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aostling
07-14-2007, 07:04 PM
Here is another of the oddities I found at the Jerome mining museum. This lathe was in a darkened shed, covered in dust. It was behind chicken wire so I could not get closer to photograph any more details.

Tony's lathe archives has no record of the Smith-Drum. Does anybody know its history?

http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/Smith-Drumlathe.jpg

Rookie machinist
07-14-2007, 08:13 PM
Guessing you are long gone, but if you talk to the guy who runs the saw mill he knows the backround on most everything up there.

aostling
07-14-2007, 08:42 PM
Guessing you are long gone, but if you talk to the guy who runs the saw mill he knows the backround on most everything up there.

Yes, I intend to return. Since closing-time was impending I had no time for questions. There are lots of trucks, including a Packard.

platypus2020
07-14-2007, 09:31 PM
Covered in dust?, in some of the old paper mills or foundries that I've work in, that would be considered clean and ready to use and probably "the pride of the fleet" in their maintenance shops.

Jack

aostling
07-15-2007, 02:11 AM
Covered in dust?, in some of the old paper mills or foundries that I've work in, that would be considered clean and ready to use and probably "the pride of the fleet" in their maintenance shops.

Jack

Jack,

Maybe you can tell me, is this a gap bed lathe? If so, the gap seems too short to be useful.

don58
07-18-2007, 10:38 PM
if you find out anything else about the smith drum lathe i would really like to know about it,i have a smith drum lathe,it is a sliding gapbed lathe,wish i could find a manual for it.
thanks
don

kendall
07-18-2007, 11:21 PM
looks like a sliding bed lathe, either way would look real sweet in my shop.

Ken

aostling
07-18-2007, 11:41 PM
if you find out anything else about the smith drum lathe i would really like to know about it,i have a smith drum lathe,it is a sliding gapbed lathe,wish i could find a manual for it.
thanks
don

Don,

You appear to have a rare machine. What can you tell us about the history of your Smith-Drum? What is it's size?

The one I saw is in the Jerome Ghost Town Museum. This is run by a man (who wears a hillbilly hat and runs the sawmill) and a woman (who tends the gift shop which all must pass through). I saw no other proprietors during my visit. Nor can I find any web page, with a phone number.

http://www.inn-california.com/arizona/yavapaiC/jerome/ghosttown.html shows some photos of the place. It is even messier (and more wonderful) now. I'll go back in a few months, and try to learn more about the lathe.

aostling
07-18-2007, 11:54 PM
looks like a sliding bed lathe, either way would look real sweet in my shop.

Ken

I'm intrigued. Who else made a sliding gap-bed lathe?

oldtiffie
07-19-2007, 12:33 AM
Deleted/erased-out

kendall
07-19-2007, 03:06 AM
Don't know how many were made but have run into a couple but not at a price I was wanting to go with
only current items I found on a quick search, on the bay, item number 180139380646
and:
http://www.vannattabros.com/shop22.html

also griffiths site:
http://www.lathes.co.uk/harrington/
http://www.lathes.co.uk/fayscott/page2.html

Would love to have the smith-drum in the garage.

I can see the sliding bed being very handy in a mining town, much easier to haul a lathe which could be broken down into more manageable components and still have the capacity of a larger lathe.

ken.

TECHSHOP
07-19-2007, 03:40 AM
The lathe in my ol'mans (Pop's) shop was "a sliding bed" lathe, while I don't know the model# or maker, it was larger than the lathe in the picture. He bought it (well) used around 1973. Being the "backward boy" I was then, I thought all lathes were just like his. Kind of embarrassing when you think the "exception" is the "rule", no?

oldtiffie
07-19-2007, 07:14 AM
Deleted/erased-out

platypus2020
07-19-2007, 10:01 AM
There was a sliding gap lathe in the machine shop run by my grandfather, it had 2 sets of ways, and the top section could be moveback to open the gap, it could be opened about 2 foot. My great uncle, who also worked there, said it was rarely used, as it took about an hour to move the top bed, everything on the bed had to be loosened, the bed moved, then retightened, and then retrued before any work could be done. As all of the people involved are now no longer with us, have no idea of the manufacturer, I do remember it was driven by an overhead flat belt drive system.

Jack