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KiloBravo
01-29-2008, 09:03 AM
Hi,

I am going to attempt to weld a stand for my RF45. It's about 800 lbs.
What do you think I should use ? I was thinking box tube or round pipe ?
Anybody know what size I should use ? I want it to be sturdy, but I
would like to save a few bucks so I don't want to completely over
engineer it.

Thanks,
Kevin

SDconcepts
01-29-2008, 09:18 AM
i would use 2x2 square tubing and have a .125 wall thickness. that maybe a little over kill but would be safe. i bought the factory stand for my 2 rf45s and they work just fine.

KiloBravo
01-29-2008, 09:25 AM
Yes, I bought the stand also from HF. I just don't like the height. It is 28" tall, and does not feel sturdy enough for me. Also, I want the height to be around 33" tall, that puts the handles right at a good spot for me.

I just got a quote on 20' of 2" box tube with 1/8" wall for $30.60.

Carld
01-29-2008, 09:35 AM
What's an RF45?

SGW
01-29-2008, 09:49 AM
A Rong-Fu 45. A common import mill/drill.

kben77: Yes, get the height right, for you. Your back will appreciate it.

BobWarfield
01-29-2008, 12:22 PM
http://www.cnccookbook.com/img/Welding/MillTable/P6053451.JPG

4" square tubing legs, 1/4" plate top. Way beyond what was required. It's solid and may as well be a granite block sitting under my Industrial Hobbies mill. I would think 2" square tubing would be just as wonderful and a little less crazy.

Definitely more solid than the factory stand which I also have. Was it worth it? No idea, but I like my stand.

Cheers,

BW

Alistair Hosie
01-29-2008, 03:21 PM
nice table Bob just whet the Doctor ordered:DAlistair

BobWarfield
01-29-2008, 04:57 PM
nice table Bob just whet the Doctor ordered:DAlistair

My one regret is its not green. But you can't be perfect!

Cheers,

BW

Alistair Hosie
01-29-2008, 05:28 PM
I don't know Bob it's not too late : besides many of my machines despite rumours are blue.Alistair

KiloBravo
01-29-2008, 06:29 PM
Actually, Bob your stand is the reason I decided to weld one. I got the HF stand and it was only 28" high and pretty shaky. I had seen yours before while I was surfing the net and decided I wanted to weld one up.

So first I had to get a Welder. Then I had to run the electric. No, small task :)
I used a 100' of #6 wire. Of course the panel had to be on the opposite side of my basement the farthest point it could be from where I wanted the outlet in the garage. I managed to get that all wired up and to code. Now, I just need to puchase the tubing and practice my welding :)

BobWarfield
01-29-2008, 06:49 PM
Actually, Bob your stand is the reason I decided to weld one. I got the HF stand and it was only 28" high and pretty shaky. I had seen yours before while I was surfing the net and decided I wanted to weld one up.

So first I had to get a Welder. Then I had to run the electric. No, small task :)
I used a 100' of #6 wire. Of course the panel had to be on the opposite side of my basement the farthest point it could be from where I wanted the outlet in the garage. I managed to get that all wired up and to code. Now, I just need to puchase the tubing and practice my welding :)


So you used a relatively inexpensive table as an excuse to buy a much more expensive tool?

Ingenious! I shall try that one out on the missus next time I'm after something.

Seriously though, I welder is a hugely useful thing to have around. You won't be sorry!

Best,

BW

PS Alistair, yeah, you have nice machines of all descriptions!

pntrbl
01-29-2008, 09:10 PM
With an 800 lb mill I'd use 1/4" wall 2"x2" instead of 1/8". No scientific reasoning to support that hypothesis .... LOL! .... just intuitive on my part. That'll double the cost of your stick tho.

SP

ProGunOne
01-30-2008, 02:13 AM
I got the HF stand and it was only 28" high and pretty shaky

I'm curious, which HF stand do you have?

GKman
01-30-2008, 07:27 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v494/gkman/MillStand.jpg

Here's mine. 2 X 2 X 3/16 angle, 3/16" top. Vibrates some when cutting hard. So what? Mill and workpiece are moving together. It's a work in process. Most shelves built ahead of time hold mostly air so am installing shelves as needed until it gets full and then gusset and maybe enclose. Looking like a door on the front and left side. Design-wise, the top only has to transfer the mill weight and boltdown a couple of inches over to the top of the legs. Hard to imagine anything too light to do that. The band connecting the top of the legs together is nothing more than an assembly aid. Same with the band around the bottom. Legs should be anchored to the floor. After that, what does the bottom band do besides make a footrest and a place that's hard to sweep? If I wanted weight to reduce vibration, I'd put a great big chunk in the hollow under the mill base where it would do the most good. Viva la difference and have fun.

Your Old Dog
01-30-2008, 07:43 AM
I have the HF stand for mine and it is rock solid. I set it on 4 eight inch cement blocks and it's pretty comfortable.

I would suggest if you don't make your table much wider than the base that you spley the legs out a bit to offer more stability to it. Over the length of the legs 5" at the floor should offer you considerable stability. Also, if you are a neophyte welder the splayed angles and proper design will offer a modicum of safety to the welds you make Grasshopper! A chop saw would work fine for cutting the angles.......... You do have a chop saw don't you? :D

(besides that, a chop saw is extremely handy and should be included with every welder!)

sconisbee
01-30-2008, 12:14 PM
(besides that, a chop saw is extremely handy and should be included with every welder!)

Ahh but you can use the fact you have no way to cut the tube as an excuse to buy a small bandsaw!...

on a more serious note, 2x2 square should be enough and its much easier to get a nice fit and finish than with round tube... and it doesnt try and roll away while your tacking it!
:D

KiloBravo
01-30-2008, 02:17 PM
This is the stand I have
http://www.harborfreightusa.com/usa/itemdisplay/displayItem.do?itemid=47599
It is only 25" high. When I purchased it, I thought the height was 30" (My mistake)

I tried the cement block route and it is still unstable to me. I think the plate on the bottom maybe bent, or it's my cement floor. The thing I don't like is overall the stand is pretty hefty about 100 lbs. (It says 133 but I can lift it pretty easily so I doubt it is 133 lbs.) However, the panel on the back and the door on the front reduce the rigidity of the stand significantly, IMO. I was thinking about welding them shut, but then it is still too low for me. I am 6' 1" and a 33" or 34" table height suits me better.

Regards,
Kevin

I already have a Band Saw. I bought that a week after hack sawing metal stock for a few days :)
http://www.harborfreightusa.com/usa/itemdisplay/displayItem.do?itemid=93762

Bob Ford
01-31-2008, 12:02 AM
Build a form for concrete to raise the existing stand to the height that you want.
This will give you a nice base and you can grout the stand so it is firm and level.
Bob