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MR.0001"
12-01-2007, 07:35 PM
I'm a machinist in Alberta,Canada I was kind of wondering wages of machinists in other regions in Alberta our province is booming so much that wages vary from $28-$35/hr

mark61
12-01-2007, 07:52 PM
Is that for your own shop or working for someone else? What type of machinist? Repair, production or research and developement? Do you get benifits such as paid vacation, health care , retirement profit sharing, ect?

mark61

MR.0001"
12-01-2007, 08:04 PM
Is that for your own shop or working for someone else? What type of machinist? Repair, production or research and developement? Do you get benifits such as paid vacation, health care , retirement profit sharing, ect?

mark61 f**k where do you live all i get all those benifits plus $32 an hour for a wage.. repair, or R&D im talking average wages for an employee and its rare to see an all around do everything good machinists in production unless the're programmers or supervisors

speedsport
12-01-2007, 08:53 PM
Come to Oklahoma, tops if you can do and run everything, $14.00 usd.

Doc Nickel
12-01-2007, 09:34 PM
I was 'offered' a job In New Jersey to be part R&D machinist and part inventor for $12 an hour. When I balked a bit, they suggested they might go as high as $17/hr. Benefits were just adequate, no profit sharing.

Doc.

rgbai
12-01-2007, 09:36 PM
$28-$35.00 hr doesn't seem like a whole lot of money for a machinist in Alberta my brothers driving a truck in northern Alberta for $58.00 an hour and that,s a company truck with no expenses of his own. I'm going up to join him in a couple of months.

lane
12-01-2007, 10:33 PM
Way down here it is between $16.00 and $20.00 per hour $32,000 - $38,000 per year.

torker
12-01-2007, 10:39 PM
.0001, come out to Cranbrook...the biggest non union shop here pays their best machinist $25 hr. The rest get about $22. I hope you aren't complaining :D

sch
12-01-2007, 11:01 PM
The other shoe with the high paying Alberta jobs, is that there is no
place to stay. Hotels are full, rentals all long since rented, sometimes
2-3x rented ('hot bunked') because the surge in employment has vastly
outstripped the facilities. This is in the boom areas of oil sand production
and mining areas. Other living expenses can be formidable also.

dp
12-01-2007, 11:12 PM
It's amazing what a difference is in compensation for skilled employees. There's young people in my industry (Computer data centers) that get $40.00+/hour and have no degree, less than 5 years experience, and little training - certainly nowhere near what a journeyman machinist has acquired. There's something that's just wrong about that. It's a bubble just waiting to burst, too.

rkepler
12-01-2007, 11:40 PM
It's amazing what a difference is in compensation for skilled employees. There's young people in my industry (Computer data centers) that get $40.00+/hour and have no degree, less than 5 years experience, and little training - certainly nowhere near what a journeyman machinist has acquired. There's something that's just wrong about that. It's a bubble just waiting to burst, too.

I'm pretty sure that the data processing bubble popped some time ago (remember the .dom bust?). Projections are that more and more folks are going to be needed in data processing as more folks retire and fewer are coming out of college (the crowd coming out now were brave enough to start college in a field that had just suffered massive layoffs). The job listings in my field have quintupled in the last 4 years and I expect there to be more in the next 10 years.

But computer work tends to reward the talented more than a lot of other fields - someone really talented can be worth 4x as much as some random Joe, and often they pay reflects that.

dp
12-01-2007, 11:51 PM
I think when the "Lights Out" data center finally matures and all those touch labor jobs go away the need for systems administrators will wane. First through 3rd level responders will all work in the NOC and that NOC will be in New Delhi or Singapore. The vendors will deal with the rest. But I've been doing it for nearly 30 years without letup so only time will tell, but this line of work seems to be headed towards the commodity arena like a lot of manufacturing jobs have done prior.

tony ennis
12-02-2007, 12:37 AM
I recommended to my 17 year old son that he not follow in my footsteps as a computer programmer. Before long we'll all have to compete with a sub-continent of programmers that work for nothing.

dp
12-02-2007, 12:45 AM
My first inclination when I was young was to be a rock god on guitar. In 1963 that meant a Duane Eddie or Dick Dale wannabe. Unfortunately leather pants make my ass look big. I have my mother's thighs, you know. Second choice was electronics and so I became an EE. That got boring quick so I went into field engineering, did a lot of traveling, had fun, but no roots. Settled down, got roots, migrated to computers - never end user computers (pc's), and here I am, 30 years later, still wishing I was a rock god on guitar.

Rustybolt
12-02-2007, 09:32 AM
Around here CNC operators are making 10$- 15$ an hour. To set up and program, not much more. I was hired as a machinist, but now also fabricate, weld, design, and do CAD drafting. The boss thinks I'm overpaid.

Willy
12-02-2007, 09:40 AM
Around here CNC operators are making 10$- 15$ an hour. To set up and program, not much more. I was hired as a machinist, but now also fabricate, weld, design, and do CAD drafting. The boss thinks I'm overpaid.

If he thinks you are over paid, let him find a $10/hr machinist...he'll soon find out how expensive they are!

Evan
12-02-2007, 10:01 AM
Wages in Alberta are not typical of Canada. Even MacDonald's is paying $10 per hour for part time. Keep in mind that now the Cdn dollar and the US dollar are at par value. My son has a drywall business in Calgary and the only limit on the amount of money he can make is finding employees that can work. Accommodation is non-existent and way overpriced. It's a classic boom scenario and it won't last forever but it may last quite a long time.

Shuswap Pat
12-02-2007, 11:18 AM
Wages VS Lifestlye. I opted for lifestyle. I worked in Northern BC for 6 years, making good money, and started a family. All was good, untill the bottom fell out of the forest industry. I then spent 20years in the Okanagan of BC, raising my familly, and it was great. There was a certain amount of 'Sunshine Tax', so wages were not 'Top', but lifesyle was great. If you like the outdoors - fish, hunt, ski, bike, play all in our backyard, and not figting crowds. A trafic jam is 3 cars at a stop sign!!
Money is not everything.

Evan
12-02-2007, 11:42 AM
I was offered a transfer to Vancouver with Xerox in the early 80s. It would have been a very considerable raise in pay and opened the career path to much greater opportunity as a digital systems analyst. We went house shopping and discovered that the best we could afford was a small town house that would max out our credit and payment even with a raise.

I made a final decision then to stay here and have never regretted it.

As a side note the average salary across the corporation in Microsoft exceeds 200K per year.

dp
12-02-2007, 01:31 PM
As a side note the average salary across the corporation in Microsoft exceeds 200K per year.

The average employee doesn't make near that, though. In fact I don't know any Microsofties that make half that, but that's the fun of averages.

IOWOLF
12-02-2007, 01:41 PM
Omaha area,$10 to $18, at Vickers Top pay was $22 They shut down and so did the average pay of the area.

Maintenance Pays best around here (Industrial not apartment) but they want you to be certified in HVAC and welding and part time machinist.
Most ads say as High as 18.00 D.O.E. in other words proficient in all the above, most are not, in they're eyes so they offer $10 to $12.

and Bennies, are as varied as the pay.

Edit to add a newspaper article a while back said Omaha Standard In Council Bluffs Ia. the average person made $20 per hour, Top pay was $13.28 and we were all wondering who the hell made $20, they Include Bennies and FREE PARKING, MGMT said. What a friggin Joke.

Paul Alciatore
12-02-2007, 01:43 PM
My shop is for producing my products, not hourly work. When they come to me with a job it's an interruption and I have precious little time as it is. So I quote $75 an hour. Strangely enough, I do get work that way. Go figure. I may have to raise my rates.

For good friends I do small, quick jobs for the cost of materials. But GOOD friends only and nothing commercial. If they are going to make money on it, so will I.

J.Ramsey
12-02-2007, 01:54 PM
[QUOTE
Money is not everything.[/QUOTE]

But it sure makes misery more enjoyable.

speedsport
12-02-2007, 02:04 PM
but its a long way ahead of whatever is in second place.

lane
12-02-2007, 07:23 PM
Well it all boils down to . It is not what you make ,it`s what you do with it.

Evan
12-02-2007, 10:03 PM
Money isn't everything...

But it sure keeps you in touch with the kids.

DR
12-02-2007, 10:44 PM
Money isn't everything...



Anybody else notice it's usually those without money who say that...?

dp
12-02-2007, 11:22 PM
Money isn't everything...

But it sure keeps you in touch with the kids.

And ex-wives. First wife from a marriage that ended over 30 years ago is 62 and trying to sign up for social security payments on my account. Law says she's entitled to 50%. And if I go first she gets death benefits. SS is the craziest thing I've ever been involved with.

Guido
12-03-2007, 03:33 PM
What the boss knows, but has trouble explaining to those seeking a payraise:

'A payraise for the employee will last about 90 days, then all his problems start resurfacing.'

G