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Evan
06-24-2007, 10:49 PM
I stumbled on this online this evening. It is a huge repository of examples of many types of mechanical mechanisms. It includes full content online books on the subject as well.

http://vts.bc.ca/pics2/kmoddl.gif


KMODDL is a collection of mechanical models and related resources for teaching the principles of kinematics--the geometry of pure motion. The core of KMODDL is the Reuleaux Collection of Mechanisms and Machines, an important collection of 19th-century machine elements held by Cornell's Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.

http://kmoddl.library.cornell.edu/index.php

aostling
06-24-2007, 11:05 PM
I stumbled on this online this evening. It is a huge repository of examples of many types of mechanical mechanisms. It includes full content online books on the subject as well.


Evan,

This fascinating. I'll not bypass Cornell, next time I'm in New York.

grannygear
06-24-2007, 11:28 PM
Evan,

Wonderful. Just the thing I've been looking for. Now I can really waste my time when I should be working. Sigh...

TGTool
06-25-2007, 12:36 AM
Whew. Now after wasting another perfectly good hour looking at only a small sample of the mechanisms, where was I when I innocently clicked that link?

PTSideshow
06-25-2007, 09:02 AM
If you go to category #9 your in the steam power movement not large but neat just the same.steampower models (http://kmoddl.library.cornell.edu/model.php?cat=9)
:D

BigBoy1
06-25-2007, 10:17 AM
Being old fashioned, I have a set of books with mechanisms. The four volume set is called "Ingenious Mechanism", edited by Franklin Jones. It is a reprint of a 1930's set of books. Each volume of the set haves over 500 pages so you will find what you are looking for.

Bill

lazlo
06-25-2007, 11:17 AM
"Mechanisms and Mechanical Devices Sourcebook" by Neil Sclater is another (more modern) encyclopedia of clever mechanisms.

http://www.vonl.com/chips/mechmech.htm

http://www.vonl.com/chips/mechmech.jpg

dicks42000
06-25-2007, 12:02 PM
OK, Earlier I was making the point that information on mechanisms was hard to find on-line in Lane's discussion about drawings & plans. I have the "Sourcebook" and others in my library but the Cornell site is wild.
Thanks again;
Rick

BadDog
06-25-2007, 01:46 PM
I've also got the "Ingenious Mechanisms" set. WOW! Talk about overwhelming. Most of those are terribly complex mechanisms that were used for automated systems in the pre-CNC days in bottling plants and what not. Way more complicated than most of the stuff HSMs would want or need. A book with more basic mechanisms like those on the site Evan posted, would be more useful.

Peter N
06-25-2007, 03:25 PM
I've also got the "Ingenious Mechanisms" set. WOW! Talk about overwhelming. Most of those are terribly complex mechanisms that were used for automated systems in the pre-CNC days in bottling plants and what not. Way more complicated than most of the stuff HSMs would want or need. A book with more basic mechanisms like those on the site Evan posted, would be more useful.

I agree, the 'ingenious mechanisms' book has some amazing and very clever stuff in there, but not hugely useful as a reference unless you have an awful lot of time to trawl through it.

BadDog, I posted this link (no pun intended..) on the shantytown washer thread, you may not have seen it there:
http://www.flying-pig.co.uk/mechanisms/index.html

It's a simple set of animations explaining nearly all the most popular mechanisms.

Peter

BadDog
06-25-2007, 03:29 PM
Actually, I did see it and enjoyed it a great deal. Very well presented examples of simple mechanisms. Thank you for the "link". ;)

Peter S
06-25-2007, 10:00 PM
For those who prefer their mechanisms in print:

Another set of books is "Mechanisms in Modern Engineering Design" by I.I. Artobolevsky, published in Moscow in 1975. There are seven books in this set. There are hundreds (thousands?) of diagrams each with explanatory text.

Another one I was told about (but haven't seen) is: "Mechanisms and Mechanical Devices Sourcebook" by N. P. Chirons. Possibly already mentioned, but different author or editor.

I think the same author also has "Mechanisms, Linkages and Mechanical Controls".

aostling
06-25-2007, 11:04 PM
For those who prefer their mechanisms in print:

Another set of books is "Mechanisms in Modern Engineering Design" by I.I. Artobolevsky, published in Moscow in 1975. There are seven books in this set. There are hundreds (thousands?) of diagrams each with explanatory text.

Another one I was told about (but haven't seen) is: "Mechanisms and Mechanical Devices Sourcebook" by N. P. Chirons. Possibly already mentioned, but different author or editor.

I think the same author also has "Mechanisms, Linkages and Mechanical Controls".

I have the two original Nicholas Chironis books (Machine Devices and Instrumention 1966, and Mechanisms, Linkages, and Mechanical Controls 1965), and I can't praise them enough. Most of the descriptions are reprints from articles regularly published in the periodical Product Engineering during the 1960s. As you say, there is the new compendium http://www.amazon.com/Mechanisms-Mechanical-Devices-Sourcebook-Fourth/dp/0071467610/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/103-0981620-0830246?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1182823053&sr=8-1 which reprints much of the original material. There is extensive coverage of Geneva mechanisms, just one example of hundreds of intriguing devices.

I have perused the Artobolevsky set. I can't say anything bad about it, but I was never inspired to purchase it. I should revisit it, and refresh my memory.

John Stevenson
06-26-2007, 04:27 AM
For those who prefer their mechanisms in print:

Another set of books is "Mechanisms in Modern Engineering Design" by I.I. Artobolevsky, published in Moscow in 1975. There are seven books in this set. There are hundreds (thousands?) of diagrams each with explanatory text.



Although there are seven books as Peter says they are split into 5 volumes.
Volume 2 and 5 are in two parts which makes it confusing when trying to buy a copy.
Some are easy to get but I am missing one volume, either 3 or 4 [ one is not on the shelf at the moment ] but have been searching ages to get the last one.

The best part about these books is the layout. The drawings and text stay together as a sub chapter.

In the Ingenious mechanisms books you might have to keep going back or forwards to match the text and description with the drawings.
When they run onto split pages it can get confusing.

.

Peter S
06-26-2007, 04:41 AM
Although there are seven books as Peter says they are split into 5 volumes.
Volume 2 and 5 are in two parts which makes it confusing when trying to buy a copy.
Some are easy to get but I am missing one volume, either 3 or 4 [ one is not on the shelf at the moment ] but have been searching ages to get the last one.
.


I am missing a couple of the books too, despite buying them new when they came out. Possibly a subtle commie plot to confuse engineering in the West? It worked on me anyway.

lazlo
06-26-2007, 12:02 PM
Another one I was told about (but haven't seen) is: "Mechanisms and Mechanical Devices Sourcebook" by N. P. Chirons. Possibly already mentioned, but different author or editor..

That's the book I posted on the first page. Neil Sclater is the first author, Nicholas Chironis is the second author.

http://www.amazon.com/Mechanisms-Mechanical-Devices-Sourcebook-Fourth/dp/0071467610/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/103-0981620-0830246?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1182823053&sr=8-1

Great book!