

When the boss was lucky he could find good bi-metal saw blades for $13 each but they're getting scarce. The Simonds 3/4" x 85" Super bi-metal saw bands I use cost $22 in lots of 5 or more and I can get them instantly from any major saw shop. I think I get about three times the life if you'll accept an impression in lieu of a side by side comparison.

If you stumble across a good power hacksaw and can find a reliable source of blades go for it if that's your preference.

Remember, though, that you never see a power hacksaw in a competitive shop unless the boss is an old fart stuck in his ways. Production power hacksaws are no longer made. They've been entirely replaced with band cut-off saws.

My Enco Turn-Pro Horizontal/vertical 7 x 12 is a cheap import but it delivers good straight cuts reliably. You can flip the saw frame up and install a table on the lower guide for use as a power bandsaw. I made a padded seat that fits the vise for comfort. You can buy it on sale for $699 or less plus freight.

The smaller 5" x 6" saws are much lower in cost ($179) but they will saw 4" material. Being quite light they are readily portable. If you elect to go with the 4 x 7 or 5 x 6 size saw, watch yourself. The Jet is over priced and some of the imports can be very cheesy.

[This message has been edited by Forrest Addy (edited 04-26-2003).]

ibewgypsie
04-26-2003, 04:26 PM
Don't know actually what you are hunting, but.. I saw a chop saw kit that was put on a Milwaukee port-a-band that would cut 4 inches with ease.

Don't know where it came from, but for a real small shop a port-a-band saw is hard to beat. Mine is a deep cut, cost about 279 at www.grainger.com (http://www.grainger.com) (was on sale) be sure to get a name brand saw. Look there and HF for the chop saw set up too..

I could not do without my saw. It is one of the most used items in my shop. I even made a stand to free cut sheet metal like a large verticle bandsaw. (don't know where it is right now tho) I regularly cut driveshafts with mine, you roll around and around the same cut you layout with a pipe wrap until the plug comes out with the universal.

motorworks
04-26-2003, 06:30 PM
I have both hyrdo hacksaw (old elliot 6") and a band saw.The old hacksaw cuts away when I am working on something else.Rises back up and stops when the cut is done.It does not make a mess in the shop like the abrasive disc typs do and a lot less noise.
Picked in up for $70.00 about 10 years ago.
The band is quicker,but there is something nice about watching that old hyrdo hacksaw cut!!

G.A. Ewen
04-26-2003, 08:23 PM
K.B.C. Tools sell power hacksaw blades. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//wink.gif

ibewgypsie
04-27-2003, 10:50 PM
Just got (9) hacksaw blades off'n ebay for 9 dollars + shipping. Trying to figure out how to power a shaper with the hack-stroker I have. I have drawed pictures of mounting one of the home-maded benchtops on it on both ends now. Shame to have such a large footprint in My tiny shop do just one thing.

Any ideals?

docsteve66
04-28-2003, 10:14 AM
ibewgypsie: I remember no details, but I did see a shaper with a hack saw clamped to it. I just remember, saying "thats a neat simple idea". Way I remember, it was just basicaly a hack saw clamped to the clapper. It was slow, (becasue the shaper strokes were slow), but it did stop when the cut was finished. Sorry I don't remember more, but it should be a fairly simple set up. I do remember it went on and off the shaper with litle time expended.
Steve

Paul Gauthier
04-28-2003, 12:13 PM
We have two Racines at work very old very heavy must weigh 4000 lbs. each. Use a 24 inch blade and able to cut 12 to 14 inches wide maybe more. Both are very quiet when running.

------------------
Paul G.

YoheShop
04-28-2003, 02:06 PM
Have used two Keller power hacksaws. As far as I know they are still made in Wisconsin. Both worked best using 1140 rpm motors. After it all, I still decided to remain with a bandsaw - much faster and, if setup right, just as accurate. If anyone is interested, there is a beautiful rebuilt Keller at Joe Bergamo's Plaza Machinery in Bethel, VT(at least as of last week) He advertises in HSM.

Herb

Pete H
12-03-2009, 04:09 PM
I just got an old Jefferson 601, and found out that they're still made, and they look nearly identical to my (pre-Zipcode) model.

Keller Saws, in Alabama: http://www.kellersaws.com/601bench.html

Usual disclaimer - I have no connection, either personal or financial, with this company.

-Pete H

Optics Curmudgeon
12-03-2009, 04:27 PM
I've got a home made one that I bought through the local paper years ago, it cuts mild steel at a rate of 10 minutes per square inch. I replaced it with a 4X6 bandsaw and it's available free for the taking if anyone's interested. BTW, one article on converting a shaper to a power hacksaw can be found here: http://www.nevilshute.org/Engineering/ModelEngineer/convertingshaper1.php

Joe

The Artful Bodger
12-03-2009, 08:09 PM
I've got a home made one that I bought through the local paper years ago, it cuts mild steel at a rate of 10 minutes per square inch. I replaced it with a 4X6 bandsaw and it's available free for the taking if anyone's interested. BTW, one article on converting a shaper to a power hacksaw can be found here: http://www.nevilshute.org/Engineering/ModelEngineer/convertingshaper1.php

Joe

Joe, I have a little Adept shaper the same as was used by Nevil Shute so perhaps I should make a hacksaw attachment in memory of a great engineer and story teller!

Ghop Shop
12-03-2009, 09:05 PM
I have a power hacksaw in my shop and have found it useful for cutting tough metals such as RR irons and grader blades.

Gayle Hopson

bruto
12-03-2009, 09:15 PM
Why hasn't anyone built a chop saw similar to a cutoff saw for wood? Use a variable speed motor and a good carbide blade. I believe I saw an article one time where a guy had used his wood saw for metal with a carbide blade. He must have been cutting non-ferrous material but if you built it right you could cut steel as well. You could build a power feed into it so you could leave it unattended. You might also want a coolant system for ferrous material.

Just a thought.

BernardI've wondered the same thing and even thought about how one might modify one. You can use a regular chop saw with a carbide blade for aluminum as it stands. I do that often for alu. picture frames. Use the most teeth you can afford, and keep the tooth rake shallow or even negative. VERY loud, and chips are nasty, so ear and eye protection!

A possible candidate for conversion might be the older Delta non-compound miter saws, which use a cogged belt. The belt gears the blade speed up, but it might be possible to reverse or change the pulleys and gear it down instead.

Too_Many_Tools
12-03-2009, 11:48 PM
There's a prejudice factor in selection of cut off saws. The movement and action of all those moving parts delights the child in every machinist. Lots of people prefer knee action power hacksaws even if they are a bit slow and more expensive to operate.

Peerless, Racine, Marvel are but a few great old names for power hacksaws. Find one in good shape and it's all over except for a good source of blades - which can be a hurdle.

On the other hand, unless badly mismatched even a cheap import band cut-off saw will cut faster than and as straight as a power hack saw and you get more cuts per dollar of blade and a smoother cut.

I took a company gear blank job home to my lathe because of a breakdown. The owner had a powerful prejudice favoring his 10" Marvel power hacksaw which did all the shop cutting. This saw took 22 minutes on a fresh blade to cut a 6" piece of 4140 I was to use for blanks.

When I got to my shop, I had to cut the stock in 2 pieces on my cheap Enco band cut-off saw. The cut took 9 minutes and I didn't have to watch it. Just for funzies I sawed a 1/16" slice to show the boss. It was parallel within a couple of thou.

When the boss was lucky he could find good bi-metal saw blades for $13 each but they're getting scarce. The Simonds 3/4" x 85" Super bi-metal saw bands I use cost $22 in lots of 5 or more and I can get them instantly from any major saw shop. I think I get about three times the life if you'll accept an impression in lieu of a side by side comparison.

If you stumble across a good power hacksaw and can find a reliable source of blades go for it if that's your preference.

Remember, though, that you never see a power hacksaw in a competitive shop unless the boss is an old fart stuck in his ways. Production power hacksaws are no longer made. They've been entirely replaced with band cut-off saws.

My Enco Turn-Pro Horizontal/vertical 7 x 12 is a cheap import but it delivers good straight cuts reliably. You can flip the saw frame up and install a table on the lower guide for use as a power bandsaw. I made a padded seat that fits the vise for comfort. You can buy it on sale for $699 or less plus freight.

The smaller 5" x 6" saws are much lower in cost ($179) but they will saw 4" material. Being quite light they are readily portable. If you elect to go with the 4 x 7 or 5 x 6 size saw, watch yourself. The Jet is over priced and some of the imports can be very cheesy.

[This message has been edited by Forrest Addy (edited 04-26-2003).]


Got a picture of that padded seat that fits the vise?

And one of you sitting on it? ;<)

TMT

rowbare
12-04-2009, 10:34 AM
I've wondered the same thing and even thought about how one might modify one. You can use a regular chop saw with a carbide blade for aluminum as it stands. I do that often for alu. picture frames. Use the most teeth you can afford, and keep the tooth rake shallow or even negative. VERY loud, and chips are nasty, so ear and eye protection!

A possible candidate for conversion might be the older Delta non-compound miter saws, which use a cogged belt. The belt gears the blade speed up, but it might be possible to reverse or change the pulleys and gear it down instead.
Bruto, The original message you replied to was 6 years old. I think the currently available dry cut saws fit the bill. An example is: http://www.milwaukeetool.com:80/ProductDetail.aspx?ProductId=6190-20&CategoryName=SC%3a+Chop+Saws

Orrin
12-04-2009, 10:29 PM
I have both, a reciprocating hack-saw and a band saw. For sure, it takes extra fuss and care to hold undersized and odd shaped pieces in the recip saw.

Keep in mind that a band saw maintains a fairly steady force on the work-piece in only one direction. Compare that to the wiggling two-direction forces work the piece out of the vise of a reciprocating saw.

I like both, but the band saw gets the nod for unusual cuts. It's more versatile, too, operating in both the horizontal and the vertical modes. I've been known to cut sheet metal in the band saw, but I'd never dare try it in the recip unit.

If I had to settle for only one, the recip would have to go, even though it is a good, solid piece of made-in-USA iron and the band saw is a cheap flimsy import.

Orrin

seattle smitty
07-29-2010, 03:15 PM
Why hasn't anyone built a chop saw similar to a cutoff saw for wood? Use a variable speed motor and a good carbide blade. I believe I saw an article one time where a guy had used his wood saw for metal with a carbide blade. He must have been cutting non-ferrous material but if you built it right you could cut steel as well. You could build a power feed into it so you could leave it unattended. You might also want a coolant system for ferrous material.

Just a thought.

Bernard


Doing a search and found this old thread. Bernard, the type of saw you want (I think) is called a "cold saw"; Google that.

I recently acquired an old (early Fifties?) Sears Dunlop 12" power hacksaw. Paid $16 estimated scrap value for the saw, motor, and a crappy homemade stand. I cleaned up and lubed the saw, rebuilt the stand, and rewired using a new switch for the automatic shut-off. Tried cutting with the old dull blade but it was very slow, and I can see I need to adjust and probably re-bush the system that raises the blade on the backstroke.

What I'd like to know is if anyone here has the original manual and parts blow-up that Sears included with all its power tools (I'd like to copy it). What I like about this saw is its compactness. I can carry it on my service truck and use it for some cuts instead of the chop-saw or torch, or at least I'll try it for a while.