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View Full Version : Transformer to run a Hardinge 440VAC, 3PH lathe?



berol
06-29-2007, 07:58 AM
I have a Hardinge lathe that has a main drive Genereral Electric induction motor 440VAC, 3PH, 1HP & two smaller 440VAC, 3PH motors 1/10 HP & 1/20 HP for fluid pump etc. I have 208/120 3PH and would like some suggestions on equipment that would increase the voltage with the least loss of torque etc to run this lathe. Also is the 3PH required for these lathe motors and that provided by 208/120 the same; so all I need to do is increase the voltage? Also could you suggest the best places to purchase such equipment. Thanks! Berol

wierdscience
06-29-2007, 08:41 AM
Is this a second op lathe?

In any rate a 3~ stepup transformer will do the job.That's what we run our Hardinge second op lathe off of at work.If it's a toolroom Hardinge then you may be able to use a VFD.It's possible you might find what you need on Fleabay,but if not here is one outfit I have used in the past-

http://www.electricalpowertransformer.com/step-up.html

wmgeorge
06-29-2007, 12:42 PM
Most (if not all) 3 phase stuff I've worked on is dual voltage 460/230 3 Ph, just get a qualified electrician who knows industrial and re-connect the motors. You will need to replace the motor starter thermal overload heater elements for the proper amp draw. The control transformers will need the primary taps changed also for 230 volts. Smaller single phase 460 volt motors you can either put on a transformer or just change out the motor to the correct voltage.





I have a Hardinge lathe that has a main drive Genereral Electric induction motor 440VAC, 3PH, 1HP & two smaller 440VAC, 3PH motors 1/10 HP & 1/20 HP for fluid pump etc. I have 208/120 3PH and would like some suggestions on equipment that would increase the voltage with the least loss of torque etc to run this lathe. Also is the 3PH required for these lathe motors and that provided by 208/120 the same; so all I need to do is increase the voltage? Also could you suggest the best places to purchase such equipment. Thanks! Berol

hitnmiss
06-29-2007, 12:45 PM
My Feeler copy is 440, ran off a 220--->110 step down transformer wired in reverse.

I'm away from home but the xformer isn't physically very big, maybe 10x10x18 inches but heavy... Maybe 70lbs?
Has worked great for over a year now.

I was surprised the lathe motor was 1 horse. It's gotta be the biggest 1 horse motor made!

As far as dual voltage, I believe they are but High and Low range already uses that fact. At least that's my (limited) understanding...

wmgeorge
06-29-2007, 01:15 PM
If you have a 2 speed motor, it would not use the dual voltage windings to do so. It would need both a hi and lo speed winding. Motor speed depends on the number of poles (windings) and the frequency of the AC voltage source. I can't comment if your 2 speed , 3 phase motor has dual voltage wiring or not, I'd need to see the motor. But that is why your motor is so big!

Sure transformers are just a ratio thing and as long as wire inside is rated for your voltage and of course sized for the amps, you can do about anything with one. If you are going the transformer route make sure it will handle all the motor loads, and the starting amps. New 3 phase ones are expensive, used ones?? BG



My Feeler copy is 440, ran off a 220--->110 step down transformer wired in reverse.

I'm away from home but the xformer isn't physically very big, maybe 10x10x18 inches but heavy... Maybe 70lbs?
Has worked great for over a year now.

I was surprised the lathe motor was 1 horse. It's gotta be the biggest 1 horse motor made!

As far as dual voltage, I believe they are but High and Low range already uses that fact. At least that's my (limited) understanding...

recoilless
06-29-2007, 01:23 PM
I believe Hardinge produced some machines equipped with 440v only motors. I recently sold a Hardinge TM mill that was tagged 440 v, not dual voltage. I think it was a consequent pole motor. Anyway, another source for transformers is Sola Hevy Duty. I dealt w/ them thru MSC. They were quite helpful. Wiring up the t-formers is a breeze...just follow instructions

drof34
06-29-2007, 05:56 PM
If it's like my sec-op 5-9er with a dovetail bed, then it's a two speed 440V only. This motor has two sets of windings.

The outside of the cabinet says one horsepower but the nametag on the motor says GE 3/4-3/8 HP. Sounds like something that belongs on a 4" Taig to me.

You have two problems that you need to overcome, first is stepping the voltage up to 440V and the second is to get 3 phase out of single phase.

I haven't tryed this but I believe you could use a single phase transformer to step the voltage up and feed this into a 3 phase 440V idler motor with the proper capacitors to form an RPC that would do what you want. That way no internal changes are required.

Jim W.

wierdscience
06-29-2007, 08:20 PM
Most of the Hardinge motors I have seen are single voltage two speed 440vac.It's nice to keep the facotry setup if possible.It allows you to shift from low to high speed and fwd/rev on the fly,really nice for drilling and tapping large numbers of holes.

DR
06-30-2007, 04:17 PM
A transformer is needed in this case.

Three phase transformers can be a bit on the pricely side (unless your'e lucky enough to stumble onto a good deal).

All my Hardinge 440V machines are run off a phase converter, nominally 220V ouput. The phase converter output goes into a pair of single phase 220 to 440 transformers wired in an open delta configuration.

Single phase transformers are generally available surplus at very reasonable prices. I think the pair on my DSM-59 was around $75.

Search the web for the connection diagram for open delta or look in a transformer catalog, it's commonly used.