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Davek0974
12-10-2007, 08:14 AM
Hi all,

i'm starting a new project soon and looking for some advice.

My past projects were quite small, usually using steel like EN1A and so on, nice and easy.

This new project is a half-size traction engine and i need to make the 2nd shaft and back axle as well as fabricate the crankshaft from round & bar stock.

I have been recommended to use EN24T for all the above which is supplied hardened and tempered.

Will i notice much going to this steel from what i am used to? It needs turning, boring & milling work done.

Is EN24T overkill or is there a better material?

Thanks in advance
Dave

SGW
12-10-2007, 08:54 AM
I don't know about the English steel designations, but my limited experience with pre-hardened steels in the US hasn't been particularly traumatic. I've found they machine pretty well. One just has to slow down a bit.

Ian B
12-10-2007, 09:04 AM
A 1/2 scale traction engine; sounds like a fun project. What machinery do you have to tackle it with? Pics?

Ian

rkepler
12-10-2007, 10:10 AM
EN24T is what this side of the pond calls 4130/4140HT. Nice stuff to work, just slow down a bit from what you'd use to turn a mild steel, maybe start where you'd run silver steel (what we call drill rod).

Davek0974
12-10-2007, 11:03 AM
Thanks all,

details of my basic shop are on my site at

http://www.davekearley.co.uk

Thanks

Dave

GrahamC
12-10-2007, 12:40 PM
This is brings up a good question (quite possibly already asked and answered but I will be darned if I can find it!)

Is there a quick and ready reference for converting/comparing/mapping codes like 4130/4140/12L14 (which I see in US books and magazines) to something like EN24T which I see in UK/Europe books and magazines?

cheers, Graham

Peter N
12-10-2007, 02:45 PM
This is brings up a good question (quite possibly already asked and answered but I will be darned if I can find it!)

Is there a quick and ready reference for converting/comparing/mapping codes like 4130/4140/12L14 (which I see in US books and magazines) to something like EN24T which I see in UK/Europe books and magazines?

cheers, Graham

Theres a few about. This sandvik one is quite handy as it's a print out and keep size:
http://www2.coromant.sandvik.com/coromant/pdf/smallparts/catalogue/P144-148.pdf

Peter

Davek0974
12-10-2007, 04:38 PM
Hi all,

ok, we have the crank shaft made out of EN24T, what about the webs??

They are about 2" x 1.5" x 3" long, it's a single-throw crank.

Is plain bright mild steel ok?

Thanks in advance.
Dave

lazlo
12-10-2007, 04:50 PM
Theres a few about. This sandvik one is quite handy as it's a print out and keep size:
http://www2.coromant.sandvik.com/coromant/pdf/smallparts/catalogue/P144-148.pdf

That's fantastic Peter -- now I'll know what metals you pompous Brits are talking about in the MEW articles :p

Sandvik even color-coded the interchange chart to match their insert color codes -- sweet! :)

boslab
12-10-2007, 05:45 PM
EN numbers came from the nutters in brussels, they have standards for standards and then another for listing them, they got standards for bananas, sausages, candles, condoms and anything else, but apart from that EN24 T is tough old stuff, itl do.
mark

oldtiffie
12-10-2007, 06:10 PM
Theres a few about. This sandvik one is quite handy as it's a print out and keep size:
http://www2.coromant.sandvik.com/coromant/pdf/smallparts/catalogue/P144-148.pdf

Peter

Thank you Peter - muchly.

That is truly the HSM "missing link" and regards HSM metal names and composition etc.

It answers all those "what the hell is that ............ ?" questions when a discussion mentions the various material designations in different countries.

If ever there was a "print it out and put it on the wall" chart, that would have to be one of the "must haves".