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jacampb2
09-18-2007, 02:13 PM
Anyone know any common equipment that still uses steppers? I know dot matrix printers have them, they are getting somewhat difficult to find though. Any other commonly discarded things w/ them?

I am looking to build a few little CNC projects, a PCB router, and Possibly a CNC table for my hypertherm 1000. I know I can find the steppers on ebay, but it seems everyone has that idea now and they are starting to go for really good money...

Scanners? Any other type of printer? Industrial equipment? These folks on ebay are pulling them out of something. Tell me what junk to look for :D

Later,
Jason

Swarf&Sparks
09-18-2007, 02:30 PM
Sorry to hafta tell you this Jason, but speaking from experience, you have virtually no chance of using ex-printer stepper motors for CNC.

Even the old 132 column "industrial" printers used NEMA 17 and 23 motors, which aint gonna crack it.

Bite the bullet and buy new 100-150 oz/inch, minimum.

this beast started as a PCB drill/router, now a general purpose router.

Using 330 oz/in, but don't let me stop you experimenting ;)

http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b387/idgara_eng/damnmachine19.jpg

DR
09-18-2007, 03:03 PM
Anyone know any common equipment that still uses steppers?


I've gotten some in 200 oz-in range off a large printing or collating machine. I found the remains of the machine at a scrap yard.

Swarf&Sparks
09-18-2007, 03:22 PM
Sorry, my typo.
They are 230 oz/in motors

RTPBurnsville
09-18-2007, 03:34 PM
Automation Direct sells several new step motors that I have found to be very nice for not much cash.

Mcruff
09-18-2007, 04:06 PM
I just bought 2 Nema 34 (465oz) motors for my mill project from these guys. http://www.kelinginc.net/index.html
You can get brand new Nema 23 motors (260oz) output for $39 each. The ones I got have not been used yet but a friend of mine tested them and said they worked great.

lenord
09-18-2007, 05:28 PM
www.candhsales.com (http://www.candhsales.com)

www.orientalmotor.com (http://www.orientalmotor.com) new motors

http://www.mpja.com/

www.sciplus.com (http://www.sciplus.com)


FWIW
Lenord

Rustybolt
09-18-2007, 05:37 PM
Google www.kelinginc.net. I think you'll be pleasantly suprised by their prices.

lwalker
09-18-2007, 06:08 PM
I have more size 23 motors than I'm likely to use. I offered to swap a few for lathe/mini-mill tooling on another forum with no takers.

If you're interested in a swap, send me a PM. I have mostly Vexta/Oriental steppers, PH264-PH266. Some are unused, possibly still in box; some are pulled from prototype machinery. Specs can easily be found online but I think the PH266 is rated at 150oz-in holding torque.

studentjim
09-18-2007, 07:08 PM
www.dtllc.com

jacampb2
09-18-2007, 09:14 PM
Thanks for the info so far guys. My intent is to build a small PCB router first, and if all goes well w/ it to step up and build a plasma table. I was unaware the the DMP motors are so underpowered, from what I read, a lot of folks were using them for PCB routers.

Thanks,
Jason

Evan
09-18-2007, 09:23 PM
Here is a pretty good deal although the motors are a bit light. They could be used for a PCB router but attention will have to be paid to friction.



500 Step Motor + Driver$69.00 (http://www.lasermotion.com/images/optics/StepKit.gif)

http://www.lasermotion.com/stepmotor.html

Too_Many_Tools
09-19-2007, 12:12 AM
Any machine you build will have a set of minimum requirements on the motors that drive the machine.

Determine that FIRST and then get the motors that fit those requirements.

Trying to build a machine around "cheap" motors is an expensive lesson in the making.

I would recommend lurking at www.cnczone.com...it is a great place to learn the basics of CNC.

TMT

jacampb2
09-19-2007, 12:53 AM
Any machine you build will have a set of minimum requirements on the motors that drive the machine.

Determine that FIRST and then get the motors that fit those requirements.

Trying to build a machine around "cheap" motors is an expensive lesson in the making.

I would recommend lurking at www.cnczone.com...it is a great place to learn the basics of CNC.

TMT

cnczone is what put this bug in my butt to begin with :D

I was looking at PCB routers, and thinking how much nicer that would be than DIY etching, most of the little gantry routers that people have made are very simple, and seem to be yielding good results. After I found a bunch of threads about rolling your own controller, I was sold.

Then I got to thinking, if I can pull a little machine off, why not built a mid sized table for my plasma. I farm out a fair amount of work to a guy with a CNC table near me. I have the right cutter for it, even have a machine torch that I got for damn near free from my local airgas when I bought it. It would really be a boon to my fabrication business. I hate plasma cutting by hand. Of course I will have to build a water table for it as well... Too many projects, and not enough time...

Thanks,
Jason

Too_Many_Tools
09-19-2007, 01:21 AM
cnczone is what put this bug in my butt to begin with :D

I was looking at PCB routers, and thinking how much nicer that would be than DIY etching, most of the little gantry routers that people have made are very simple, and seem to be yielding good results. After I found a bunch of threads about rolling your own controller, I was sold.

Then I got to thinking, if I can pull a little machine off, why not built a mid sized table for my plasma. I farm out a fair amount of work to a guy with a CNC table near me. I have the right cutter for it, even have a machine torch that I got for damn near free from my local airgas when I bought it. It would really be a boon to my fabrication business. I hate plasma cutting by hand. Of course I will have to build a water table for it as well... Too many projects, and not enough time...

Thanks,
Jason

Good....then you know the site and its resources.

I have worked with CNC for decades and in our business have bought dozens if not hundreds of machine centers. With all that experience, I still note that one really needs to build a hobby CNC project from scratch to really learn all the ins and outs of the technology.

I would take some time and read all the posts over at Cnczone.com and note what works and what does not. You will note that many machines tend to end up underpowered...buiilders always want to add more to the machine. That is reason enough for me to say that anything you build should have the next size of stepper or servo that you think you need.

TMT

lazlo
09-19-2007, 01:46 AM
Google www.kelinginc.net. I think you'll be pleasantly suprised by their prices.

Kelig looks like they sell the same Chinese stepper motors from Automation Direct. I've heard the Chinese steppers are surprisingly good for Home/Hobby CNC.
I have no idea how well they hold up in a production environment, but that's probably not an issue for you.

If you're patient, MPJA has some great deals on steppers. I bought several of these 215 Oz/in Minbea/Matsu****a (Japanese) hybrid steppers from MPJA for $9.95 each:

http://www.mpja.com/prodinfo.asp?number=16320+MS

They sold out really quickly, but MPJA gets steppers in all the time.

Edit: funny -- the forum software won't let me type "Matsu****a" :)