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spope14
12-08-2001, 05:10 PM
As a teacher in the Machine Tool Field, and also a worker ect., and a newbie on this board, I love the volumes of information I have seen.

In the "Networking" section of this board, I got off track with a guy on a thread called "GOLD MINE". We got off track on safety issues and shooting the breeze on safety war stories.

In my shop I treat safety as the very most important thing I teach - first and foremost. I have my own war stories that have been thorugh the wringer so many times the students can almost quote the script as I speak it (we do not have many accidents, but I harp this) My shop also has its own legends of foolishness that live on years after they leave by word of mouth by the students, but I still like new stories from other venues. I will re-post my session from the networking area under this post, but would also ask that the many of you who are on this board post something that I can show "the troops" to show I am not a safety lunatic or safety nazi to my students -Thanks!!!

kap pullen
12-08-2001, 05:59 PM
I worked at maryland shipbuilding way back when. I was re-machining pump bodies on a horizontal boring mill.
Next to me was a young man drilling condenser plates on a radial drill.
He was seated on a box drilling and drilling the plate between his legs.
You guessed it. The chips cought his pants
and pulled them clean off, Right down to his unders.
He was very shook up and had pants burns on his legs.
The moral of this story.. Dont run a drill between your legs I guess.
take care
kapullen

C. Tate
12-08-2001, 11:52 PM
I own a small shop and had a guy working for me who was not a skilled or trained machinist. He was a good worker and made an excellent operator when there was something repetitive to do. I took him to the lathe one day (where he had worked many times before) and was showing him the operations I wanted him to perform. One of which was to remove the part from the chuck and turn it around so we could work on the other end. I had stepped on the foot brake to stop the chuck without moving the handle to the off position. This lathe is new and does not have a clutch the lever on the apron is a forward and reverse switch for the motor. When you step on the foot brake the circuit is broken and the motor stops, you have to move the lever back to the off position and then to forward or rev. to start again. I had the chuck key in the chuck and the part in my fingers and was preparing to close the chuck when he turned the lathe on. My hand was mashed between the key and ways. It took 4 hours of micro surgery to put my finger back on and I still cannot hold anything smaller than a .250 drill in my left hand.

Don't have time to discuss all of the things I did wrong that day they are to numerous to list. I will say that the most important lesson was finding out that it can happen to me.

Good luck with your students and teach them well we need skilled machinists and tool makers.

CT

[This message has been edited by C. Tate (edited 12-08-2001).]

Thrud
12-09-2001, 05:49 AM
Gents,

I have a good friend who was a woodworker for years. He was aware of the inherent dangers in his shop and was careful with power tools. One day he was ripping a board on his Delta table saw. He was not using push stick as he should have "it is just one board". The wedding ring he never took off got caught in the carbide blade. The resulting action ripped his ring finger off and the board shot back into his midsection. He fell forward and his chest landed on the still powered blade, almost severing his arm. He no longer has a ring finger and was in rehab for 2 years. His wife sold all his tools.

A Swedish toolmaker I know was one of the best craftsmen I have ever met - a true artist. He got sloppy one day while drilling a 3/8" hole in 1/4" plate. It was "just one hole" so he did not bother to clamp it. He figured even if it caught the bit he could "let it go" - no big deal - except as it (sure enough) spun around the drill press table his thumb dropped in a T-slot. He drove 2 miles my way to get a ride to the hospital which was 17 miles the other way. He lost a lot of blood and went into shock. He recovered with new repect for clamping work down.

I was a shift supervisor on the night shift doing precision brake work. The Shop Forman had asked me to insure we had spring clips for the morning. I had set a 50Ton Promecan brake with the 1"x2 1/2" (about) punch & dies for the Stainless Steel clips. This operation took the full 50 Ton capacity. I had set the press up so if a mishap was in the works, the operator might get a blood blister if he was sloppy. The guy I put on the machine had 8 years experience with press brakes. As soon as I left for my own machine, the operator changed the set-up. The net result was that he placed a piece in crooked and instead of just letting the piece get mangled he went to straighten out the piece with his thumb. The combination of his "Rythym" and the excessive open height got his thumb caught between the punch and die. His thumb blew off. He was spraying blood everywhere. I packed the wound, had 2 workers look after him, got the rest of the crew looking for thumb pieces and called 911. The ambulance arrived in a few minutes, he was already in shock and getting I.V.'s We found pieces of his thumb 30-40 feet away from the press. The Micro-surgeons were able to rebuild the thumb - looked as good as new!

In press brake work it is common to get warped pieces from punching operations. I was forming 72" end pieces for divider panels. The pieces had to be pushed tightly against the back stop to be formed correctly. Because the punches were very dull, the slots cut along the edge (to insert shelving brackets into) were extremely sharp from burrs. This meant I had to use leather gloves or have my fingers and hands lacerated. I slipped once off the backstop as the ram had contacted the piece. I pulled my hands away - the gloves were cut into two from the 250Tons of pressure. Gloves are cheap, I still have all my fingers.

I have been fortunate in only have minor boo-boos. I got a paint sliver in my eye once, broke my little toe with some structural steel, minor cuts, and flash burn from welding (crappy equipment).

Dave

[This message has been edited by Thrud (edited 12-09-2001).]

SGW
12-09-2001, 08:41 AM
Keep these stories coming, folks. I'm interviewing for a job tomorrow that would involve, as part of it, instructing students in the proper use of power tools. I can certainly go over the standard stuff -- eye protection, no jewelry, keep your hair out of the way, etc. -- but I think it would be really useful if, after doing the routine lecture, I could hand out a stack of horror stories about what happens if you DON'T do those things.

Of course, I may not get the job, anyway, but I'm trying to be optimistic!

halfnut
12-09-2001, 09:50 AM
spope14,

Biggest wreck I remember back in high school vo-tech class was 3 dummies running the surface grinder. It was a team effort, one on each each end pushing table, third cranking the cross feed. Of course one pushed a bit too fast and the table rised up, pieces of wheel all over shop. Luckily nobody hurt, amazing that there wasn't. They never did that again.

I still have 8 fingers and 2 thumbs, trimmed the end of left index finger with a skill saw when I was 16, still can play the fiddle.

Got a knot on my right thumb, was running in a big tap under power with center and cresent wrench, had a moment of confusion with forward reverse switch, ouch. I have a big ugly dril chuck in my box now for these jobs, my thumb wouldn't take it again.

Had a leadman helping me change a set of forks on a forktuck one day back when I was playing forktruck mechanic, thought he knew what he was doing, not. Broke a few toes, foot changed into wonderful varieties of colors. Would have kicked him if I could have hobbled over to him fast enough.

Working as a mechanic in a truck shop, no safety glasses furnished, should have brought in my own. Got a piece of steel in eye from a chop saw. Wasn't fun having it dug out, not a bit. Would have been cheaper for company to furnish a hood of safety glasses than to pay doctor bill.

Working in a cold shop one day I had my coat removed by the leadscrew of a Southbend Lathe, glad the coat fit loose, I shucked it off.

Been working in a shop of some sort for 23 years now, guess I'm lucky.

spkrman15
12-09-2001, 05:59 PM
i have oonly had my lathe/mill for about 3 months. I do my best to becareful and i can hear myself double checking my actions when i say; " Ahh it is just one hole!" etc. we have all been there.

I was polishing a piece of metal on my lathe at its slowest speed. I figured i was been safe. For some reason i beleived that holding the sandpaper in my hand was ok. i figured it would always just rip if anything happened. Hmm WRONG. I tightened the sandpaper by pinching it close on the metal. Wham my hand when aroud the work. Luckuly it wasn't between centers or i would have no hand today. Everything is ok just a load more respect for the lathe and my thumb seems to shake everytime i polish work....using the toolpost to hold the sandpaper.

Spkrman

bdarin
12-09-2001, 06:27 PM
Saw a picture in a safety bulletin once....a piece of "shrapnel" off a lathe somehow went flying and landed square in the middle of the left lens of the guy's safety glasses, about 1/4" from the center of his eyeball. Stuck in the glasses, saved his eye. Like Norm Abram says "always wear your safety glasses".

Not paying attention has cost me the end of one finger on a roughing mill, another one on a joiner, and yet another one on a table saw. All fingers were repaired and good as new today, but only cuz I been lucky. Never put your hands where you can't see your fingers, or you may never see them again.

farmwrench
12-09-2001, 08:47 PM
A mechanic at a local shop got himself a new toy from the Snap-On guy. High speed air grinder, cut off (CRS setting in). He put a new disk in it and reved it up. The disk was a cheepie and was ratted for 1/2 the speed of his new tool and he just let it sing WFO. The disk bust and 1/2 went off a plate of steel leaned againt the wall and cut clear to his femer. Almost bleed to death and we dont want to talk about the infection that came on a week later.
The best was one I have to find better refrences since I heard this on a morning radio program. They had a safty expert on to talk about weired/nasty industrial boo-boos. He said the worst was a guy who liked to "get off" by rubbing "his you know what" against the running belt of his lathe. (I thought yea right but it gets worse) Well he got cought and lost a nut. But instead of finding some ice and running for a doc. he just stapled himself up and went back to work. Finnaly passed out. I wish someone could confirm this story.

I also know of 4 fingers lost to table saws. One eye lost to a screwdriver. (use a knife to open UPS packages) Lots of skin lost to gas being dripped on a bare bulb under a car. one guy cut in half by a falling truck hoist. One good friend killed by no breaks on a payloader (had to get the job done) But more even more people have bought it with cars/booze or cars/stupid than I can keep track of.

SLink
12-09-2001, 11:02 PM
I broke my middle right finger trying to stop a 24" round by 5" thick from falling out of the four jaw chuck when i was trying to set it up in a lathe. I had just taken the clamp off the part and moved the hoist. The part started to fall then I caught the part. My finger stopped at the carbide insert in the tool post. It only took about nine weeks to get back to using my fingers again.

kap pullen
12-10-2001, 12:50 AM
My friend chuck was running the Cinncinatti roll grinder behind me at the keyway mill.
Big boss big Al comes around giving a tour.
Chuck wants to show off rapids the wheel head back, moves the table over to dress the wheel in a smoothe motion.
The wheel smacks the side of the dresser,
and blows apart. As I dived behind the keyway mill I can see chuck dancing the jig trying to hit that big red stop button.
Didn't see what Al did.
Nobudy hurt that time but sure embarassed.

Dennis is running the 84" planer. After hitting the cycle start notices he left his planer gage on the table.
The table is backing up so he reaches for the tool.
The "broad nose tool" takes 1 and 1/2 fingers before starting its cut. Must have been going faster than he thought.


Joe rigs a large part for the crane using a 2" eye bolt out the side of the part. Eye bolts are made to be used vertically, load in line with the thread.
Half way down the shop the bolt breaks, the part drops on Charlies Gerstner box.
The box is in pieces not much bigger than match sticks.
Big Al bought a Kennedy box to replace the wood one.

Be safe. Be aware what's going on around you.
kapullen

Daubie
12-10-2001, 04:36 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by spope14:
As a teacher in the Machine Tool Field, and also a worker ect., and a newbie on this board, I love the volumes of information I have seen.

In the "Networking" section of this board, I got off track with a guy on a thread called "GOLD MINE". We got off track on safety issues and shooting the breeze on safety war stories.

In my shop I treat safety as the very most important thing I teach - first and foremost. I have my own war stories that have been thorugh the wringer so many times the students can almost quote the script as I speak it (we do not have many accidents, but I harp this) My shop also has its own legends of foolishness that live on years after they leave by word of mouth by the students, but I still like new stories from other venues. I will re-post my session from the networking area under this post, but would also ask that the many of you who are on this board post something that I can show "the troops" to show I am not a safety lunatic or safety nazi to my students -Thanks!!!</font>
----------------------------
Hi,

Right out of high school I built houses for several years, then joined the US NAVY SEABEES Reserve for 8 years. In the NAVY, safety is paramount! If you can't do it safely---don't do it, until you can find a way to do so. In carpentry I always respected the power tools, it was that darn sheetrock knife and handsaw that got me, I didn't respect them, until I got cut a few times, luckily not too badly, then I did learn to respect them. I have walked off a couple of civilian jobs because of safety issues, you can always get another job---if you are still alive to do so.

In the machine shop, I have mostly heard horror stories, and have gotten myself some pretty neat scars but nothing too serious. My worse accident was I severed my tendon to my left hand middle finger pulling material out of the material rack, I had leather gloves on, too! I was in one of my rare moments when I was moving way too quicky, at the end of the shift, trying to get something completed. The cut tendon didn't bleed at all, but it sure did burn! My finger just hung down, couldn't get it to return to neutral position.
Lucky for me I got a darn good LADY surgeon. The worse part of the whole ordeal was getting the Novacaine injections, I swear she was shoving glass thru my hand!

My father-in-law worked up to BELL AIRCRAFT in Buffalo, NY during WWII building P-39's for RUSSIA. Chuck Yeager did his flight training on these babies. The engine was behind the pilot's seat. If you got these in a spin, the centrifical force would make it damn hard to bail out(pre-injection seat days), that is why RUSSIA got them, US pilots didn't like them, that is what I was told.

Up at BELL a guy ran a big planer making spars, I think, for the wings. The operator actually sat above/on the tool bit. Somewhere during this operation, one unfortunate day, the operator was not paying attention, was looking the other way, a big piece in a drill press set up broke free of the clamps while being drilled by another guy in an adjacent department, it spun around freely and nicely cut this guy's head clean off, blood everywhere! That is the worst scenario I have heard about.

A few years back I worked in a shop manufacturing steam valves, various sizes. There was an old timer there that worked and ran the old BULARD vertical lathes, turning 1/2 to 2 ton body castings. He always came to work dressed up wearing a TIE!!?? He had been there several years, but one day that tie got caught in the work, grabbed and spun him around in the work, merry-go-round like, but not so merry. By the time they stopped the machine he was dead!! Just like that!

I saw where a guy was running a DUMORE tool post grinder on a lathe, he moved a wee-bit too aggressively, blew up the OD grinding wheel, as the wheel disintegrated it went thru his hand and thru the roof 30 feet away!

I have been told it feels like you have gotten hit in the face with a sledge hammer when a cut-off wheel explodes and disintegrates doing cutoff work on a surace grinder as a result of a boo-boo and being too aggressive.

I can't remember the name of the machine. There is a CNC lathe, maybe a MAZAK?, that is notorious for throwing the chucked part out of the jaws, and thru the sliding door enclosure, and 30 feet away down the aisle. Moral to this story---don't stand in front of the door, better off to the side.

Less dramatic, I have seen where taps have broken, shattered safety glasses, but didn't go through them. WEAR YOUR SAFETY GLASSES!

Be very careful polishing small internal diameters. Use a wooden dowel or steel rod with a saw cut down the end for crocus cloth, wrapped around a few turns, better than losing a finger tip or more.

I've seen girls and long hair guys lose hair and scalp and blood getting hair tangled in a drill in a drill press. Better to wear a hair net.

My Rules: Don't wear rings or gloves while working around rotating machinery. No long sleeve shirts, tuck shirt in, better yet, wear an apron. Know where your hands are at all times and where they are going to be. Try to be aware. Don't be distracted. T-H-I-N-K!!


Kurt

wulfesinger67
12-10-2001, 05:45 AM
I too have heard this story but then again i have heard the one about bigfoot too ...so dont know if its true but if it is i bet the feller that did it does not have a need for viagra now!!!!00000


<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by farmwrench@aol:
A mechanic at a local shop got himself a new toy from the Snap-On guy. High speed air grinder, cut off (CRS setting in). He put a new disk in it and reved it up. The disk was a cheepie and was ratted for 1/2 the speed of his new tool and he just let it sing WFO. The disk bust and 1/2 went off a plate of steel leaned againt the wall and cut clear to his femer. Almost bleed to death and we dont want to talk about the infection that came on a week later.
The best was one I have to find better refrences since I heard this on a morning radio program. They had a safty expert on to talk about weired/nasty industrial boo-boos. He said the worst was a guy who liked to "get off" by rubbing "his you know what" against the running belt of his lathe. (I thought yea right but it gets worse) Well he got cought and lost a nut. But instead of finding some ice and running for a doc. he just stapled himself up and went back to work. Finnaly passed out. I wish someone could confirm this story.

I also know of 4 fingers lost to table saws. One eye lost to a screwdriver. (use a knife to open UPS packages) Lots of skin lost to gas being dripped on a bare bulb under a car. one guy cut in half by a falling truck hoist. One good friend killed by no breaks on a payloader (had to get the job done) But more even more people have bought it with cars/booze or cars/stupid than I can keep track of.</font>

kap pullen
12-10-2001, 11:05 AM
Wayne was running the 100" Sellers boring mill.The job was grinding carbon segments for a seal.
It was constant up and down of the head.
The machine had no crank,just a wheel to turn to run the head up.
Wayne jury rigged a crank.
After running the job several weeks he's notified of a promotion to an office job.
He threw the head in rapid, the crank spun around and knocked him clean across the shop.
He's lucky to live to get that office job.
He had two black eyes and a mess in his pants.
Keep your mind on the job.
Kapullen

Thrud
12-11-2001, 12:20 AM
I just remembered a article that was circulated by Workers Compensation here in Alberta:

A welder was working on a pressure vessel when a molten spatter ball rolled into his workshirt pocket. Everything was fine until it hit his Bic disposable butane lighter. The ball melted through the lighter's casing and detonated the butane. It left a 12" hole through his chest, he was killed instantly - leaving his wife and two small kids to fend for themselves...

Dave

spope14
12-11-2001, 09:31 AM
Here is my post from the "GOLD MINE" Thread

CHUCK KEYS - no matter how much you think you know, or how invincible you think you are, or that nobody will ever see you sin when you do it once - NEVER LEAVE THE FREAKING THINGS IN A CHUCK NO MATTER HOW EXPERIENCED OR INVINCIBLE OR PERFECT YOU THINK YOU ARE!!! Only once has somebody been burned by this in my school shop, I have a mark on a wall 11 feet off the deck, and 22 feet from the machine where a stupid know more than I ever will launched a key from a 10 inch chuck. Guy left a wet clean up spot for me on this one. I show the mark once. Somebody sins once, they do all safety testing again. Twice they get three days out of class. Three times I fire them (well let them loose from my class roster). These things usually hit someone else than the operator.

Second one, never think a moving part or cutter or wheel is safe. Let them stop, and by themself to boot. make sure all items to be used are clamped down TIGHT!!!!! I have a wall of fame that is but a few parts in 14 years of teaching, but these few busted cutters and parts sure make a statement. None in the last three years.

Loose clothing. In teaching, students think it is a personal RIGHT to dress with baggy stuff, loose chains, rings, and such. One kid decided to pull out his shirt and be cool while threading, got it caught between the thread indicator dial and leadscrew. ripped it right off at the half way point. All it took was ten seconds from untuck to show he was a "big bad guy who could do what he wants" to "suck down". Five years later, the guy graduated, his legend lives on by word of mouth.

Safety glasses - with side shields, tight to the face!!!! HERE IS THE SPEC---Z87 STANDARD FOR IMPACT. Here is how i show this. Safety glasses eventually get scratched up. I save the real beaters, and each year on day two, when all troops have glasses, I take out an old lens, hold it in a vise grip, get out a ball peen hammer, and beat the living heck out of the lens on a piece of wood or an anvil. Never shatters, never breaks off. An old teacher friend of mine used to "test drive" the safety glasses - literally - by tieing them on a rope behind his car, and driving about two miles from the school, then back. They live, we consider them.

I run a tight ship, and for a reason, I work safe because i have a kid and wife who i need to support and hug, and because i love machining so very much I do not want to forgo my fun by being hurt.

Daubie
12-11-2001, 10:14 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by spope14:
Here is my post from the "GOLD MINE" Thread

CHUCK KEYS - no matter how much you think you know, or how invincible you think you are, or that nobody will ever see you sin when you do it once - NEVER LEAVE THE FREAKING THINGS IN A CHUCK NO MATTER HOW EXPERIENCED OR INVINCIBLE OR PERFECT YOU THINK YOU ARE!!! Only once has somebody been burned by this in my school shop, I have a mark on a wall 11 feet off the deck, and 22 feet from the machine where a stupid know more than I ever will launched a key from a 10 inch chuck. Guy left a wet clean up spot for me on this one. I show the mark once. Somebody sins once, they do all safety testing again. Twice they get three days out of class. Three times I fire them (well let them loose from my class roster). These things usually hit someone else than the operator.

Second one, never think a moving part or cutter or wheel is safe. Let them stop, and by themself to boot. make sure all items to be used are clamped down TIGHT!!!!! I have a wall of fame that is but a few parts in 14 years of teaching, but these few busted cutters and parts sure make a statement. None in the last three years.

Loose clothing. In teaching, students think it is a personal RIGHT to dress with baggy stuff, loose chains, rings, and such. One kid decided to pull out his shirt and be cool while threading, got it caught between the thread indicator dial and leadscrew. ripped it right off at the half way point. All it took was ten seconds from untuck to show he was a "big bad guy who could do what he wants" to "suck down". Five years later, the guy graduated, his legend lives on by word of mouth.

Safety glasses - with side shields, tight to the face!!!! HERE IS THE SPEC---Z87 STANDARD FOR IMPACT. Here is how i show this. Safety glasses eventually get scratched up. I save the real beaters, and each year on day two, when all troops have glasses, I take out an old lens, hold it in a vise grip, get out a ball peen hammer, and beat the living heck out of the lens on a piece of wood or an anvil. Never shatters, never breaks off. An old teacher friend of mine used to "test drive" the safety glasses - literally - by tieing them on a rope behind his car, and driving about two miles from the school, then back. They live, we consider them.

I run a tight ship, and for a reason, I work safe because i have a kid and wife who i need to support and hug, and because i love machining so very much I do not want to forgo my fun by being hurt.

</font>
Hi,

Sounds to me like you are doing a damn fine job with running a tight ship. The toolmaker I learned under was a HARD guy. I never did shop in school, wasn't interested then, no girls in shop classes! Lots of girls in the music program. I did do mechanical drawing, though. Anyway, the toolmaker would never compliment my good work, always would hear it from somebody else, quoting him. But, he taught me well. I hated his guts, and I think he hated mine, as it should be, HA! I still have all 10 fingers, and I'm not dead yet. The first year in the trade is the hardest, learning what you need to know just to get by and living thru it, going the distance that far. Here at home I catch myself every once in awhile taking shortcuts------never happens on the job. Ever try kicking yourself in the butt? I worked with a French toolmaker once, he was trained pre-WWII. He told me whenever he screwed up during his apprenticeship he got hard raps with a ruler on the back of the hand------now that's incentive! Some shops I've been in, you would get a heavy dose of cow manure type work, for pay back for messing up, but after a few repeat times it's out the door, goodbye!

Kurt

Daubie
12-11-2001, 10:35 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Thrud:
I just remembered a article that was circulated by Workers Compensation here in Alberta:

A welder was working on a pressure vessel when a molten spatter ball rolled into his workshirt pocket. Everything was fine until it hit his Bic disposable butane lighter. The ball melted through the lighter's casing and detonated the butane. It left a 12" hole through his chest, he was killed instantly - leaving his wife and two small kids to fend for themselves...

Dave </font>
----------------------------
Hi,

Yes, I remember that, I was in the SEABEES Navy Reserve 1974 thru 1982. During that time we had a component of ironworkers mostly out of NYCity---the rating is called STEELWORKER. Somebody had a Bic type lighter in his pocket and slag hit it, blew a guys leg off, killed him, too! I had a job then fabricating stuff by welding it together, then machining it. That sent cills down my back. Do you remember the days when pant cuffs were all the rage? Ever see a guy's pants catch fire as his cuffs fill up with slag? Good thing we kept the fire extinguisher in the welding area. A good friend in high school worked a part time job, he told me a little hard work never killed anybody. Well, he was 14 when he died, doing his part time job! Can't let your guard down for a second, always stay aware.

Kurt

Thrud
12-11-2001, 10:31 PM
Gents,

When you reply, it is often a good idea to delete the quote by highlighting then press delete. It makes it easier to read and will save the BBS some valuable diskspace. Just a suggestion.

Dave

toff
12-11-2001, 11:21 PM
Hi,
If you have an all male class as I was in about 45 years ago, The instructor said:
"If you can't count to 21 at the end of the day you have done something seriously wrong,
think about it."
I did and only got a broken thumb so far!
Think about it!
Richard

MarshSt
12-12-2001, 01:21 AM
Our safety dept posted an article a few months ago, so I don't remember all the details. I think it was NE area at a wood recycling operation. The conveyor feeding the chipper jammed up and instead of shutting it down and locking it out the guy got up on the belt with a bar or something to unjam it. He got it unjammed, but it was still running. The police department was going to run a DNA test on what came through the chipper to verify his ID for the report. Darwin at work! I work in a pretty large shop and I don't trust anyone with my safety, Lock-out is a very important skill to preach, it guarantes that nobody else will make the mistake (that you should never make) for you.

Steve