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View Full Version : wringer washer - any ideas?



snowman
08-10-2007, 08:26 AM
Lehmans hardware sells a nice laundry wringer for the small price of only 187.50.

I desperately want one for the laundry to reduce on the gas bill.

Does anyone have any suggestions for what one could use? It cannot stain clothing. It seems that the old maytag rollers, even on Ebay, go for quit a sum of money.

So ingenious blokes...what could be used instead, that would NOT tear up clothing?...and would NOT leave marks on clothing.

SGW
08-10-2007, 08:43 AM
Your washing machine doesn't have a spin cycle? A clothes wringer won't get clothes any dryer (or not much dryer) than the spin cycle does.

But if you are thinking of washing in a tub then wringing out the clothes...are you aiming to make the complete wringer, or do you just need replacement rollers for one you already have?

Rusty Marlin
08-10-2007, 08:49 AM
Just keep your tit out of it.

:ducking for cover: :)

Evan
08-10-2007, 08:58 AM
Silicone rubber covered fuser rolls from a large photocopier would be excellent.

Go with the spin cycle instead. Maybe hop up the rpms a bit. Washing machines here are wimps. They only go to maybe 200 or 300 gees. In Europe they sell washers that do 1000 gees. The clothes come out nearly dry. Don't try it on the cat.

Dawai
08-10-2007, 09:13 AM
Do you have a stream or creek close by?

I remember seeing someone in the 60s with a tub in the back of thier truck. Every week they'd load it with clothes and water-soap then drive to town. All the sloshing around going down the gravel road washed the clothes better than a maytag.
He hung his clothes up on a line.
I remember people using wash-boards in the bath tub. I'll continue to use our washing machine.

I saw a old gas powered washer somewhere recently. Had a wheel you kick started.

I bet you can still get replacement rollers. NOW the saftey features of the newer ones, when something like a arm went it, it'd pop a link on the side. It saved my brothers arm, he went up to the arm pit.

"""FLASH""""" you are looking in the wrong spot.. Check out the HAZ waste and Oil reclaimer wringers.. they fit on a 5 gallon bucket.. TVA buys them somewhere... They roll old Diapers and get the oil out of them., a hand roller that looks kinda like a mop wringer on a bucket. They use diapers to soak up spills.

hoof
08-10-2007, 10:04 AM
Just a thought, I've seen Lab centafuges ? (spelling) go on Ebay for a hundred or so bucks The big one's. If thoes didn't get your stuff dry what would ?

PTSideshow
08-10-2007, 10:11 AM
He you go for gas powered Maytags ect http://www.smokstak.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=59
They are collectible Have one down the basement that I used to use in dying the foam rubber for custom work. the rollers get real hard with age.
Also have a hand cranked wringer assembly that clamps to the side of the cement style laundry tubs. I used it as press for block type printing. Haven't looked in years but they use to see them in art supply catalogs.
http://www.dickblick.com/
There was a hardware store on the web that sold all that old tech stuff. can't find the bookmark any more. it was in Missouri I believe.:D

Lew Hartswick
08-10-2007, 11:31 AM
I bet you can still get replacement rollers. NOW the saftey features of the newer ones, when something like a arm went it, it'd pop a link on the side. It saved my brothers arm, he went up to the arm pit.
.
As a matter of fact my brother did the same thing when he was about
2 or 3. Our machine (don't remember what brand) had one, I think
the top one, roller was of a softer material and larger in diameter.
It probably saved a broken arm. That must have been about 70 yrs
ago. (I'm 75 and 2 years older than him).
...lew...

J Tiers
08-10-2007, 11:55 AM
Newer front-loading washers (I know, lots of people say they are nothing but trouble) spin very fast. And not just the over-rated european ones.

The Maytags are unreliable junk, but we have a Whirlpool "Duet" washer that has been good. The top speed of the spin cycle is 1200 rpm, and the clothes come out just a bit over the "damp" stage. I notice the dryer runs MUCH less.

It uses a lot less water, also, and as a result we can set it for 'extra rinse" to get the soap out, and still use significantly less water than the old top-loader did. So far (3 or 4 years) we are quite pleased.

greyhawk200
08-10-2007, 01:45 PM
I saw a old gas powered washer somewhere recently. Had a wheel you kick started.
My brother cobbled up a Harley twin on a May tag someone gave mom. I was about 4 (75 now) it scared Hell out of me. My brother would get it started for her and it would go till it ran out of gas since mom didn't know how to shut it off.

Evan
08-10-2007, 04:56 PM
I was rooting around in some of my stuff the other day and found a box I had completely forgotton about. It contains all the bits of an old iron horse washing machine motor with kick start. I just have to put it back together. I don't recall why I took it apart although I believe I was fooling around trying to use it as a compressor. That was over 30 years ago. I understand those things are worth some money these days.

snowman
08-10-2007, 05:22 PM
washing machine spin cycles get maybe 50% of the water out, the spinners at laundromats get up to 90% of the water out. Wringers are around 80-90% as well. It will save A LOT of money with the gas bill.

pcarpenter
08-10-2007, 05:25 PM
If you want to cut down on dryer time, get rid of that nasty flexible dryer vent and go with rigid aluminum dryer duct. A short straight run, kept clean can cut drying time in half. I did this when I got a new dryer maybe 10 years ago and it made a *huge* difference. When we moved into our new house, dry times went back up because some pinhead plumber decided to make the dryer vent (rigid aluminum)follow all the floor joists in the basement with about 4-5 90degree bends to get it outside. Its still on my list of things to do to cut the length of this about in half and run it diagonally where it needs to go....removing about three 90's in the process.

Seriously though, good airflow and straight clean ducts= dramatically shorter dryer time. Not overloading makes a big difference too.

Edit-- there was a local appliance repair call in show locally that went national at one point. A veteran appliance guy would actually answer your questions and even work with you via phone to troubleshoot problems. He was a big proponent of the solid ducting, having been used as a professional witness in several cases involving dryer fires...caused by the flex stuff which is just a secondary lint trap.

Paul

aboard_epsilon
08-10-2007, 06:34 PM
If you have to use a dryer and live in a cold part of the USA ..

Get a condensing one ...these don't have a vent ...and put the steam through a condenser ...then as water into a pull out container .

This water is good for your steam irons....and cars coolant system

Added bonus is that whilst drying clothes ...you can heat your house up with it ...so not chucking all the heat outside .

Yep, euro washers are crap and only have a 7 year life span.......but they are cheap .........and when worn out ............you get the latest tech when you buy new ...
which isn't really all that good in my case ...

I have an abundance of free hot water via ...my waste oil central heating and water heating system

But the euros think it's more economical to cold fill the washing machine on every cycle but the boil wash ...
they say this is most economic ..to heat it with its own built in water heater ... :(...how that adds up i don't know ..I'm myth-ed.

Maybe my next project is buiding some sort of water inlet that goes onto the hot and cold and lets in water at the temperature i want it to be and not the friggin washing machines half baked idea.

All the best.mark

J Tiers
08-10-2007, 07:17 PM
I was rooting around in some of my stuff the other day and found a box I had completely forgotton about. It contains all the bits of an old iron horse washing machine motor with kick start. I just have to put it back together. I don't recall why I took it apart although I believe I was fooling around trying to use it as a compressor. That was over 30 years ago. I understand those things are worth some money these days.

I have a couple of them. Johnson made them in the States and in Canada. Dunno about the money, got these for maybe $30 each, if that. Smallest engines I have.

You can get a manual for them still. Usually the little mixer (proto-carburetor) gets corroded to junk. It is made of something akin to zamac.

gearedloco
08-11-2007, 02:18 AM
He you go for gas powered Maytags ect http://www.smokstak.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=59
They are collectible Have one down the basement that I used to use in dying the foam rubber for custom work. the rollers get real hard with age.
Also have a hand cranked wringer assembly that clamps to the side of the cement style laundry tubs. I used it as press for block type printing. Haven't looked in years but they use to see them in art supply catalogs.
http://www.dickblick.com/
There was a hardware store on the web that sold all that old tech stuff. can't find the bookmark any more. it was in Missouri I believe.:D

Try <http://www.lehmans.com> They're in Ohio's Amish country and if they aint got it, nobodies got it! They've got stuff that I didn't know anyone still made. And they take orders on their web page.

Hope this helps!

GKman
08-11-2007, 09:00 AM
Harbor Freight $49.95
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=3989

snowman
08-12-2007, 12:03 AM
lol...i want something a bit more substanial than the harbor freight version, i'm thinking 3" rollers. Saw one at the flea market today, but the rollers were shot.

Anybody have any experience with the old maple roller ones?

Lehmans sells them, for 182 bucks...rather not spend that much money. I can turn out a 3" diameter maple roller, hardest part will be finding the maple. Mom and dad have a tree that needs to be cut down though.

nheng
08-12-2007, 09:01 AM
Some years back, a few laundromats around here used to have a centrifugal dryer to "pre-dry" your batch before hitting the dryers.

This one from Europe hits 1420 g.

http://www.gotoreviews.com/archives/dryers/centrifugal-clothes-dryer-spinx.html

Think chucks are scary? Wanna get hit by a load of underware from 3300 RPM? :D

aboard_epsilon
08-12-2007, 09:07 AM
them there clothes spinners were all the rage in the 70's here ....

and have long been forgotten ...

they went out of existence when fully automatic front loaders appeared on the market.

you can pick them up in most car boot sales for under a fiver.

btw my auto eurocrap machine spins at 1300 rpm ...and most new ones now go all the way up to 1500 rpm plus

these are twice the diameter of the one in your link nheng


so the result is same

btw ...thankyou very much ....been looking for ideas for centrafuge for waste oil .....and one of thiose old wringers seems to be the answer.
all the best.mark

PTSideshow
08-12-2007, 10:31 AM
lol...i want something a bit more substanial than the harbor freight version, i'm thinking 3" rollers. Saw one at the flea market today, but the rollers were shot.

Anybody have any experience with the old maple roller ones?

Lehmans sells them, for 182 bucks...rather not spend that much money. I can turn out a 3" diameter maple roller, hardest part will be finding the maple. Mom and dad have a tree that needs to be cut down though.

Here you go for all your dowels needs have used the for years buying stuff to convert into parrot toy parts.
http://midwestdowel.com/
Fast, good prices and easy to deal with.

Also if you want to try a plastic or plastic tubing covered PVC rollers here the place.http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/category.asp?catalog_name=USPlastic&Category_Name=62&Page=1&clickid=leftnav

oldtiffie
08-12-2007, 10:46 AM
Deleted/edited-out

sasquatch
08-12-2007, 06:49 PM
The "Iron Horse" engines were made in canada, by "Johnson Motors" of i think, Peterborough Ontario.

I have three, Think they were rated at 5/8 HP.

Washers also came with different brands, another i have is a B&S mod. Wmb? Rated at 1/2 HP. All had a kick start pedal. My son has a "slant "cyl. Engine, slanted like the Ironhorse,, It,s a "REO",, Reo motors, Detroit Mich.

Ray in N. Ont.

J Tiers
08-12-2007, 07:06 PM
They were also made in the States, although more were made in Canada, I believe. Same Johnson as the outboards.

Evan... Does yours have the "mixer" or a "real" carburetor?