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ZINOM
08-30-2007, 12:56 AM
Hey Guys,

I was thinking of picking up a hydraulic press to bend a curve into some stock (3/16 x 1/2 1018) as opposed to heating and bending in a bench vise (with less than desirable repeatability).

I have only used a press in the past for pressing bearings and removing wrist pins...I wasn't sure if this is something that the press is suited for.

I don't think I'd need anything too large for the task (I'll be bending the stock in the easy direction), but I actually don't even know what size would be needed.

Any help would be great, also, I have a Harbor Freight nearby, while normally I wouldn't buy much if anything there, let me know if that's the kinda thing that would be fine to get from them....I'm sure the cost there would be on the low end.

Thanks in advance gents!

John

justforfun
08-30-2007, 01:04 AM
Are you planning on bending the hard way or the easy way?

How many parts do you plan on bending?

What tolerance are you looking for?

Do you have to meet ISO 9000 standards or better?

Have you set up an SPC program and if so what sigma do you have to meet?

Will help. if I can.

Some requirements would be helpfull.

Roy

OM]Hey Guys,

I was thinking of picking up a hydraulic press to bend a curve into some stock (3/16 x 1/2 1018) as opposed to heating and bending in a bench vise (with less than desirable repeatability).

I have only used a press in the past for pressing bearings and removing wrist pins...I wasn't sure if this is something that the press is suited for.

I don't think I'd need anything too large for the task (I'll be bending the stock in the easy direction), but I actually don't even know what size would be needed.

Any help would be great, also, I have a Harbor Freight nearby, while normally I wouldn't buy much if anything there, let me know if that's the kinda thing that would be fine to get from them....I'm sure the cost there would be on the low end.

Thanks in advance gents!

John[/QUOTE]

Joel
08-30-2007, 01:17 AM
A small press should work fine John.

Have you considered one of these benders:

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=44094

justforfun
08-30-2007, 01:34 AM
Wish I could offer a statement like that, with no information and or a SOPE certs required.

Hope a bridge does not depend on your response. :o

Roy


A small press should work fine John.

Have you considered one of these benders:

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=44094

wierdscience
08-30-2007, 01:42 AM
If I read you right,3/16 x 1/2" 1018? Any small ratchet arbor press would do that and a lot faster than a hydraulic press.

wierdscience
08-30-2007, 01:43 AM
Wish I could offer a statement like that, with no information and or a SOPE certs required.

Hope a bridge does not depend on your response. :o

Roy

3/16 x 1/2?Hope not too:D

justforfun
08-30-2007, 01:45 AM
Wish I knew what you know.

Life would be great.

Roy


If I read you right,3/16 x 1/2" 1018? Any small ratchet arbor press would do that and a lot faster than a hydraulic press.

lazlo
08-30-2007, 02:01 AM
If I read you right,3/16 x 1/2" 1018? Any small ratchet arbor press would do that and a lot faster than a hydraulic press.

Is there such a thing as an affordable ratchet arbor press? I have one of the Enco 1 Ton non-ratcheting arbor presses, and while it has the typical lousy fit and finish that you get with Chinese tooling, it smashes things OK :)

Does anyone know of a Taiwanese ratcheting arbor press? I've been thinking about trying a "1st Tier" Chinese press from something like Grizzly, but the shipping is killer. Same deal with buying a used Dake on Ebay -- the shipping is more than the press...

I don't know if a ratcheting arbor press fits in the 75lb Enco free shipping limit, but Enco's Chinese tooling is usually bottom-of-the barrel. Maybe 1 step up from Harbor Freight ;)

Joel
08-30-2007, 02:11 AM
3/16 x 1/2?Hope not too:D

Hmmm, 1/4 x 1/2 then? :D


Wish I knew what you know.

Cool, we both wish we knew what wierdscience knows.

ZINOM
08-30-2007, 02:16 AM
I'm planning on bending the easy way, and none of the parts are of a critical nature structurally speaking....just trying to put a curve in some parts for aesthetic reasons while being able to do it efficiently and predictably.

The bender looks good, and the price seems good too....I'll look into that option a little more.

Thanks for the replies guys!

John

Peter N
08-30-2007, 03:14 AM
Are you planning on bending the hard way or the easy way?

How many parts do you plan on bending?

What tolerance are you looking for?

Do you have to meet ISO 9000 standards or better?

Have you set up an SPC program and if so what sigma do you have to meet?



That's a very "Practical Machinist" type of response for this board :D
(no offense meant Don..)

Peter

John Stevenson
08-30-2007, 04:17 AM
That's a very "Practical Machinist" type of response for this board :D
(no offense meant Don..)

Peter

Give him time Peter he's a newbie feeling his way. Mind you being able to read would help, his first qestion was "Are you doing it the hard way or easy way ?" when Zinom did state in the third paragraph which way.

I did miss the bit about using 3/16" x 1/2" to build a bridge though :D

I don't think the home shop bit has sunk in yet :rolleyes:

.

Your Old Dog
08-30-2007, 09:54 AM
Wish I could offer a statement like that, with no information and or a SOPE certs required.

Hope a bridge does not depend on your response. :o

Roy

Note to all bridge builders and engineers: If you are building public projects you might want to do your research elsewhere. This is a Home Shop Machinist forum and while it does have some professional types, it has a lot of raw, untested, rank amateurs offering their humble opinions as fact. If there's any chance anyone is using my answers where safety is of prime importance I'll have to get busy on a disclaimer signature :D

Actually, I suspect Roy was just in that "machinist frame of mind" where small details can make all the differance. I'm not "Dis-ing" you Roy, just found some humour as the board has been a little "upity" and all statements of late seem to come under a microscope.

Stepside
08-30-2007, 10:14 AM
I bought a 3 ton Jet Arbor Press. Really just a set of castings that needed some perfecting. Step one was some Teflon wear plates and deburing the ram. with a little adjustment it was a decent broaching press. The next step was to build a ratchet assembly to replace the existing handle. It is now a better press. I will try to get some pictures in the near future and post them along with some construction tecniques.

Pete

Carld
08-30-2007, 11:23 AM
for that size metal all he needs is a vise and a male/female die to form it with.

He can have the best press in the world but without a dedicated die to form the metal exactly each time it will still be guess work.

In this case it's the die set that's important, not the press.

bob_s
08-30-2007, 11:50 AM
3/16 x 1/2?Hope not too:D

Thanks!!! Really needed a laugh this AM. Of course now I have to clean-up the place, because of the nasal coffee spray.

Ries
08-30-2007, 01:36 PM
I vote for a hand bender over a press for work like this.
If you are going to make 1000 a day, every day, then a press is great.
But to build dies, and figure out springback, and get the same, predictable result, with a press, for onesies and twosies is crazy.

I use a hossfeld bender myself, and swear by it, but the smaller harbor freight models would do material this small.

The big advantage with a hossfeld style bender is no fixed tooling- the dies are designed to be moved around to accomodate different bends, its easy to make stops with vise grips and angle iron, and you can easily and intuitively find the right bend angle.

I use my big hydraulic press for hot bending stainless into fixed dies, for example, and it works great. But I spend a day building a die sometimes.

With a hand bender, you bend, check, flip it over and unbend a bit if its off, set stops, and go for it.

Carld
08-30-2007, 01:45 PM
Ries, he said, REPEATABILITY, in his opening post. To me that means he is making more than oneses twosies and he wants them all the same. Hense, the need for a repeatable die to do the job. Yep, spring back and other forces cause issues so nothing will be perfect. Hand benders are good and that may be all he needs but he seems to want a press to do them not a bender.

skeeter
08-30-2007, 04:17 PM
I have the HF pipe bender that sells for about $70. A hydraulic jack with a small frame. This has been used for bending pipe, rods, straighten shafts, etc. This has been a good purchase for my needs. Just thought I would post my thoughts on it.

Good luck on your choice.

:D

BadDog
08-30-2007, 04:22 PM
I think there are 3 different ways I might approach this.

1) Hosfeld type bender.
2) Arbor press with appropriate die.
3) Hydro press with appropriate die. I've got my 20T converted to air over hydraulic, so it's fast and easy.

In all cases, using hard stops and fixturing for repeatability.

I've also got tube benders and other options, but those 3 seem most likely for the task specified.