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BadDog
09-16-2007, 01:14 AM
I've got to get some help. Like psychiatric help... Now I've gone and bought a US made 20" Wilton drill press. Big brute of a thing... that I have no room for... <sigh>

So, when I add that to my 2 surface grinders, Bridgeport, Rockwell, and assorted other things; I simply have no choice but to come up with a means of making things more mobile.

What, you don't think I am going to get rid of anything did you???

Anyway, the drill weighs only 700 lbs. Heh... Anyway, the current HF 16" drill press (anyone need a good drill press that's being replaced with something bigger than I need for no good reason?) is just barely tolerable as it sets sorta in front of a big parts bin at the head of the lathe. It's a bit in the way, but I can get around it. But the new one takes about 4 times the floor space, and there is NO wall space left.

Now to the proposed solution. I want to build something that will let me move it (and other things) easily WITHOUT making them unstable or causing trip hazards. I'm thinking something like a toe jack. Something that is sorta self locking in place, allowing easy install/remove and safe/slow/low movement within the shop.

So, first make feet/spacer/whatever for each machine to get some space underneath. Maybe 1/2". This may even include the Bridgeport and lathe (already up on adjustable feet), and certainly includes the surface grinders and new drill press.

Then there is the caster assembly. Maybe separate individual wheels? Maybe pairs with sliding beam keeping each pair in some horizontal relationship? And each with a sort of over-center pedal to lock down. On lighter stuff like the drill press, simply applying leverage by standing on the pedal and shove/rock back a bit (just to take off some weight) might be enough. On the Bridgeport, a helper with pry bar would be needed. Total up/down of maybe 1/2" tops (more like 1/4") to minimize danger with top heavy equipment.

So, I've got some ideas along those lines. Anyone got some examples? Suggestions? I would like to build 1 "setup" and use as needed. I don't really want to have expense or clutter of separate casters for every piece, and REALLY don't want it on wheels 24/7 for a variety of fairly obvious reasons...

Pics, suggestions, examples, or even "Doh!" slaps are much appreciated. Can you help a very sick fellow member find a way to fit more equipment he doesn't need in among all the other equipment he didn't need and doesn't know how to use??? :o

For those who may be interested, this (http://cgi.ebay.com/WILTON-WSG-TWENTY-VARIABLE-SPEED-DRILL-PRESS_W0QQitemZ130139431169QQihZ003QQcategoryZ1257 9QQrdZ1QQssPageNameZWD1VQQcmdZViewItem) is a similar unit, though the one I bought is both much nicer and MUCH less expensive. One of those "can't pass it up" deals, or so it seemed at the time...

platypus2020
09-16-2007, 12:07 PM
BadDog,

At work to move small modular boilers around, we use a cart, similar to the one posted below, the boiler is rised about 3/4 -1" and the this is assembled underneath, not the most convienent(?) system, but it does work. We screw the leveling feet all the way down, assemble the cart, then lower the boiler on to the cart. Ours is shop made, not bought, and its made out of 3 x 3 x 1/4" angle iron corners and adjustable side of 1 x 2 " box tubing, and we use it to move 1500-2000# boilers that are very top heavy with very little problem.

Jack

http://www.grizzly.com/products/g7315

aostling
09-16-2007, 12:35 PM
I don't really want to have expense or clutter of separate casters for every piece, and REALLY don't want it on wheels 24/7 for a variety of fairly obvious reasons...


Russ,

Perhaps something akin to the Ikea solution (but much beefier) http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=23770&highlight=ikea+solution could be devised. Two non-caster wheels, and two feet, under your 700-pound drill press might be solid enough. You'd still need an over-center dolly to lift up the feet when shifting the machine.

Weston Bye
09-16-2007, 01:30 PM
How tall is the brute? Could you stand to add 4" to the working height? Add a weldment underneath with fork pockets for a pallet jack - presuming you have room to manouver and a reasonably smooth floor. Where I work, small ladies routinely move 900# spools of wire and loaded pallets with pallet jacks.
The jacks can range from full size to short/narrow forks.

Your Old Dog
09-16-2007, 01:46 PM
Don't know if you'll be able to follow this or not.

I once made a macho welding table portable by making two plate steel triangles. I then drilled holes in one end of the triangles and fitted and axle shaft and hard wheels. Then rolled this assembly up to my welding table and welded it so that all 4 table legs were on the floor AND the wheels also rested on the floor. Then I had a hand dolly something like used to dolly trailers around a lot by hand. Now, when I pushed down on the dolly it raised that end AND the other side so that all the weight was on the triangle/wheel assembly and none on any of the legs. It was simple matter to move it around. Very cheap to do and the beauty part of it all was it made me feel like I knew what I was doing as it worked quite well !!

Have you thought about a bigger mortgage? :D

BadDog
09-16-2007, 03:08 PM
platypus:
That's kinda what I have in mind, but more "quick assembly" with telescoping tubes and using the principles of toe jacks. But that's basically it...

aostling:
Yeah, thought about that too. In fact,that's what I use on my little band saw right now. Thinking of doing something similar for my pedestal grinders too. But on the big stuff, I would rather have it sitting on the wheels (when mobile) to just push around. I don't have room for a lever/handle dolly to swing around. If I had that kind of room, I wouldn't be having this problem... :D

Wes1:
4" wouldn't be a problem for the height. But as with aostling's suggestion, I have no room for the pallet jack travel. If the pallet jack were about the size of a B'pt base, it MIGHT work, but my walking paths have become quite small.

YOD:
I understand just fine. As already stated, I've used it myself and do have plans for it on some other things. But for the big boys, when mobile, I just want to be able to shove them where-ever, perhaps with a hand hook/rod to keep from pushing high and toppling. But being force to use a handle dolly (used to have one like that from a warehouse, very nice) would present problems in my crowded shop.


Much thanks for the suggestions guys. If you have any further thoughts, keep 'em coming...

Evan
09-16-2007, 03:48 PM
When I built the center work bench for my shop I wanted to be able to move it around. Loaded up it weighs at least as much as that drill press. I put some casters on it with a simple mechanism that makes it easy to lift the bench only 1/4 inch higher onto the casters. The casters are small but the wheels are cast iron so they handle the load ok.

http://vts.bc.ca/pics2/casterbench1.jpg

http://vts.bc.ca/pics2/caster3.jpg

I could see doing the same sort of thing on the corners of a 1/2" steel plate that the DP would sit on. Instead of permanent step on levers just use something similar to a jack handle on a hydraulic jack that can be removed. The mechanism can easily be made to go over center to keep it in place and the lift only needs to be just enough to clear the swarf.

BadDog
09-16-2007, 04:07 PM
Yes, I remembered your setup and was looking at it for ideas on this project. Still not sure exactly how it can be adapted, but the thought occured that I could make the lever arms so that they had a sort of slide in hinge pin to all me to remove them when not in service. One primary objective is to not have them in the way for day to day use. I already have more than enough toe-stubbers and ankle scrapers out there. Over-center with sufficient lift would require some funky offset bracketing, but could be done. Or simply do as you did and utilize the lever arm as a locking mechanism.

john hobdeclipe
09-16-2007, 04:47 PM
Be careful about moving a top-heavy drill press. I have nearly everything in my shop mobile EXCEPT the drill press, which is bolted to the floor.

BadDog
09-16-2007, 05:05 PM
Yeah, that worries me too. But in my case, the drill press is THE most important thing to be mobile. There is really only one place where it will be out of the way and still usable. BUT, that place has other infrequent uses so that the drill press can not be a permanent fixture. So, until I either gut my shop and reorganize (on the "to do list", around page 273 line item 17 I think. Oh, no, forgot about the recent additions, it's on 305 now... :o ) or win the lottery and build a real shop, I have to find some workable solution. So part of the plan is to have a hook/push handle thingy that allows force to be applied to the frame/dolly/whatsit that I'm trying to figure out. :D Not ideal, and not something I want to do frequently, but I'm hoping to come up with a workable plan. I'm also thinking that, specifically for the drill press, it might be good to have a sort of outrigger base permanently mounted. If you look at the pic on the link, the base on that thing probably weights near 100# and is very heavy, but not very wide. Adding a few inches to each side, shouldn't increase the trip hazard too much but would help stability a lot I think, both in use and when moving.

Evan
09-16-2007, 05:42 PM
Adding a few inches to each side, shouldn't increase the trip hazard too much but would help stability a lot I think, both in use and when moving.

Absolutely. That's what I did with my Strands. It's nearly as heavy as yours and just as unstable. I bolted it to a bigger wood platform built up solid from wood scrap and covered in galvanized sheet.

http://vts.bc.ca/pics2/strandsbase.jpg

It doesn't get in the way for me at all. I could put non steering "casters" on a single axle across the front that cam down and steerable ones on the back that worked on the same principle as my bench. They wouldn't be in the way.

For the front non steerable un-casters you could just build in a tube in the base front and when needed slip in a torque tube within that which has an offset axle for a wheel on each end. Slip a tommy bar into a hole of the torque tube/axle carrier on one end and cam the off center casters to lift the front a 1/4".

ProGunOne
09-17-2007, 12:59 AM
Have you seen the mobile base plans on Guy Lautard's site? It could be easily built from steel instead of wood.

http://lautard.com/casters.html

Too_Many_Tools
09-17-2007, 01:36 AM
Have you seen the mobile base plans on Guy Lautard's site? It could be easily built from steel instead of wood.


Link?

Thanks

TMT

Too_Many_Tools
09-17-2007, 01:40 AM
Absolutely. That's what I did with my Strands. It's nearly as heavy as yours and just as unstable. I bolted it to a bigger wood platform built up solid from wood scrap and covered in galvanized sheet.

http://vts.bc.ca/pics2/strandsbase.jpg

It doesn't get in the way for me at all. I could put non steering "casters" on a single axle across the front that cam down and steerable ones on the back that worked on the same principle as my bench. They wouldn't be in the way.

For the front non steerable un-casters you could just build in a tube in the base front and when needed slip in a torque tube within that which has an offset axle for a wheel on each end. Slip a tommy bar into a hole of the torque tube/axle carrier on one end and cam the off center casters to lift the front a 1/4".


How about filling the base with sand or cement?

That way the drill and weighted base moves the overall center of gravity lower.

The way I have seen most drill presses tip over is when someone mounts a long item to the table creating a lever that tips the drill press over on its side....hopefully missing the user.

TMT

Too_Many_Tools
09-17-2007, 01:50 AM
Absolutely. That's what I did with my Strands. It's nearly as heavy as yours and just as unstable. I bolted it to a bigger wood platform built up solid from wood scrap and covered in galvanized sheet.

http://vts.bc.ca/pics2/strandsbase.jpg

It doesn't get in the way for me at all. I could put non steering "casters" on a single axle across the front that cam down and steerable ones on the back that worked on the same principle as my bench. They wouldn't be in the way.

For the front non steerable un-casters you could just build in a tube in the base front and when needed slip in a torque tube within that which has an offset axle for a wheel on each end. Slip a tommy bar into a hole of the torque tube/axle carrier on one end and cam the off center casters to lift the front a 1/4".


How about filling the base with sand or cement?

That way the drill and weighted base moves the overall center of gravity lower.

The way I have seen most drill presses tip over is when someone mounts a long item to the table creating a lever that tips the drill press over on its side....hopefully missing the user.

TMT

Evan
09-17-2007, 09:17 AM
They won't tip if they are properly bolted down. Failing that a base like the one I use makes it pretty safe. Using it with no base or bolts is asking for trouble.

BadDog
09-17-2007, 08:44 PM
I've got some big chunks of channel iron that might work well for this. 2 outriggers ("C" open down) front to rear, with cross pieces to bolt down to at the base. Easy to stand in the open front, and the "C" would allow easy attachment of dolly/wheel assy. But I would need to paint it ORANGE to help keep me from tripping over it.