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View Full Version : OT:VCR and Tv obsolesence



Sophiedoc
12-11-2007, 10:30 AM
First it was Sony beta I threw away and now it looks like the the old faithful Zenith and older VCR since the grandkids want DVDs.Wife bought a combo DVD-VCR but won't hook up to old faithful Zenith since the old VCR connected only via coax to the antenna connection.(Used only for playback).Radio Shack has converter for about $50 that will let us connect the new combo player to the old Zenith but there must be another way.(This TV will be used only for playback of DVD and old VCR tapes-Thanks for any ideas.

Evan
12-11-2007, 10:46 AM
Just to clear this up a bit you are saying:

TV has no baseband composite video input, just a coax/antenna input.

DVD/VCR has no broadband channel 3/4 output, just a composite video output.

Is that correct?

One more question, is the old VCR playback only or will it record?

NickH
12-11-2007, 12:26 PM
My wax cylinder player was a real job to integrate with my LINN system:D

macona
12-11-2007, 12:42 PM
You just need a RF modulator. Pick one up of ebay or the like.

Sophiedoc
12-11-2007, 01:18 PM
The RF modulator is what Radio Shack wanted about $50.00 for which they said would work but am reluctant to go this route on the old TV.It will be used only for playback.The new DVD/VCR(still unconnected)has a coax input but not an RG58 type.Also has the usual video and audio jacks.Will check on Ebay for modulator or maybe just spring for a newer TV.Thanks.

Evan
12-11-2007, 01:55 PM
Well, you didn't quite answer the questions but you can probably use the old VCR as a modulator. Plug the video output into the VCR and use the coax output to serve the TV.

Note that this may not work if watching a commercial DVD movie. They are protected using the Macrovision system and by law your new DVD/VCR has a circuit that will detect the Macrovision signal and either refuse to pass it out to the VCR or just gibble up the signal quality.

macona
12-11-2007, 03:27 PM
Try someplace other than radioshack. They are idiots and overpriced. Any other electronics store will be better than them.

BigBoy1
12-11-2007, 08:08 PM
If I understand correctly, all of the current conventional TV sets will be render useless when all of the stations start broadcasting in High Def. in a few years. Everyone will have to go out and buy a new TV set to watch the new High Def. programs. Isn't progress wonderful? I think I just may stop watching broadcast TV and stick to video movies.

Bill

lwalker
12-11-2007, 08:51 PM
You can find video modulators much cheaper than $50. Look at Circuit City or eBay, etc.

But instead of a modulator, I'd just look for a cheap used TV that has composite or component video inputs. Considering that a friend of mine is selling his 36" Sony WEGA for just $100 (new it was close to $1000), I'm sure that you can find a nice late model TV on Craigslist for $50 if you live near a large city.

mochinist
12-11-2007, 08:58 PM
If I understand correctly, all of the current conventional TV sets will be render useless when all of the stations start broadcasting in High Def. in a few years. Everyone will have to go out and buy a new TV set to watch the new High Def. programs. Isn't progress wonderful? I think I just may stop watching broadcast TV and stick to video movies.

BillYou don't understand correctly but the govt isn't always clear, you will just need a digital tuner so you can pick up and watch standard def channels on your old tv. The picture you'll get is supposed to be much nicer over the digital broadcast, no more snow, either it comes in clear or it doesn't. If you actually go out and splurge on a new Hi Def you will really see a difference.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-definition_television_in_the_United_States
Added note, I have no idea what a digital tuner cost, but I would hope it wouldnt be more than a $100 item if not less.

If it helps you make the decision I recently bought my grandparents a hi def television set, we found it at one of the big box stores and it was around $500. Grandma wont shut up about the thing she loves it, cant believe the tv looks so good and it gets way more channels than their 20+ year old(I'm 31 and they have had it for as long as I can remember)tv, the old one was in a big wooden frame, must have weighed 200lbs and had knobs on the front so they never even knew they got all those extra cable channels.:)

Your Old Dog
12-11-2007, 09:05 PM
If I understand correctly, all of the current conventional TV sets will be render useless when all of the stations start broadcasting in High Def. in a few years. Everyone will have to go out and buy a new TV set to watch the new High Def. programs. Isn't progress wonderful? I think I just may stop watching broadcast TV and stick to video movies.

Bill

We just got a high def 40" Sony. It's the biggest screen that would fit in the entertainment center I built years ago. Wish I had room for a 50 or 60" !! This letterbox 16:9 format and high def with Dolby surround sound is the berrys IMHO. Now when I watch "How it's made" it's like being in the factory. Please pass the popcorn :D I had a highend 32" Sony Wega I had to give away to get rid of it!

Too_Many_Tools
12-11-2007, 09:22 PM
Always remember that commercial electronics/software are one of the worst purchases...the depreciation that occurs is tremendous.

As has been pointed out, you can use the old VHS player as a composite video to RF convertor...which is what I would do.

Never buy any electronics/software untill you absolutely have to...advice from one who has been an early adopter of technology and has the arrows in his back to prove it.

TMT

Too_Many_Tools
12-11-2007, 09:29 PM
You don't understand correctly but the govt isn't always clear, you will just need a digital tuner so you can pick up and watch standard def channels on your old tv. The picture you'll get is supposed to be much nicer over the digital broadcast, no more snow, either it comes in clear or it doesn't. If you actually go out and splurge on a new Hi Def you will really see a difference.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-definition_television_in_the_United_States
Added note, I have no idea what a digital tuner cost, but I would hope it wouldnt be more than a $100 item if not less.

If it helps you make the decision I recently bought my grandparents a hi def television set, we found it at one of the big box stores and it was around $500. Grandma wont shut up about the thing she loves it, cant believe the tv looks so good and it gets way more channels than their 20+ year old(I'm 31 and they have had it for as long as I can remember)tv, the old one was in a big wooden frame, must have weighed 200lbs and had knobs on the front so they never even knew they got all those extra cable channels.:)

Give it long enough and they will be paying you to take one...advertisers will not want to lose their access to the consumer.

The biggest problem we will see with the move to digital signal transmission is that it is an "all or nothing" effort...you either get the transmission or you don't. With people who have marginal reception...which is alot of people...the digital television will either have a picture or not. The day the cutover to digital happens there will be LOTS of complaining....as people upgrade antennas and boardcasters upgrade transmissions.

I would guess that many HSMers have small televisons in their shops that have marginal reception....all that will change when your reception quits and it takes some serious money and effort to restore it.

TMT

piniongear
12-11-2007, 09:34 PM
If I understand correctly, all of the current conventional TV sets will be render useless when all of the stations start broadcasting in High Def. in a few years. Everyone will have to go out and buy a new TV set to watch the new High Def. programs. Isn't progress wonderful? I think I just may stop watching broadcast TV and stick to video movies.

Bill
Well, once you get a good taste of High Def television you will forget having to buy a new set and what that set will cost you.
There is simply no comparing analog and Hi-Def. They are like light and dark in opinion.......pg

mochinist
12-11-2007, 09:43 PM
Give it long enough and they will be paying you to take one...advertisers will not want to lose their access to the consumer.

The biggest problem we will see with the move to digital signal transmission is that it is an "all or nothing" effort...you either get the transmission or you don't. With people who have marginal reception...which is alot of people...the digital television will either have a picture or not. The day the cutover to digital happens there will be LOTS of complaining....as people upgrade antennas and boardcasters upgrade transmissions.

I would guess that many HSMers have small televisons in their shops that have marginal reception....all that will change when your reception quits and it takes some serious money and effort to restore it.

TMTyeah where I grew up we had like five channels out of phoenix, they were snowy on good days.

Do many of you guys still use rabbit ears, I don't know anyone that uses them anymore, either they have cable or satellite or they dont have a tv at all.
I pay for satellite tv and radio and would give up the tv before the radio

Too_Many_Tools
12-11-2007, 10:30 PM
Well, once you get a good taste of High Def television you will forget having to buy a new set and what that set will cost you.
There is simply no comparing analog and Hi-Def. They are like light and dark in opinion.......pg

Each to their own opinion but for me I will likely stop watching television.

Even now most of the time the television is just background noise for us.

I have other priorities to spend my money on than spending thousands of dollars on electronics that will depreciate in a very short time and has the majority of programming that is not worth my time to watch.

I recall one article that predicted that televisions will be 30% cheaper after the holidays...that is serious cash loss in anyone's book.

TMT

Evan
12-11-2007, 11:30 PM
At the risk of repeating myself...

Nah, forget it...






:D

RTPBurnsville
12-12-2007, 10:31 AM
Yes, I still use rabbit ears and my TV is 13 inches of living color...

FWIW, The government will be issuing vouchers for use on digital conversion boxes for those that are interested in using older sets. The government is set to make a killing on the re-sale of the airwaves. The overall voucher cost to the government is peanuts to what they will reap in profits.

Weston Bye
12-12-2007, 10:47 AM
Just got a 14" LCD HDTV. It recieves Analog and HD channels over the air. No discernable difference between the two on that set. Sharp, crisp, clear. One improvement is that the broadcasters transmit multiple channels of programming on HD. Sometimes it's a decent alternative to the usual drivel. Others, it's just more drivel.

PTSideshow
12-12-2007, 11:03 AM
So soon we will have High Def ,crystal clear junk on the tube instead of just regular junk! Can't wait:rolleyes: :D

BadDog
12-12-2007, 12:20 PM
I'll second that!

sch
12-12-2007, 01:39 PM
Old TVs will be relatively useless, still good for watching SD
DVD and VHS tapes while VHS players still work. I've gone
through 3-4 tape players in the past 15yrs. This will do til
you can't stand to watch SD stuff after looking at HD for
3-4yrs, then you will chunk it all for a nice HD setup in 1080p
with your new HD-DVD recorder/player. In the interim HD
tuners are being sold for $50-150 and the feds are making available
Feb 08 a $40 voucher toward the cost of such a tuner, first come
first served til they run out. You will likely need an outboard
antenna for such and maybe a cheap antenna rotator, shades
of the '50s!! Depends on how scattered out the broadcast antennas
are and their directions from your locale. Or you could hope your
cable people are reasonable or ATT's Uverse is anything like what
it sposed to be. ATT is buying Dish network according to a recent
announcement.

RPM
12-12-2007, 01:48 PM
Sophiedoc - you mentioned that the new VCR/DVD player has the usual audio/video outputs, standard red/white/yellow - does the old TV have the same? Even my ancient TV (25 yrs) has these, and you can access them generally through 'Input Select'. An obvious thought, but could work if you have them...
richard from los Angeles

Evan
12-12-2007, 01:54 PM
25 years ago video/audio inputs were the rare exception, not the rule.

Todd Tolhurst
12-12-2007, 04:43 PM
Indeed; 25 years ago you were lucky to have a coax connector for RF input; plenty of sets still only had 300-ohm screw terminals. If you needed to connect to coax, it was off to Radio Shack for a balun.

Too_Many_Tools
12-13-2007, 01:15 AM
Old TVs will be relatively useless, still good for watching SD
DVD and VHS tapes while VHS players still work. I've gone
through 3-4 tape players in the past 15yrs. This will do til
you can't stand to watch SD stuff after looking at HD for
3-4yrs, then you will chunk it all for a nice HD setup in 1080p
with your new HD-DVD recorder/player. In the interim HD
tuners are being sold for $50-150 and the feds are making available
Feb 08 a $40 voucher toward the cost of such a tuner, first come
first served til they run out. You will likely need an outboard
antenna for such and maybe a cheap antenna rotator, shades
of the '50s!! Depends on how scattered out the broadcast antennas
are and their directions from your locale. Or you could hope your
cable people are reasonable or ATT's Uverse is anything like what
it sposed to be. ATT is buying Dish network according to a recent
announcement.

You forgot about the investment in tapes that people have....many thousands of dollars lost.

The voucher system is grossly underfunded...and is a joke. Their big concern is that no one will move to the new technology and then when the plug is pulled...whoa...look out for a ticked off consumer. You will soon see free converters being offered...and hundreds of millions of televisions being trashed in your landfill.

You also see digital televison sets selling for incredibly cheap prices as advertisers push to make sure that they do not lose their audiences.

The lesson...the longer you wait, the cheaper it will be to replace all your video electronics.

TMT

Evan
12-13-2007, 01:17 AM
Of course they will all be made with lead free solder and will last an average of three years.

rdfeil
12-13-2007, 03:07 AM
Evan,

Check the warranty on new electronics... 90 days if you are lucky:rolleyes:
3 years meantime between failure, I want you as my sales rep :D :D

Seriously, I have worked in and around the electronics industry and I think this HDTV thing is the worst government money grabbing thing to happen to us in a very long time. As mentioned earlier in this thread the govt is looking at making a fortune (literally BILLIONS) by auctioning off the excess band space to the highest bidder. Now you tell me, do they care about the better picture or just the picture of money?

Sorry for the rant at the end, it honestly started with the first two lines:p

G'nite all
Robin

sch
12-13-2007, 12:33 PM
[QUOTE=Too_Many_Tools]You forgot about the investment in tapes that people have....many thousands of dollars lost.


Don't have that many tapes, maybe 50-60, some of which I have found
$5-10 DVD to replace. Not to mention the coming obsolescence of SD
DVD over the next 5-7yrs. Just saw a $105 kit of HD DVD of the first
5 Potter movies. Now I am hoping the wife doesn't want to start
salvaging the 500 or so vinyl records we have, and she listens to regularly.
If she doesn't discover MP3 players I may be safe. Bought a combo
DVD recorder/VHS recorder thinking I could copy the tapes I have but
I am batting about 50-50 so far (macrovision I guess) so may have to
resurrect an older VHS recorder and use it to source the DVD recorder
on the theory it is probably pre-macrovision. Otherwise I will have to
run it through the computer and cobble up the software which I understand
is available to bypass macrovision.

macona
12-13-2007, 04:18 PM
There are DVD-R/VCR combos that will copy your VHS tapes to DVD. Of course it will be VHS quality. Plus who knows what the life of a DVD-R is. But then again VHS tapes go bad just sitting there as well.

I dont watch OTA television any more so I couldnt care less about the switch. heck, I rarely watch American TV the way it is. Consumers have had years of warning thats its coming. If they get ticked off they cant afford the $50 box if they are too lazy to get a job because they are watching daytime soaps then so be it!

Maybe the welfare rate will go down with the switch! ;)

tattoomike68
12-13-2007, 04:56 PM
Dont be so tight. 50$ to save you from getting a new $79 20" tv is ridiculous.

My woman is going blind with glocoma and diabetes, he are going to buy a 52" set so she can read any words on the screen.

If you want a newer tv cheap go to a hock shop.

topct
12-13-2007, 05:29 PM
In the last scene of the movie "Thunder Dome". The history of all that they know, is being spoken.