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Bob Farr
12-15-2007, 01:12 PM
I'm working on a 12x36 Atlas Craftsman, Model No.101.07383. I'm new to this hobby and this is my first machine tool. So far I've stripped and refinished the easy stuff, which was fun:

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/Paintsaddle2.jpg

Now I've managed to stip it completely down for some more difficult work:

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/Atlas12inch17.jpg

It has plain bearings, which caused me to stop the disassembly for my first question. If I remove the bearing caps will I have to pour & bore new bearings? I do not have the experience or equip for that. Can I remove the spindle to ease refinishing without pouring new bearings? Should I take advantage of the disassembly and simply replace it with a roller bearing head?

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/Headstock1.jpg

My second question is about the linear/transverse gear. It is screwed to the bed, but also has a pin at each end of the gear that looks like it has been peened over or seated with a punch. Is is a tapered pin? Can or should I punch it out to remove the gear?

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/Transversegear1.jpg

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.

- Bob

wmgeorge
12-15-2007, 02:19 PM
I'm working on a 12x36 Atlas Craftsman, Model No.101.07383. I'm new to this hobby and this is my first machine tool. So far I've stripped and refinished the easy stuff, which was fun:

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/Paintsaddle2.jpg

Now I've managed to stip it completely down for some more difficult work:

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/Atlas12inch17.jpg

It has plain bearings, which caused me to stop the disassembly for my first question. If I remove the bearing caps will I have to pour & bore new bearings? I do not have the experience or equip for that. Can I remove the spindle to ease refinishing without poring new bearings? Should I take advantage of the disassembly and simply replace it with a roller bearing head?

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/Headstock1.jpg

My second question is about the linear/transverse gear. It is screwed to the bed, but also has a pin at each end of the gear that looks like it has been peened over or seated with a punch. Is is a tapered pin? Can or should I punch it out to remove the gear?

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/Transversegear1.jpg

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.

- Bob


Bob I'm going to give you a couple of answers, but there are others on here who have done this a lot. I would not remove the gear rack unless you need to replace it for some reason. My guess is that they used tapered pins a lot like my old South Bend did. Mine also had plain bronze bearings, and under the caps they had shims to be removed as an adjustment for wear, I really would not plan on replacement with ball or roller bearings. Yes you can remove the spindle as a means to replace the belt. Keeping track of where parts came from is a difficult task. I yours was made by Atlas... good lathe. Time for the experts to take over!! Good Luck.

SGW
12-15-2007, 02:48 PM
I can speak only of South Bend, but the Atlas may be similar.

The spindle should be removable without total bearing disassembly. If you loosen the bearing caps, remove the setscrew(s) on the pulley and bull gear, and remove the take-up nut on the left-hand end of the spindle, you should be able to drive it out from left to right with a soft-face mallet. The bull gear, at least on the South Bend, is a tight push fit so it takes a bit of persuasion. I don't know if the Atlas is similar.

I'd get another opinion before relying too much on this for the Atlas.

I second the suggestion to leave the rack well enough alone.

bhjones
12-15-2007, 05:24 PM
For convenience I would recommend the roller bearing headstock. Simply for the higher spindle speeds. Given the vintage of this machine there is a good reason to keep it original though.

I pulled the rack off of the 10-F I went through a while back. I think it's an unnecessary step unless it damaged or broken. Clean it really good and tape it off.

Bob Farr
12-15-2007, 07:27 PM
Gentlemen,

Thank you for the suggestions. I will leave the rack alone and paint around it. I have plenty of work to do building a sturdy table and repairing/refinishing other parts of this lathe so I'll probably leave the headstock alone for the moment. It has some noticable play in the trust axis and I agree that higher speeds might be nice so I'll keep my eye out for a roller bearing headstock.

Does anyone care to estimate the vintage of this machine? It is model number 101.07383, and the bed has "9135 S" stamped into the top surface of the front way on the tailstock end. Also, if I put the plain bearing headstock back in service I'd like to replace the spindle oil cups with larger capacity automatic drip oilers. Can anyone recommend a source for good quality oilers?

Thanks,

Bob

bhjones
12-15-2007, 07:33 PM
With the one piece apron/carriage assembly and the lack of a power cross feed I'd guess it's mid to late 30's. Take a look at lathes.co.uk for more info.

Try McMaster Carr for the oil cups (www.mcmaster.com, search for "oil cups"). Alternatively, if you're not able to find a cup to your liking, it would make a fun project to turn a set.

Tim Clarke
12-15-2007, 07:43 PM
I used to have a 10" Atlas with the Babbit headstock, looked just like yours, only shorter. If I remember correctly all you need to do is loosen the setscrew in the adjusting collar at the far left of the spindle, and back off the collar a turn or so. This will give you a little clearance on the thrust bearing. Then, it's a simple matter to remove the bolts holding the bearing caps. Carefully lift off the caps, keeping track of any shims, so they can be put back where they came from. Then carefully examine the condition of the spindle, and the bearing area. These bearings aren't easily replaceable, they were poured in place, and bored to size and alignment in a fixture. So, it the bearing areas on the spindle are smooth, and the bearings look good, you should be good to go. I replaced my headstock with a roller bearing unit because the internal taper was a mess eventually, but the babbit stock served me well for about 10 years.

My best advice would be to fix it up as nice as you can without spending much money. Run it awhile and see if you like it and it fits your needs. If so, go back and do things like new crossfeed nut, half nuts and maybe new feedscrews if yours are worn.

By the way although I don't remember now what the difference is, the babbit spindle and the roller spindle aren't quite the same. So, you'll need to get a Ebay headstock with spindle, and bearings. Your backgear assy. will go right on, and so will the step pulley. Or at least mine did.

Best of luck, Tim

Bob Farr
12-16-2007, 04:46 PM
My best advice would be to fix it up as nice as you can without spending much money. Run it awhile and see if you like it and it fits your needs. If so, go back and do things like new crossfeed nut, half nuts and maybe new feedscrews if yours are worn. Best of luck, Tim

Gentlemen,

Thanks for the additional tips and the reminder not to get financially carried away with the restoration. That's easy to do! I think I'll stick with the plain bearing head for a bit, refurb the broken and worn parts (there's a few) and just refinish the rest.

Thanks,

Bob

smithdoor
12-18-2007, 09:27 AM
The plain bearing is use in most engines
The most important keep lot of oil on the bearing try a dip type if your cups do not have it now.
Also good is it is a flat bed way to refurbish can be done on a surface grinder
.

David Smith