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Lee in Texas
07-09-2007, 04:26 PM
I'm trying to remember the method using graph paper to make a "tape" around the edge of a plate blank. I just can't remember how he did it. I have the book, but it's 200 miles away. I want to make a tape with 7 divisions and attach it to my Sherline rotary table. I'll just lock it at each mark to help with a model radial engine. (non-functional).

topct
07-09-2007, 04:45 PM
Wrap a piece of masking tape around the outside of the table.

Slice through where the ends overlap.

Peel it off and measure how long it is.

Divide that length by 7, and with a caliper you could mark the tape.

Stick it back on the table and have at it.

Actually I might use a piece of paper instead of masking tape. Masking tape stretches.

LES A W HARRIS
07-09-2007, 05:21 PM
Lee,

Have not read the method; I was taught this long ago.
http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e97/CURVIC9/LATHEWORK/VCADD4__09072007_150521.jpg
Select even multiple larger than Pi * D, swing arc run vertical from last point to intersect arc. Line from origin to intersect it, in example 4.00 dia, then use 14" arc, this divides every two inches, seven divisions, vertical lines down to intersect.

Cheers,

Mike Burdick
07-09-2007, 05:31 PM
I don' know if this is what you're referring to but here is a description of graphical division...

1. Draw a horizontal line the length of the circumference - call the endpoints of it A and B.
2. Draw another line from point A that is 7 units long (use a scale or dividers) at any angle - call its endpoints A and C. Make tic marks at the units.
3. Draw a line from point C to point B.
4. Now draw parallel lines to CB and locate them at the tics.
Line AB will now be divided equally into 7 segments.


Note: the units along AC can be anything you want as long as they are the same length. Basically what is happening is that the unitís length is being projected on to the line to be divided which is line AB.

texas_po_boy
07-09-2007, 06:45 PM
I have to say it never fails to amaze me how intelligent this group is on just about any subject. A school in its self. I was once told that anything was easy if you knew how to do it.

lane
07-09-2007, 09:47 PM
I have to say it never fails to amaze me how intelligent this group is on just about any subject. A school in its self. I was once told that anything was easy if you knew how to do it.
IT is not in how to do it .But who to ask.

Lee in Texas
07-10-2007, 12:19 AM
Les-
That's what I was looking for. Gingery showed how to do it with pencil and paper. It will certainly work well enough for a non-working display model.

Thanks, Lee

Magic9r
07-11-2007, 05:47 PM
Gingery Method?
That'd be the long slow way justifiable by having no immediate need to make a component and having nothing better to do and not wanting a machine that's likely to last would it?
:D
Regards,
Nick

Lee in Texas
07-11-2007, 11:00 PM
Gingery Method?
That'd be the long slow way justifiable by having no immediate need to make a component and having nothing better to do and not wanting a machine that's likely to last would it?
:D
Regards,
Nick


I have all of his books except the one on the drill press. As others have said, at the time they were written, used machines were hard to find and expensive. At the time, they made more sense. They make interesting reading.

For someone who wants to get into machining as a hobby, they are really nice to have. I'm a plumber and I'm not going to be a machinist by trade. Plumbing is just too stable. I tried getting hired on as an apprentice machinist, just so I could learn something. No luck there. I tried taking a class, but in Austin, the one class available couldn't get the minimum of 10 students. The nearest class is 90 miles away. That's a no-go. So for me, they're neat little books. (I bought a Soouth Bend and a Bridgeport, so I will not be making machines with a flimsy machine...that I made:) ) I'll be ordering some videos when finances get better (I'm an apprentice plumber for another few months)

lazlo
07-11-2007, 11:53 PM
Hey Lee, are you also in Austin? You should come by sometime and I'll give you a shop tour (Burke Knee Mill, Clausing 5914 lathe, Brown & Sharpe No. 5 Tool & Cutter Grinder).

Shoot me a PM and you can come over and share a couple of cold ones...

Lee in Texas
07-12-2007, 01:55 AM
Hey Lee, are you also in Austin? You should come by sometime and I'll give you a shop tour (Burke Knee Mill, Clausing 5914 lathe, Brown & Sharpe No. 5 Tool & Cutter Grinder).

Shoot me a PM and you can come over and share a couple of cold ones...

What? Beer? PM inbound :D

Bill Pace
07-12-2007, 09:23 AM
I'll have to stand up for Dave Gingery also--- He got me started in this fun hobby. As mentioned, his series of how-to's were written in another era .... For instance a "simple calculator" couldnt be picked up at walmart for $4.95. The small machine market was almost non existant for the HSM, and the few that were beginning to appear on the scene were unknown to newbies like myself and many others. So the prospect of "Building your OWN lathe" was a very exciting prospect. The idea of the "charcoal furnace", and its improvements, is still an excellent tool to have around most anyones shop...I still break my propane powered one out occasionally to make up some piece that would otherwise be unavailabe.

No question,--- his little lathe, mill, planer/shaper, etc are pretty hokey, looking at them today, but they COULD be made functional....and the thrill of MAKING them ----AHHHH---to my unskilled/untrained eye at the time---- well, I had a LOT of fun doing Mr Gingerys projects. Building the shaper has to rank as one of my all-time favorite projects....

I would think Gingerys series of books are still a good way for a newbie to ease into this hobby,--- though being 30odd yrs old now, the methods/materials can be a bit of a problem. For instance, the Atkinson "Differential" and "Cycle" engines he and his son designed are very unique and challenging projects. Heres a shot of them, the Cycle on the left and Differential on right, all of this is from casting made using a charcoal furnace inspired variation to propane
(the other little engine is an Upshur hit-n-miss....flywheels and base cast with the Gingery-type furnace)
http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b301/pace1980/IMG_0125.jpg

Lee in Texas
07-12-2007, 09:30 AM
Cool projects, Bill. I also want to get into metal casting. I wanna make some custom valve covers for a Ford 351 going in my '88 Mustang.

oh yeah back to the OP: the tape I can make using the graph paper will get wrapped around my Sherline rotary table and help make a non-functional model of an R-4360 engine (radial, 4 rows of seven cylinders). A neat, expedient way to get an odd number without a dividing head or cnc rotary table.