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gunsmith
11-02-2007, 06:31 PM
I was lucky enough to salvage an old drill press. It is a Canadian Forge Model 124. I'm going to rebuild it and use it for larger slow speed drilling in steel and wood. 6" holes and the such should be no problem.

When I dismantled it, I found one of the shafts had a brass plating on it. At first I thought it was an imbeded sleave. This is not the case. I believe it is a brass plating that was machined down to fit the bore the shaft rides in.

What I would like to know is how this process is done. I suspect it is not brazing but rather a crude plating that is then machined to fit the bore. Is it possible to brass plate by heating the shaft and melting brass onto the shaft, similar to how you tin copper pipe? If so, what would I use for a flux? Any thoughts? It would be nice to see this unit running again.

PTSideshow
11-02-2007, 06:56 PM
Plating is not what it was as it would take forever to get it thick enough to machine.By the vacuum deposition process or the electro coating. It could have been a collar heated and shrunk fit tight on the shaft. Or it could have been cast, but more likely it was brazed on which I believe would be the easiest and fastest way to do a repair. :)

oldtiffie
11-02-2007, 08:45 PM
Depending on how much localised heat you can tolerate, it should be possible to use a brass/bronze/copper-alloy/monel filler rod with MIG/TIG, but it will need an expereinced had to get it right.

Fasttrack
11-03-2007, 12:01 AM
couldn't you just make a brass insert for the bore and turn the old brass off? If you had lots of money/brass lying around anyway ...

PTSideshow
11-03-2007, 05:28 AM
Even with vacuum deposition a brass collar around the shaft the problems would be building a thickness enough to machine. And the problems with just coating a specific section of shaft.
If the part was placed in a fixture like a pipe rolling yokes for welding pipe and then brazed the length and turned till the whole shaft was covered.
While looking for the section on this web site. I came across something that will answer your question on how it was done. Go down past the chart and in the next paragraph they have a couple of drawings ect.
http://www.lucasmilhaupt.com/htmdocs/brazing_support/everything_about_brazing/6_basic_steps_braze.html

Swarf&Sparks
11-03-2007, 11:10 AM
I must be missiing something here.
How can you "brass plate"?
Brass is an alloy. In my limited experience with electroplating, it's limited to elemental metals.

Seastar
11-03-2007, 11:49 AM
Find a boat/yacht repair facility.
Brasing on worn propeller and rudder shafts and then machining them to original dimensions is common in that industry.
It may be that your shaft was repaired that way some time in the past.
Here in Fort Lauderdale there are several companies that do that sort of work.
Bill

PTSideshow
11-03-2007, 02:54 PM
I must be missiing something here.
How can you "brass plate"?
Brass is an alloy. In my limited experience with electroplating, it's limited to elemental metals.
My bad, 5:30am when I typed it is either vacuum deposition or a electro coating process as we have a lot of steel with a coating of brass on it for light fixtures see pictures. both are steel the old one and the new one.http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d200/ptsideshow/DSCF9902.jpg
Is the new one.
http://i35.photobucket.com/albums/d200/ptsideshow/DSCF9901.jpg
Is the old one on the way to the shredder.
:D

Todd Tolhurst
11-03-2007, 05:27 PM
Brass is an alloy. In my limited experience with electroplating, it's limited to elemental metals.

Caswell will be happy to sell you a brass plating kit (http://www.caswellplating.com/kits/brass.htm).

gunsmith
11-05-2007, 06:08 PM
Thanks PTS . That was it ---------- I think. It was definitly a
plating of some sort. When I said "plating", maybe I should have said tinning.
It would have probably have been closer to what was actualy done.