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deth502
09-11-2007, 02:48 PM
i just got an old excelsior 2-a power hack for $50. i have an old millers falls saw i got a while ago also. the mf needed work, i completley dissassembeled, cleaned painted, fixed, reassembeled it. when i did i noticed that it cut as it was pushing OUT, AWAY from the fixed vice jaw, thought i screwed something up on reassembley, took a while to take it all apart and figure out how to assemble it to cut on the "in" stroke, TOWARD the fixed jaw.

fired the exc up today, it was complete and running when i got it. the blade cuts on the "out" stroke, AWAY from the fixed jaw.

is this correct ??? should i change the millers falls saw back???? or do i need to work on the excelsior after all?????

platypus2020
09-11-2007, 04:40 PM
I have a 1946 Keller power hacksaw, and the manual for the saw states the teeth point toward the back of the saw and toward the fixed jaw of the vise.

Jack

Chester
09-11-2007, 06:54 PM
Used to have an "EXCEL" power hacksaw that looked a bit like this one:

http://frogvalley.com/blacksmithimages/forge%20tools/bandsaw%20and%20hacksaw.jpg

It cut best on the back stroke (teeth pointed towards the rear), 'cause on the push/return stroke the frame was lifted slightly by the link on the crankarm. Also used std 12" blades. Finally got rid of it as life was too short to stand around waiting for it to finish cutting. If I had room at the time I would have kept it around for those big jobs that could stand a week's wait.

If you have any POP MECH mags from the 40/50's you'll see that saw advertised regularly..........just like SB's were.

deth502
09-11-2007, 08:32 PM
that looks like it, only mine's missing the hanging weight, and there is a small toggle in the frame instead of the box bolted to it.it looks like it'll take 12 or 14" blades, and the vice angles on it.

you just told me what i didnt want to hear! now ill hve to take it apart and do some re-arrangeing to get it to lift on the forward stroke.

this is the one i "work" with:
http://www.grizzly.com/products/G0561

i just like these old machines. there was alot of ingenuity going into then at the time. and, for now , i have a little room to keep them. still need an old benchtop shaper (or two!!:))though, although they prob never get used in as i have a vert mill. not much of a "history buff" kinda guy, but i like these old machines!!

tattoomike68
09-11-2007, 10:03 PM
I used to think they were kind of cheesy but at one shop I worked at it was all the maintenance shop had other than a dirty old abrasive chop saw.

I was impressed with the power hacksaw, when it came to big stock it was a brute.

I saw a guy try to use it to cut stove pipe. LOL that was very funny.

Carld
09-12-2007, 12:36 AM
Are you sure it is running in the right direction???

The connecting rod should be on the bottom of the crank and pulling the saw blade into the work. On the return stroke the crank comes over the top and pushes the blade away while the holder and arm is lifted off the cut so it don't drag the blade on the cut.

deth502
09-12-2007, 07:35 AM
Are you sure it is running in the right direction???

The connecting rod should be on the bottom of the crank and pulling the saw blade into the work. On the return stroke the crank comes over the top and pushes the blade away while the holder and arm is lifted off the cut so it don't drag the blade on the cut.

there is a little arrow cast into the face of the disk that the link is attached to, and it is following the arrow.

Chester
09-12-2007, 09:46 AM
Are you sure it is running in the right direction???

The connecting rod should be on the bottom of the crank and pulling the saw blade into the work. On the return stroke the crank comes over the top and pushes the blade away while the holder and arm is lifted off the cut so it don't drag the blade on the cut.

From memory, this is how mine was set up: the crank arm was on the LHS with the geared wheel it was attached to, and rotated CW. Beginning the "cut" stroke the arm being at the "nine" o'clock position moved over the top towards the "three" o'clock position (dragging the blade), then began the "return" stroke on the bottom which pushed up on the blade's arm. In addition, it had a "saw toothed" plate with pointed weighted fingers (2) that locked the arm in the "up" position during the return stroke to ease the stress on the blade. There was a simple method of unlocking those "walking" fingers for the "cut" stroke, just don't remember the exact details though.

The saw (orig $52.75) was made by Excel Machine Tool, Benton Harbor, MI. Found a small ad/picture Pg 64 in POP MECH 12-51

Carld
09-12-2007, 11:14 AM
Well, I suppose they go the direction the manufacturer made them for but at least his is marked so he knows what direction it should turn.

I have a power hacksaw once and it seems the lifting pawls did not lift the arm if I turned it the wrong direction but that was about 12 years ago since I had the saw. Mind--blured by-----time.

deth502
09-12-2007, 04:38 PM
From memory, this is how mine was set up: the crank arm was on the LHS with the geared wheel it was attached to, and rotated CW. Beginning the "cut" stroke the arm being at the "nine" o'clock position moved over the top towards the "three" o'clock position (dragging the blade), then began the "return" stroke on the bottom which pushed up on the blade's arm. In addition, it had a "saw toothed" plate with pointed weighted fingers (2) that locked the arm in the "up" position during the return stroke to ease the stress on the blade. There was a simple method of unlocking those "walking" fingers for the "cut" stroke, just don't remember the exact details though.

The saw (orig $52.75) was made by Excel Machine Tool, Benton Harbor, MI. Found a small ad/picture Pg 64 in POP MECH 12-51

that part dosent sound framiliar, mine has an eccentric behind the crank wheel, with a "con rod" of sorts on it that causes an "up+dn" motion to a bar on a pivot.the other end of this pivoting bar pushes on a mechanism that both lifts and pulls out on a piece to lock it to the smooth bar. kind of hard to explain, but there's no "teeth" on it. and the saw is held in the "up" position by another seperate bar.

ive also heard tell that mine was made here in pa by r-something-ford ??? that made them under the excelsior name ???

deth502
09-12-2007, 04:40 PM
i do think that the bar that hold the saw in the "up " position could have been home made.

geraldvowles
09-12-2007, 06:38 PM
When you disassembled it, could you have put the disk back on backwards meaning the arrow would be pointing the wrong way?

deth502
09-12-2007, 07:10 PM
i havent dissassembled it. i was saying that i dissasembeled the first one, as it needed work, i was SURE i put everything back correctly, but it cut coming out. i re-timed the cam in it that caused the arm to raise and got it to go on the in stroke. this one cut on the out from being plugged in. IF it is ass. wrong, it was not by me.

the "show side" of the disc has an arrow, the other side is just a flat casting that faces the working gears (on both saws actually). so there's pretty much only one way.

i know of a guy who uses a power hack for gun building on a diff site, i asked him and he said his (although diffrent than both of mine), he says it cuts on the out stroke. but it just dosent seem right to me, i would think that they would want the pressure of the teeth pulling on it to work on the stronger part (fixed jaw)

from all ive seen to this point, id have to think that they are supposed to cut on the out stroke, it just seems wrong to me????????

deth502
09-12-2007, 07:14 PM
here's the post w/ a pic of his saw in it also.

warningjudging by recent arguments here, i just want to let people know before clicking on this, the article describes making a LEGAL rifle suppressor in the US. if you are offended, or beleive it to be illegal to view in your location, DO NOT CLICK.

http://livetoshoot.freeforums.org/viewtopic.php?t=81

Chester
10-07-2010, 09:35 PM
If anyone is still interested in these saws (Also sold as Craftsman #108.1501), somebody has photographed one in detail here............grab those pictures while you can.

http://cgi.ebay.ch/CRAFTSMAN-No-108-1501-POWER-HACKSAW-WITH-115-VAC-MOTOR_W0QQitemZ350371159032QQcategoryZ13876QQrdZ1Q QssPageNameZWINQ3aPOST0Q3aRECOQ3aBIDQQcmdZViewItem

bruto
10-07-2010, 10:10 PM
Most of the hacksaws I've seen cut on the return stroke, but one exception is the original Millers Falls "Star" power hacksaw (see it HERE (http://oldtoolheaven.com/history/history5.htm) . I had one of these, and it cut on the push stroke. Although it doesn't lift the blade, it unloads it on the return stroke if rotation is right way round. Mine cut quite effectively, but unfortunately was so worn that it could no longer cut straight. Needing the space, I donated it to a museum that was setting up a turn-of-20th century shop exhibit, where its appearance was more important than precision.

I just thought I'd point this out, because someone long ago gave me that saw because he couldn't get it to cut worth a damn, assuming that it cut on the return stroke.