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dp
11-22-2007, 02:34 AM
First I've seen: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TpTZyx5Whig

Short but informative. It would be interesting to see more vids of operations on machines that were once common place.

IOWOLF
11-22-2007, 10:12 AM
Bring your Video Camera and come to my shop, watch me work every day. :)

Your Old Dog
11-22-2007, 10:20 AM
Thanks for the damn post. You just drove up the price of die filers on ebay for me. I been looking for one :D

alsinaj
11-22-2007, 01:16 PM
Thanks for posting the video. My die filer runs much faster than that - about 600 rpm, I would say - and vibrates so much it is useless. Is it just running too fast? Does anyone know what the correct range of speeds is?

My unit is a Keller 1A with a 1/4 hp 1725 rpm motor (non-original). The driven pulley is original and just fits inside the belt guard. The driving pulley can't be made much smaller. The ratio is about 3:1. The unit in the video seems to be running about 150 rpm. To get that speed, I would need a motor running at about 750 rpm - not a common item. Suggestions?

My unit is also missing its overarm. Anyone know where I could get sufficient information to build one?

Thanks.

crrmeyer
11-22-2007, 01:41 PM
Thanks for the damn post. You just drove up the price of die filers on ebay for me. I been looking for one :D

I like that he put the video up - but I might be a little biased in that I am probably going to put my completely redone but now spare die filer up on ebay :).

Charles

http://members.cox.net/crmeyer/keller1.jpg

japcas
11-22-2007, 02:23 PM
Thanks for posting the video. My die filer runs much faster than that - about 600 rpm, I would say - and vibrates so much it is useless. Is it just running too fast? Does anyone know what the correct range of speeds is?

My unit is a Keller 1A with a 1/4 hp 1725 rpm motor (non-original). The driven pulley is original and just fits inside the belt guard. The driving pulley can't be made much smaller. The ratio is about 3:1. The unit in the video seems to be running about 150 rpm. To get that speed, I would need a motor running at about 750 rpm - not a common item. Suggestions?

My unit is also missing its overarm. Anyone know where I could get sufficient information to build one?

Thanks.

600 stokes per minute does sound a bit fast. One cheap and easy solution to slow it down would be to put a dc treadmill type motor on it for variable speed. You could use your pulley dimensions and slow the motor down until you get a spm that you are satisfied with. Hope this helps.

crrmeyer
11-22-2007, 03:49 PM
Thanks for posting the video. My die filer runs much faster than that - about 600 rpm, I would say - and vibrates so much it is useless. Is it just running too fast? Does anyone know what the correct range of speeds is?

My unit is a Keller 1A with a 1/4 hp 1725 rpm motor (non-original). The driven pulley is original and just fits inside the belt guard. The driving pulley can't be made much smaller. The ratio is about 3:1. The unit in the video seems to be running about 150 rpm. To get that speed, I would need a motor running at about 750 rpm - not a common item. Suggestions?

Thanks.

Who about this two speed motor on ebay for cheap?

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=130175142017

Not quite 800 RPM but definitely slower. Charles

wierdscience
11-22-2007, 04:21 PM
Thanks for reminding me that I have a homebuilt that I never finished.

Even worse is the memory of the floor model die filer I missed on ebay because my ISP took a dump 20 minutes before it ended:D




On the bright side I did find this niffty corprate PR video:D
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3wy8i8EXuPM&feature=related

JRouche
11-22-2007, 04:42 PM
Dang Wierd... That Pakistani narrating the video is the same guy who answers the phone at my credit card company customer service line.. LOL JRouche

Mcgyver
11-22-2007, 04:55 PM
this must be one of those tools that you can only appreciate once you've had one?? as I've yet to file a die, i just don't get it. I use files all the time, to remove machining marks, clean up a weld, get something flat, on rougher fabrications to clean up an edge after sawing or even torching - non of which a die filer would be much help with. I can see it for squaring up an internal corner, but for the infrequency of that doing it by hand seems ok

so what am i missing? and where the heck do you buy the die files - no taper, straight tang and teeth cut toward the tang...can't remember ever seeing them in a catalogue.

quasi
11-22-2007, 07:14 PM
Keller still makes Die filers and sells the overarms seperatly. Mine came without them as well. They ain't cheap!

J. Randall
11-22-2007, 08:39 PM
removed since Mcgyver edited his post.

Your Old Dog
11-22-2007, 09:40 PM
I like that he put the video up - but I might be a little biased in that I am probably going to put my completely redone but now spare die filer up on ebay :).

Charles

http://members.cox.net/crmeyer/keller1.jpg

You putting it up before or after Christmas? You'd likely do better after the holidays. (I know I could afford it better then!)