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View Full Version : Interesting product here for the machinist



Your Old Dog
11-09-2007, 07:20 AM
I noticed this in the advertisment block at the top of the thread list this morning. This stuff would be a great way to workup prototypes. The prices on this particular page don't look all that expensive to me either. We have a place called Buffalo Metal Castings near me and I've always wanted to have some castings of my own made. This wax could be the ticket.

http://www.machinablewax.com/using_machinable_wax.htm

Fasttrack
11-09-2007, 12:16 PM
Yeah they use that stuff by the ton around here for setting up CNC machines or for teaching students how to run machines. Guess they feel its safer and more economical to learn on something fairly soft and inexpensive ... i can't imagine why that would be. Its just a couple hundred college guys all eager to start pushing buttons and turning knobs :D

Swarf&Sparks
11-09-2007, 02:06 PM
Sh1t!
I can buy 60xx ali cheaper than that!
And I just use paraffin wax for lost wax moulds (non investment)

Evan
11-09-2007, 02:25 PM
Volumetric Shrinkage at room temp: 7%

Excuse me, but what is that supposed to mean? Shrinkage from what? At any rate that's a lot of shrink. It better be at least linear and predictable or the stuff is only good for practicing finding the E-stop.

If you are using paraffin wax you can harden it up a great deal by adding stearic acid. It's available at any place that carries candle making supplies. It's used to make candles burn clean and dripless. BTW, it's only technically an acid, it's really a long chain fatty acid found in lard.

topct
11-09-2007, 04:00 PM
It's a "machinable" wax not a casting wax. The shrinkage would be after it cools from remelting.

Stepside
11-09-2007, 05:36 PM
The machinable wax I have used has a great shrink rate. It shrinks about .375 per foot from molten to room temperature. It melts in a crock pot so you can reuse the chips and the trial parts. It is strong enough that you can drill and tap the parts and actually build either a part or a fixture or both. If doing lost wax I would use wax designed for that purpose.

I did a bunch of wax to silicone to urethane parts using the blue wax. It was accurate enough that the 1/4-20 threads were usable.

While it seems expensive, it is reusable where the aluminum is recycled rather than remelted. Another big savings is the price of the cutters that you do not break, as well as the fact that you can really up the cutting speed.

I never let my students melt the wax because the 315 degree melting temperature was a bit dangerous. So I did it myself using a crock pot. If you use the low setting it takes a school day to melt especially if it was mainly chips.

PTSideshow
11-09-2007, 09:55 PM
Here you go the supplier of waxes and other stuff. The have a great bit of info on pattern making stuff and casting.
they supply the jewelry casting and carving waxes to a number of rebranded boxes.
http://www.freemansupply.com/index.htm
They also have a hobbyist site with video's
http://www.hobbycast.net/video.htm
:D

dp
11-09-2007, 11:40 PM
Excuse me, but what is that supposed to mean? Shrinkage from what? At any rate that's a lot of shrink. It better be at least linear and predictable or the stuff is only good for practicing finding the E-stop.

If you are using paraffin wax you can harden it up a great deal by adding stearic acid. It's available at any place that carries candle making supplies. It's used to make candles burn clean and dripless. BTW, it's only technically an acid, it's really a long chain fatty acid found in lard.

And you can get it in colors other than blue.

KiddZimaHater
11-09-2007, 11:44 PM
Yellow Pine 4 X 4's at Home Depot are cheaper than that !!!

Your Old Dog
11-10-2007, 08:35 AM
PTSideshow thanks for the links. I found several of the videos very interesting. Also noticed in one of the wax machining videos that they had velcro on the quill housing. What a simple way to mount a chip shield, also, if anything screws up it just tears off!

One of the things that attracted me to the machining with this wax was the ability to make repairs but the video says just the opposite, that it's very difficult to repair. If I can't touch it up with heat and melting more was on it then it wouldn't be much use for me.

John Stevenson
11-10-2007, 12:02 PM
YOD,
Thanks for that it reminded me of this product and I have done a search and found a supplier in the UK.

This will be handy for us at the shows as we can cut this easier on the demo machines and reuse it afterwards.
So far I have wasted 6 alloy blanks trying to work a macro code out to CNC bevel gears using just a cheap home ground straight sided Vee tool.

Using this I will be able to cast it into a mould the correct blank shape for the wheel.

So far I'm not having much luck and at the rate I'm going I reckon I may get a blank that resembles a bevel gear around blank number 136 :mad:

.

.

Your Old Dog
11-10-2007, 02:06 PM
Glad I could help John. I thought with all the varied personalities/occupations on this board that someone might have a use for it. One nice about it for your applcation is that the CNC will be running fast enough that a customer won't have to wait all day to see something really tricky. Otherwise, it'd be like watching grass grow, the kind you walk on, not the kind they smoke !!

Wirecutter
11-10-2007, 02:35 PM
Yellow Pine 4 X 4's at Home Depot are cheaper than that !!!

Yeah, but remelting and reusing sawdust and wood is a little problematic. Sorry, I just had to say it... :D

-Mark

John Stevenson
11-16-2007, 06:13 PM
Well I followed up on that machinable wax with a company called Trycut in the UK.
Spoke to a very knowledgeable guy and he gave me details and prices on Wednesday night.
I ordered 2 Kg of 'cast' on Wednesday night by email and it was delivered this morning.
2Kg is roughly 4 pounds in weight and this is what it loks like to give an idea of size/ bulk.

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/stevenson.engineers/lsteve/files/wax.jpg

10" long x 4" x3" roughly so you get a fair wedge to stsrt with.

.

aboard_epsilon
11-16-2007, 06:49 PM
you got this stuff too

just so happens a guy from prestatyn is the main distributer ..(never met him honest)

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/100g-Polymorph-Thermoplastic-repair-compound-putty_W0QQitemZ120184212949QQihZ002QQcategoryZ3405 6QQrdZ1QQssPageNameZWD4VQQcmdZViewItem

all ther best.markj

japcas
11-16-2007, 07:48 PM
We use this stuff at work sometimes when working out the programming for complicated 3D die shapes before actually cutting on the metal itself. It may seem expensive but it costs peanuts compared to a lot of steel and stainless alloys. Also, if there is a mistake in the program it's a lot more forgiving than cutting metal. Especially, when running custom ordered cutters.