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darryl
07-09-2007, 03:48 AM
I'm thinking again about building a bandsaw using the basement floor and upper floor joists to hold the lower and upper wheel assemblies, respectively. The blade might be about 20 ft long to make it around the four wheels. I have a short interior wall that would lend itself well to hosting the other two wheel assemblies and keeping things aligned. I'm aiming for a depth of throat of about 3 ft or so, and the only real problem I have is deciding if the ceiling joists can take the downward force from the blade tension. Other than that, I'd be needing a source for blade stock, probably a 50 or 100 ft roll. Not a carbon blade either, bi-metal or hss would be my choice. Can I get that, and roughly what would I have to pay for it?

All comments welcome. Maybe it's even stupid to consider making such a thing. I figure it would make blade changes much less frequent for a couple reasons, and it would let me saw sheet goods which I currently have to jig saw.

Evan
07-09-2007, 05:06 AM
Other than that, I'd be needing a source for blade stock, probably a 50 or 100 ft roll. Not a carbon blade either, bi-metal or hss would be my choice. Can I get that, and roughly what would I have to pay for it?

Thomas Skinner is just down the road in Richmond. I have bought from them and they have good pricing. They sell Lenox Bimetal in all types. It depends on what size of blade you plan to use. Classic Bimetal in 3/4" is $2.70 per foot, 1 inch is $3.19 and they go up to 2 inch.

See here:

http://www.tskinner.com/home_page/home_page1.htm

Your Old Dog
07-09-2007, 09:10 AM
Darryl,

When you say "blade stock" that sounds a bit different then a "blade" to me. If you plan on brazing/welding these up yourself let me suggest you try buying a foot or so first and actually making the weld.

I have a variable pitch sterrett blade that I can't get to stay together. I've MIGed it, brazed it and silver brazed it. Tried every kind of scarf joint I can think of to no avail. I even tried tempering the joint after silver brazing and it still keeps breaking after about 10 revolutions.

Just trying to help you avoid heartache and wasted money !! I bought 3 brand new 12 foot sterrett blades at a yard sale for $5.00. I have successfully brazed blades before but not this mystery high tech metal. It doesn't break a the joint but right next to it. When you look at it under glass it looks crystallized.

BTW, I don't think you'll be able to get enough tension on your plan to be able to make straight cuts. The only way I can get a straight cut on my horizontal or my vertical bandsaws are to pretty much reef down on the tension.

Evan
07-09-2007, 10:21 AM
When you look at it under glass it looks crystallized.
It is. Try annealing the material. The M42 alloy used on the cutting edge is subject to over hardening in the HAZ next to the weld. Heat the general area of the weld to red hot with a torch and then slowly back off the heat a little at a time until it no longer glows. Keep waving the torch on it after that for a few minutes to prevent any rapid cooling.

I forgot to mention that you should then break in the blade gently. Cut some aluminum for a few minutes and then some mild steel at much less than normal feed rate and fpm. This will cause the annealed teeth to work harden instead of stripping off.

J. R. Williams
07-09-2007, 11:28 AM
Old Dog
I silver solder my band saw blades and use mainly the bi-metal blades with a lap joint. I have had better results using a propane torch over the oxy-acety unit. I go thru two or three annealing passes after the joint is soldered. I use the 45% or 55% silver. The finished joint is ground smooth using a Dremel grinder with a small cylindrical abrasive drum.
JRW