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lane
07-06-2007, 09:28 PM
This is my Friday evening project. A bracket to mount my hoist to my mill. Made from crs plate with a 1 dia. pin 9 inches long bolted to it with a 5/8 -18 bolt 2 long . had to remake the two long hold down studs for the mill .Made from 7/8 dia. ETD 150
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w277/lane5263/Hoistformill003.jpg
This is my hoist I built from 1 5/8 dom tubing with a harbor freight boat wench .Tube is 1 id and slips over long pin bolted to bracket.
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w277/lane5263/Hoistformill004.jpg
Hoist shone lifting super spacer off table. will also lift kurt vice and rotary table .
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w277/lane5263/Hoistformill001.jpg
Hoist is then swiveled to unload tooling.
http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w277/lane5263/Hoistformill002.jpg
As I get older this stuff gets heaver. Use to could lift on and of table all day but not any more.My hoist is kind of copied from a sky hook we had at work.

Nutter
07-06-2007, 10:01 PM
That's a good plan.

I'm moving to a new shop in a couple weeks. I want to set it up with an overhead hoist that ran above both the mill and lathe for heavy tooling, but individual hoists like that may make more sense.

lane
07-06-2007, 10:10 PM
I can slip the hoist off the pin and drop it on a pin mounted to a block on my Quick change toolpost on the lathe for removing heavy chucks. One hoist two jobs,

oldtiffie
07-07-2007, 02:11 AM
Deleted/erased-out

Forrest Addy
07-07-2007, 04:45 AM
Nice peice of work - but (there's always a "but") I'm a little nervous about the overhang of the load from those two attachment bolts. Suspended loads off to the side exerts a powerful leverage on that plate where the bolts hold it down to the turret top. The hoist as it is, is robably not a problem when lifting a 5" vise or a small rotary table. But move up to a 6" vise or a 15" rotary table (hey, good deals happen) and the strength of the two bolts may be severely tested.

I'd be more confortable if there was a stout strut or gusset connecting the outboard corner of the plate to the turret near its bottom.

John Stevenson
07-07-2007, 05:14 AM
I used the pin at the back that normally holds the slotting head.

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/stevenson.engineers/lsteve/hidden/Bridgycrane.jpg

So far 3 machines have the swivel boom arrangement and the hoist end can be swapped between them in seconds.
One machine has bearings fitted but it was a mistake as it's too free and wants to swing.
This one is on a big nylon bush that stays where it's placed but still not too hard to swing.
That rotor weighs about 250# it can can lift more.

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/stevenson.engineers/lsteve/files/vibro1.jpg

The 'crane' is a winch off a trailer fitted with a strap instead of a wire rope as they don't kink. Going up is OK as it's on the ratchet but you have to look what you are doing going down as it can run away if you let it.
I have had no problems.
The one on the CNC has since been fitted with a powered winch as this one get used the most.

.

IOWOLF
07-07-2007, 02:29 PM
And Me with a darnd old Wells Index, I cant do either easily.

But it is worth looking into. I am not getting any younger.

Nutter
07-07-2007, 05:59 PM
My Gorton Mastermil doesn't have either option readily available either, but I'm not opposed to drilling and tapping the column itself :)

I like the idea of a second mount on QCTP. I've got an old lathe with a CA series QCTP. Seems like that should be stout enough to handle a 12" chuck.

I'll have to look for a strap type winch the next time at Northern Tool.

J. R. Williams
07-07-2007, 07:02 PM
Check out the (Home metal shop club) web page newsletter of August 2004 for a short article I wrote showing a jib Crane I fabricated for my mill. I used a small chain hoist and the unit has a traveling ball bearing trolley. It sure saves the old back.

JRW

lane
07-07-2007, 11:10 PM
Sir John I like yours . I Thought about something like that . Had I seen the picture that is the way I would have gone . But mine works and the bolts I made wont break. And the plate wont bend .

BadDog
07-07-2007, 11:51 PM
Darn, as of tonight, I don't have that option any more either...


I just hung an E-Head back there... :D

oldtiffie
07-08-2007, 04:51 AM
Deleted/erased-out

Evan
07-08-2007, 05:15 AM
But mine works and the bolts I made wont break. And the plate wont bend .

Heh, I recognize that certainty. It's from years of experience but also an almost instinctive "feeling" for what the metal will do. It's not that it "looks strong enough" but an intuitive understanding of where the limit lies. It can't really be explained or taught but it is learned.

A.K. Boomer
07-08-2007, 09:33 AM
Damn --- I coulda used one of those apparatusses to install my mills table, seriously, my table was about all I could handle, although just an 8 by 36 it was still a little "boat anchor", and then there was trying to keep it aligned while doing it, not fun but no one else around at three in the morning, biggest fear was getting it a couple inches on and then having a hand slip destroying everything, I cant believe what some of you catz are setting on your mills -- i would definity want some kind of hoist also:eek:

Frank Ford
07-08-2007, 11:09 AM
A couple of years ago I made myself a little chain hoist trolly, using regular galvanized pipe for tracks - it's a real back saver and it covers the area over and between my lathe and mill:

http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Machining/Projects/MiniHoist/minihoist20.jpg

Here's the full story, if you're interested:

Miniature Chain Hoist (http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Machining/Projects/MiniHoist/minihoist.html)



Cheers,

Frank Ford
FRETS.COM (http://www.frets.com)
Gryphon Stringed Instruments (http://www.gryphonstrings.com)
My Home Shop Pages (http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Machining/index.html)

A.K. Boomer
07-08-2007, 11:16 AM
King of the improvisers!,,, nice little pulley too:)

lane
07-10-2007, 08:33 PM
Frank I would be worried about those # 10 wood screws you got going in to the rafters . Yes i know their are 16 , 4 on each end . And you know to not lift more than 100 Lb.

japcas
07-10-2007, 09:46 PM
Lane, that looks like a 6 inch indexer made by Vertex in the picture that is hooked to your crane. I have been looking at that one also. How do you like it? I have the 8 inch vertex rotary table and like it a lot and figured if the indexer was as nice as it is I'd be real happy with one.

Your Old Dog
07-10-2007, 10:00 PM
Frank, pretty sweet low tech setup you got there!

Lane, if you were ever worried about your setup you could easily add a 2 or 3 inch strut from under the riser and back to the shoulder on the mill and alleviate a lot of stresses off the bolts, or, at least configure the stresses so that they wouldn't be the concern they appear to be now. On the other hand, if it's not abused it could last as you have it longer than any of us :D

lane
07-10-2007, 10:19 PM
Yes that is a 6 inch vertex and very nice. I like it better than the Phase II in the indexer. AND LIKE SAID THE PLATE WONT BEND AND THE BOLTS WONT BRAKE. How do I know I built it.

IOWOLF
07-11-2007, 07:49 AM
You tell 'em lane.:)
Every one is worried about what looks unsafe when we post photos,They should wander through there shop and see what is unsafe.

But it really is a nice setup there lane, it to is on my list, which is long enough it goes around my shop twice now. :)

Evan
07-11-2007, 09:47 AM
I have an overhead chainfall but have been thinking of adding either a trolly system or a central pivot skyhook. Since I have a 10.5' ceiling I have some room to do it. I don't have a need for moving chucks and similar but do deal with other heavy materials and parts. I also can't lift heavy weights well because of my FMS and depend a lot on power assistance anywhere I can arrange it. I'm not too bad yet but am looking toward the future and want to get things set up while I still can so that I will be able to continue doing what I want for a while yet.

Lane's hoist gives me some ideas for individual lifting arrangements such as one for the welding bench and one for the shaper. I don't like the idea of an engine hoist as it takes too much space.

HTRN
07-11-2007, 07:51 PM
Evan, Northern Tool used to sell a light duty bridge crane for use in the garage - while they no longer carry it, I'm sure it can be duplicated - Mcmaster Carr sells 400lb rated and 600lb rated box track, and they can be doubled up at each end(the latter would require making brackets). Combine that with an I beam for a bridge, and a half ton bridge crane is not unfeasable.


HTRN

Evan
07-11-2007, 08:07 PM
I had considered a bridge crane but my ceiling isn't really high enough as it would have to clear the lights and that would drop it rather low. A trolly track can be routed around the garage in a circle and miss the lights. I already have the trolly so just need the track. I also have a small 1 ton electric winch that could be mounted on it.

Trolly:

http://vts.bc.ca/pics/trav2.jpg

lazlo
07-11-2007, 11:40 PM
But mine works and the bolts I made wont break. And the plate wont bend.Heh, I recognize that certainty. It's from years of experience but also an almost instinctive "feeling" for what the metal will do. It's not that it "looks strong enough" but an intuitive understanding of where the limit lies. It can't really be explained or taught but it is learned.

Well, it's from years of Lane being a professional machinist, but it's also because he used 7/8" ETD 150 studs. A.K.A. LaSalle's 4140 Pre Hard, which has a tensile strength of 150,000 PSI. In other words, ETD 150 is almost 3 times as strong as AISI 1020 mild steel.

You'll pull the Bridgeport over on it's nose with that winch before those studs will start to bend...

Nice job, as always Lane.

Evan
07-12-2007, 12:58 AM
Well, it's from years of Lane being a professional machinist, but it's also because he used 7/8" ETD 150 studs. A.K.A. LaSalle's 4140 Pre Hard, which has a tensile strength of 150,000 PSI. In other words, ETD 150 is almost 3 times as strong as AISI 1020 mild steel.

Sure, my point exactly. I'm sure he didn't do an engineering analysis either. No need. After enough experience bending paper clips you get so you know when the next bend will make it break. You can't teach somebody that, they have to learn for themselves.

lane
07-12-2007, 07:14 PM
And the plate is cold finished T1 plate hard as the hinges of hell .

IOWOLF
07-12-2007, 07:51 PM
I figured it is not so hard to put a plate on the Wells. Photos soon.

pcarpenter
07-13-2007, 12:01 PM
"And the plate is cold finished T1 plate hard as the hinges of hell ."

"but it's also because he used 7/8" ETD 150 studs. A.K.A. LaSalle's 4140 Pre Hard, which has a tensile strength of 150,000 PSI. In other words, ETD 150 is almost 3 times as strong as AISI 1020 mild steel."

EDT 150 studs....$4 each

T1 steel plate $10

Threading the studs into a flimsy turret cross yoke in a bridgeport mill made from cast iron which breaks and causes a valuable indexer to smash on the floor....
Priceless.:rolleyes: It ain't the threads on the studs that will fail.... That's a really big lever prying on those high quality studs threaded into Chinese cast iron. Be careful how much you decide to lift with that.

Paul

IOWOLF
07-13-2007, 02:58 PM
Now that's something I will not have to worry about on the Wells.
Nothing is flimsy on that beast.

lane
07-13-2007, 08:18 PM
OK OK to make every one happy. It is only designed to lift a Kurt visa and swivel base , A 6 inch Vertex indexer are a 10 inch Daper rotary table . I can pick them each up . But I`m getting older and they are getting heaver y. Yesterday i had to pick up a 18 inch troyke rotary table and put on mill all 200 lb of it. I aint doing that a home . Reason no Workmen's Comp.If i was the worry kind I would be worried about My welding on the hoist.A welder I aint.