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View Full Version : Adding an engine oil cooler?



wierdscience
11-22-2007, 02:13 PM
I'm building the engine in my old Ranger,2.9l v-6,I want to add an oil cooler because the little engine cooks oil,oil cooled pistons,hot weather etc.

I am assuming since "extreme cold" and South Mississippi don't get used together that I don't need the "thermostaticlly controlled bypass valve" adapter right?

My other question is who makes the best oil line assemblies?Gates,Kelly,Dayco or????

jacampb2
11-22-2007, 02:47 PM
I went to a local hydraulic shop and had hoses made for my oil cooler. I got a low pressure, high temp resistant, oil/solvent resistant hose I believe by gates, however it could be parker hanafin(sp?). The hose hasn't let me down yet, it is very flexible, but still heavy enough to have AN-8 crimp on fittings put on it.

I wouldn't waste money on any thermostat setup. The factory external oil coolers never had such a thing. Frankly, I think it is a blatant attempt to con people out of there money. I have seen the same question about trans oil coolers. The oil is cold in a cold climate, w/ or w/o an oil cooler. If you allow the recommended 1-2 minute warm up time before driving away, the cooler wont be doing a whole lot of extra cooling. If I am not mistaken, an air/liquid heat exchanger can never cool the liquid bellow ambient temp, even when fan cooled.

Joel
11-22-2007, 02:49 PM
In your climate I can't imagine any need for a thermostat.
When I put a oil temp gauge on my 69 Z-28, I was surprised at how long it took for the oil to come up to temperature and how fast it cooled back down. Since the heat is the big problem and cold weather is infrequent, you should be fine anyway.
As for hoses, how about having them made up by whoever does the hydraulic hoses for your shop?

A.K. Boomer
11-22-2007, 03:05 PM
Gates,Kelly,Dayco or????


All good names, I know when I throw a timing belt on an engine its usually one of the ones you just mentioned or a goodyear,

You can also keep your cooler in an out of direct airflow place and run a little themostatically controlled fan -- it sounds as if your trying to stay away from complexity though and get by with the least -- one thing about it is its not relient on vehicle movement for cooling so if your four wheeling in the steeps its a thought -- it can also enable a smaller cooler because you can blast air through it, and it automatically takes care of the overcooling by not having it in the open, Cons of course are having to power a little fan and in some cases even going down the highway pulling a load or something - not good for a total cruiser.

wierdscience
11-22-2007, 03:52 PM
I didn't think I needed the thermostat bypass,but it does on occasion get down to 10*f or less.I've never been one to let an engine warm up unless it's cold natured and carbed.Usually I just crank it up soon as it shows oil pressure off we go.

Joel,ya I was thinking that,but regular hydraulic hose doesn't hold up too well to motor oil,something about the acidic nature of burnt oil.The stuff I have seen in a couple of SBC cooler kts is Dayco branded as "oil hose" looks to be a single wire hose with a grey poly jacket.

AK you bring up a good point,placement.I have plenty of room infront of the ac coil and the truck runs a clutch fan so that's probibly where I will put it mounted a few inches ahead of the ac coil.I got a small hydraulic single pass cooler I want to use that's about twice the surface area as the coolers most commonly seen in the kits.That's why I want to just get the adapter and do my own hoses and cooler.

barts
11-22-2007, 03:53 PM
One of the approaches that diesel engine manufacturers take on controlling oil temperature is to fit oil-water heat exchangers. This helps the oil come to operating temperature more quickly (helping to reduce condensation issues) and provides ample already thermostatically controlled cooling, and when designed in, eliminates the need for hoses, etc, additional space in front of
the radiator, etc.

You can add such; you can probably route the water that goes to the heater bypass valve first through such an oil/water heat exchanger, either purchased
or fabricated.

Looking around, it appears aftermarket/competition parts are also available on the web...

- Bart

wierdscience
11-22-2007, 04:07 PM
Bart,it gets silly hot here in the summer and coolant based systems don't work too well.They work fine moving,but as an example coming off the interstate to a stoplight usually boils the radiator over.My boss added a deeper sump and an in tank radiator cooler to the shops 1ton,on a 90f day it boils over at a stoplight so he ended up not using it and installing an air over anyway.

This little truck in the summer might be seeing 300f+ for oil temps.

The thing is built similar to a diesel in that there is an oil jet drilled into each conrod that sprays the backside of the piston face.It was nice and clean inside so far as sludge,but burnt laquer covered everything not sliding or spinning.

Dawai
11-22-2007, 04:39 PM
Radiator and a cooler?

Towing, better have one.. big load better have one with a fan.

I love my lil 94 Mazda, cough... Ford.. Wonderful American name on that lil assembled in America with foreign parts truck.
Rascal will still burn em off.. 146k last I looked. Mine has a 4.0/5 speed, not been in the motor yet. Figured when a rod comes out, it's time for a 5.0.
OHH yeah, you still don't like lowriders.. but Darin, this one will sling your drink out of the holder and out the window. It's got a nice stereo, but it don go bump bump..

micrometer50
11-22-2007, 05:32 PM
Why don't you put on the oil cooler and watch the oil temp. If the oil is to cold and the engine is slow warming up, add the thermostat.

wierdscience
11-22-2007, 05:56 PM
Radiator and a cooler?

Towing, better have one.. big load better have one with a fan.

I love my lil 94 Mazda, cough... Ford.. Wonderful American name on that lil assembled in America with foreign parts truck.
Rascal will still burn em off.. 146k last I looked. Mine has a 4.0/5 speed, not been in the motor yet. Figured when a rod comes out, it's time for a 5.0.
OHH yeah, you still don't like lowriders.. but Darin, this one will sling your drink out of the holder and out the window. It's got a nice stereo, but it don go bump bump..

Pop has a 94' with the 4.0 in it,it's got more power,but drinks more juice,still get 26-28 out of it though.The lilttle 2.9 everybody swears at has over 500k on it with nothing more than a TFI module and a water pump.Rebuild is happening because one of the freeze plugs rotted out and I didn't have room to work it in the frame.
Cylinders have a little ridge in them,but I am boring anyway,may as well do it once.

Evan
11-22-2007, 10:06 PM
I put an engine oil cooler on my '88 Ranger with 2.9 liter V6 not long after we bought it new. I made the radiator using 3/4" copper tubing and elbows at the ends and used copper sheet to make fins that were soldered on. I made a bypass valve to short circuit the cooler in the winter because at 40 below the oil will gel in the radiator and starve the engine. You won't need that. I used neoprene fabric reinforced hoses and regular nipples and hose clamps and bought an adapter the fits between the oil filter and the filter mount that redirects the oil out and back in. It has a pressure relief valve that allows some oil to bypass the radiator loop so that if it is blocked the engine gets some oil.

I built it because we were hauling a camper on back and then later a fifth wheel trailer. I put an oil temp gauge on the bypass valve body so I could see what the effect was. Previous to installing the cooler the oil would run smoking hot at around 350 when hauling a load. After the cooler the oil would run just a little hotter than the engine coolant loop and never went above it by much. More important, it also dropped the temperature of the engine coolant so there was never any chance of overheating no matter what the temp or load. I used that truck to pull the 3000 lb fifth wheel through the central valley in California one summer when it was 110 in the shade. Not one bit of trouble with overheating but it did turn the wheel bearings blue.

I mounted the oil rad in front of the regular rad right in the center. It won't raise the temperature of the engine coolant at all because the air going through is such a high volume it doesn't get much warmer than ambient as it picks up heat.

I have never had any problems with it, no leaks or other trouble and it has been on there for over 15 years. I highly recommend some sort of engine oil cooler for any truck that is trailering. It is the most effective way to lower operating temperatures.

deltaenterprizes
11-22-2007, 10:56 PM
The oil cooler on my 86 GMC used steel lines like the transmission lines and the radiator also had a tank for it to circulate.

Dawai
11-23-2007, 08:00 PM
You probably know all this.. but..

Push the pistons with a feeler guage.. You'd be surprised and some of the slop the machine shops are shooting out the door. Do it right, then turn the piston 90 degrees and do it again. Make sure they didn't egg it.

I gap the rings, and mic the crank, even thou it has been done for me.
When I leave a block to be bored, I have them fit the pistons and number them. Sometimes there is no difference, other times.. well.. I don't take anybodies word on it. Ain't much you can do except go somewhere else next time.

take your lil brass hammer "you make a morse taper turn loose with", rap the bolts lightly.. THEN retorque them. You'll be surprised to see some go a half round, They were galled threads. Mains.. well.. I don't stake them, but others I know do. I had a crank locking down every time I'd put a main cap on it.. the previous builder had staked the main.. two strokes with a file and it was cleaned up.

I love the lil ford trucks. Mine has been beaten with a stick and never complained. I can remember getting on the on ramp to the interstate, all 4 tires smoking.. a hitchhiker jumping the guard rail. I was depressed and feeling like crap from the thyroid. Look out world, another maniac.

I brought home another building today with the ranger. Roofing and Twelve foot 2x4's in camper shell, about two tons of osb on bike trailer with another half ton 2x4's on top. NOW that lowrider really was low.. tires about flat. I didn't get over 45.

wierdscience
11-23-2007, 11:10 PM
Ya,David,been there got the screwed up parts to prove it.Worst was a diesel crank I sent out that spun a rod bearing.It needed a buildup and grind after magnaflux.I went to pick it up and noticed that throw now had no oil hole.They didn't slug the hole before they welded it up,amateurs.

The guys I use I trust,they are older like me and I tell them to do my work themselves and let the pothead kids sweep the floor.

Still and all I always do my own assembly work,nothing like a set of pistons in backwards or a second hand oil pump to ruin a day.

I am lucky,I have one shop that does excellent head work and another that grinds cranks inhouse.Got my crank turned 10/10 and polished for $85,perfect job,I am happy.

wierdscience
11-23-2007, 11:14 PM
I put an engine oil cooler on my '88 Ranger with 2.9 liter V6 not long after we bought it new. I made the radiator using 3/4" copper tubing and elbows at the ends and used copper sheet to make fins that were soldered on. I made a bypass valve to short circuit the cooler in the winter because at 40 below the oil will gel in the radiator and starve the engine. You won't need that. I used neoprene fabric reinforced hoses and regular nipples and hose clamps and bought an adapter the fits between the oil filter and the filter mount that redirects the oil out and back in. It has a pressure relief valve that allows some oil to bypass the radiator loop so that if it is blocked the engine gets some oil.

I built it because we were hauling a camper on back and then later a fifth wheel trailer. I put an oil temp gauge on the bypass valve body so I could see what the effect was. Previous to installing the cooler the oil would run smoking hot at around 350 when hauling a load. After the cooler the oil would run just a little hotter than the engine coolant loop and never went above it by much. More important, it also dropped the temperature of the engine coolant so there was never any chance of overheating no matter what the temp or load. I used that truck to pull the 3000 lb fifth wheel through the central valley in California one summer when it was 110 in the shade. Not one bit of trouble with overheating but it did turn the wheel bearings blue.

I mounted the oil rad in front of the regular rad right in the center. It won't raise the temperature of the engine coolant at all because the air going through is such a high volume it doesn't get much warmer than ambient as it picks up heat.

I have never had any problems with it, no leaks or other trouble and it has been on there for over 15 years. I highly recommend some sort of engine oil cooler for any truck that is trailering. It is the most effective way to lower operating temperatures.

Evan,did the adapter you used sandwhich between the oil filter and the factory right angle adapter or did it replace the factory adapter?

Evan
11-23-2007, 11:26 PM
It sandwiches between the two and is about an inch thick with hose fittings on the side. It came with an assortment of extenders for different vehicle models that hold the unit on by screwing it to the filter mount and provide extended threads to screw the filter to which then acts the same as the original filter mount .

wierdscience
11-23-2007, 11:43 PM
Ah,that answers that,before I was studying relocating the filter so I could ditch the factory adapter.

torker
11-23-2007, 11:48 PM
David...your warning is a good one. There's an engine rebuilder here...he has beautifull equipment. His shop just gleams. All his tools...everything are perfectly arranged. This is because he's got a bad rep from many screw ups. He just isn't that busy so he has tons of time to clean.
His worse screw up to date...a local egine builder who specializes in old BB Fords, got him to polish a rare forged crank for a 428. The genius decided that it should be .010 under...ooops screwed up then to .020...ooops....the builder got the crank back at .030 under. He and his customer where just wild! The customer spent years trying to find a virgin forged steel crank for a 428...the guy screwed it up in a couple hours (or less).
Russ

wierdscience
11-24-2007, 01:14 AM
Russ,horror stories,luckily only a couple happened to me-

236 IH pickup engine,inline six,needed #5&6 sleeved,came back and assembled,turned over free,but bound tight in spots 180*out.#6 sleeve was bored in and installed 5* off vertical,piston bound near bottom of cylinder so bad it flexed the rod.Not enough to rebore and double sleeve,block was ruined.

AD153 Perkins diesel,head needed new valve seats.These seats are standard from the factory,to replace you weld a thin bead in the old seal land and shrink them out,then freeze the new seats and press them in.Idiots bored them out,oversized offcenter and then glued them in with loctite.They fell out and broke at first run from the heat,ruining three new pistons,liners and rods.$950 down the toilet.

VW low angle V-6 head,shop pocketed the valves so deep on a re-seat the valve tappet screws would not let out far enough for the valves to close.$1850 for a new head.

One set of very rare SBC heads needed new hard seats,idiots bored them in to deep and hit water......on all intake valves:mad:

Rebuilt 454 BB truck engine,bought for $2100,20,000 miles piston slap,low oil pressure.Tore it down,mismatch ground rods and mains 2std,4@.020 and 3@ .030.....most shocking,cylinders bored .020 and get this.........used pistons with.....I still get mad......knurled skirts!:eek::mad:That s--- went out in the 40's after the war ended and before eliptic ground pistons,WTF!

Local rip-off rebuilder does knurled valve guides on his cheaper models and oversized Chinese $2 valves on his"premium" rebuilds.Chicken tracks on the rod journals,mis-matched,rods,pistons,maincaps.How,oh how no one has shot him I don't know.

Oh,BTW,the low OP on the 454,instead of the normal 7 lobe pump he used a 5 lobe from a SBC,nice huh?