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aostling
08-17-2007, 07:17 PM
I've never noticed any messages on this forum coming from France or Germany, two countries with a combined population of almost 150 million. I wonder if the home shop machinists of mainland Europe have there own forums. Something might be happening there that we should know about.

stuntrunt
08-18-2007, 10:44 AM
I've never met any of the people that post here on any of the French or German Forums...

Evan
08-18-2007, 11:09 AM
Then again, how would you know? I speak German but not here very often. What does it matter anyway? Das ist mir ganz egal.

aostling
08-18-2007, 12:35 PM
I speak German but not here very often.

I'm envious. How did you happen to learn German?

I have not traveled much in Germany, but I was in Passau in 1995. I found that the lady running the Tourist Information office didn't speak English. I survived, but wished I'd known some German.

Now when I travel abroad I try to have the pertinent Rough Guide Phrasebook. I have found these are more useful than the Lonely Planet phrasebooks, because they are arranged alphabetically, instead of by subject. For example, I was the victim of a Vespa thief in Naples, in 2005. The Rough Guide had the appropriate sentence, under the heading of "steal." Mi hanno rubato la borsa! (My bag has been stolen!)

The same entries are found in all the different language versions of the Rough Guides. In Dutch it is mijn tas is gestolen! But I'm assuming I won't need this phrase, when I finally get around to visiting my grandmother's girlhood town of Zwolle.

TGTool
08-18-2007, 12:57 PM
The Rough Guide had the appropriate sentence, under the heading of "steal." Mi hanno rubato la borsa! (My bag has been stolen!)



Well, to each his own and it may be much different in Europe, but here in the Bible Belt, as a guy, if my purse had been stolen I'm not sure I'd advertise the fact. :rolleyes:

Alistair Hosie
08-18-2007, 02:42 PM
I spent 5 years with my family in Germany and worked for a large dental practice specializing in orthodontic production by the time I left I was taking all medical notes in German and carrying out the instructions and writing back in german to the local hospital or clinic.I can still after 25 years speak pretty fluent german and hold a decent conversation on all aspects of life including politics etc etc it was a good time of my life.Alistair

MCS
08-18-2007, 02:59 PM
In Dutch it is mijn tas is gestolen! But I'm assuming I won't need this phrase, when I finally get around to visiting my grandmother's girlhood town of Zwolle.

Don't assume too much, Holland is not a crime free nation.

Evan
08-18-2007, 08:26 PM
I learned Danish as my first language and then English soon after. My parents spoke multiple languages and my mother worked as a real time translator occasionally. I decided to learn German about 15 years ago because I would meet many German speaking people on my canoe trips here. German is easy to learn to speak conversationally. Knowing Danish helps a lot too. Languages are a hobby of mine and I know a little something of many languages and a lot of a few.

Ries
08-19-2007, 01:07 PM
There are several german (and dutch, and even norwegian) guys who post pretty regularly over on practical machinist, mostly in the Deckel forum.

And there is also a French guy, who, by his name, is probably of vietnamese ancestry, who has an amazing machine shop in a 300 year old cellar in the south of France, with Deckels, Schaublin lathes, and other very beautiful european precision machines, who posts over there as well.
Here is a link to a great thread where he uses many of his other tools to rebuild a cute little european surface grinder-
http://www.practicalmachinist.com/cgi-bin/ubbcgi/ultimatebb.cgi/topic/30/4971.html?

So there are definitely hobby machinists in both countries.
Understandably, though, they know almost nothing about most american brands of machine tools.