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View Full Version : O.T. carbon nuetral question?



A.K. Boomer
09-13-2007, 11:32 PM
I was curious about the term carbon nuetral, I know whats its refering too and all but my question is this; is there a basic guidline for all plant life as to what they take in CO2 wise and what they give up oxygen , Some plants must be better than others I know but I guess what im saying is if a plant gives up so much oxygen does it equate directly (%) to the amount of co2 it temperarly stores and also --- does this mean that all the co2 storage can be acounted for (in the carbon leaves or trunk diameter increase and such)

If its a direct exchange then is it governed by photosynthesis?

Is it possible for there to be an imbalance? say a plant that produces more oxygen than the carbon that it stores in itself, a kind of carbon un-nuetral?

J Tiers
09-14-2007, 12:04 AM
Plants split CO2 in the daytime, and emit it at night. They split more than they emit, and store carbon in the form of plant tissue.

A carbon un-neutral plant would have to be a parasite, like "owl clover" or mushrooms, etc. A non-photosyntetic plant, or one which depends more on parasitic nutrient intake than on photosynthetic processes.

A.K. Boomer
09-14-2007, 01:52 AM
They split more than they emit, and store carbon in the form of plant tissue.

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If that said plant tissue either rapidly burns or slowly oxydizes does it reclaim ALL/PART/ Or MORE of the oxygen that was previously traded for the making of the carbon plant tissue?