PDA

View Full Version : Quality hacksaw



chief
02-02-2008, 12:10 AM
My 40 year old hack saw frame finally died, any recomendations on a new qaulity one?

Oldbrock
02-02-2008, 02:04 AM
Get a Lennox with the tensioner below the handle. Nothing else comes close when it comes to blade tension

SDL
02-02-2008, 03:31 AM
The best i have used is sandvik, unbelievable tension.

Steve Larner

Forrest Addy
02-02-2008, 03:37 AM
You have a shiop and metalworking skills. Find a saw you like, measure it up and make some sketches, then build your own. I did 'way back when.

I like the ones with the single lever tensioning and the place to store a few blades. They didn't have those features back when and I wasn't smart enough to look 40 years in the furure.

Your Old Dog
02-02-2008, 09:20 AM
My 40 year old hack saw frame finally died, any recomendations on a new qaulity one?

Yeah, Sawzall, heavy duty and 1" stroke plugged in and hanging off the side of the bench near the vice :D Lifes too short for hacksawing!

Evan
02-02-2008, 09:49 AM
Amen to that. I'm not sure where my hacksaw is now. I can't recall the last time I used it.

smiller6912
02-02-2008, 09:57 AM
My favorite hacksaw says "Sawzall" on the side of it.
Seriously, this is as key of a piece of shop equipment as your screwdrivers, do not be afraid to spend some bucks, You won't regret it, rigidity is paramount.

Mcgyver
02-02-2008, 10:52 AM
when you find what you want, get a couple , its handy to have different pitches ready to go...i have three hanging on an L bracket above the vise. you guys that say you don't use them - how would you cut of a piece of say 1/4 CR or other small stuff?

JoeFin
02-02-2008, 11:12 AM
Yep

Especially if you decide to cut some SS you'll need hardened blades

The Sawsall is nice but not anything in the way of accuracy. I have a couple of horizontal bandsaws but really wish one of them was nice vertical bandsaw.

kendall
02-02-2008, 11:58 AM
Yeah, Sawzall, heavy duty and 1" stroke plugged in and hanging off the side of the bench near the vice :D Lifes too short for hacksawing!


I must be going in reverse then, I have two sawsalls, a couple mini belt sanders and a power planer etc but always reach for the hacksaw, file, or hand plane.

Ken.

JohnWFoster
02-02-2008, 12:02 PM
My Sandvik must be 20 years old and still a pleasure to use.

Evan
02-02-2008, 12:07 PM
how would you cut of a piece of say 1/4 CR or other small stuff?

I have 12" and 30" pairs. Saves a lot of wear and tear on the arm.

http://vts.bc.ca/pics/bcut.jpg

A.K. Boomer
02-02-2008, 12:20 PM
I must be going in reverse then, I have two sawsalls, a couple mini belt sanders and a power planer etc but always reach for the hacksaw, file, or hand plane.

Ken.


Im with you on that, I have a snap-on hacksaw and it gets used all the time, its actually a pleasure because it cuts so well ----- I have not seen a pic of the sandvik so cant comment -- but the best designed hacksaws that iv seen so far have the rectangular top tube (you also store spare blades there)

The rectangular tube allows for minimal side clearance and maximum strength in the direction you need it -- blade cutting and tension ,,, there are lots of others that have this design ---nicholson HD and lenox HD to name a couple --- they can be had on sale on amazon right now for 20 bucks,

My snap on is so rigid that if you dont heed the warning on how many turns of the blade tensioner you will pop blades just by tightening,
By all means it you build one use a rectangular top tube, round or square is much weaker and will rob precious side space.

A.K. Boomer
02-02-2008, 01:16 PM
Accurately copy this and I guarantee you wont be disappointed.

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r249/AK_Boomer/DSC00160.jpg

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r249/AK_Boomer/DSC00159.jpg

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r249/AK_Boomer/DSC00163.jpg

John Stevenson
02-02-2008, 01:46 PM
Just had a look what a Sawzall is as I'm not familar with them.

Turns out they are what we call sabre saws over here and didn't realise they were for metal, [ proves you learn something everyday ]

I have one of these and have been using it today to cut a load of pallets up for firewood.

Just nipped out and got some metal blades for it this afternoon so I'll give it a whirl later. Don't know if it because ours are 240 volt and so is the rest of the world but these come up on offer here for about 15 every so often, about $30.00 ?

I also have about 10 hacksaw frames but the best of the lot are the two Lennox the same as Boomer has listed.
If you are ever offered on of the modern tubular Eclippse frames the run but in the opposite direction, your knuckles will thank you...

.

sconisbee
02-02-2008, 02:10 PM
+1 vote on the Sandvik/Bacho ones love em!......and i agree on the eclipse tubular ones dont like them at all niether do my hands:P

JCHannum
02-02-2008, 02:34 PM
I have a Sawsall and a Portaband. The Sawsall is only used for wood and scrapping metal, chopping out exhaust sytems and similar precision applications. The Portaband gets a little more use, most often in the vise as a vertical bandsaw.

I have a 4X6 horizontal bandsaw for most work, but keep about four hacksaws by the bench and use them frequently. My favorites are the straight handled ones with a handle like a file handle. I find I get the best control from this and it is the one I use the most.

The hacksaw, file and chisel are the basic metalworking tools, and should never be overlooked.

rhmalsch
02-02-2008, 09:10 PM
Milwaukee Sawsall with Milwaukee blades labeled "The Torch". No affiliation.

jdunmyer
02-02-2008, 10:32 PM
Lennox. I have one each with 18, 24, and 32 TPI blades, so never have to change. Also try to use Lennox blades.

Regarding hand work: I always razz my buddy when he's sawing with one, "Doesn't that make you feel like that old German craftsman, working at his bench?"

There really is something to that. :-)

andy_b
02-03-2008, 12:44 AM
i used to have three hacksaws.
one was an old one that belonged to my grandfather. i guess it was kind of cheesy because one day i was tightening the blade and the frame cracked in half.
another one was a cheap one i bought many years ago. here is a good shop tip. never use a hacksaw as a parting blade on a lathe. when one of the chuck jaws grabs it out of your hands it tends to make a mess of the hacksaw frame.
the third one is a Stanley brand. it seems to work fine. one place i used to work had a Snap-On hacksaw. i guess it was fine if you wanted to spend 5x what a generic hacksaw costs if you need to have that Snap-On name on it.

i do prefer the horizontal bandsaw or a 4 1/2" grinder with a cutoff wheel to a hacksaw though.

andy b.

A.K. Boomer
02-03-2008, 01:15 AM
one place i used to work had a Snap-On hacksaw. i guess it was fine if you wanted to spend 5x what a generic hacksaw costs if you need to have that Snap-On name on it.

.


Or you can score one for 5 bucks at a garage sale :p

R W
02-03-2008, 02:45 AM
Just make sure you buy a top quality one, results are straighter cuts and less
broken blades.

Fasttrack
02-03-2008, 04:26 AM
Awsome post - i need a new one too; i've gone through three so far. One stanley that was actually really nice until a plastic piece broke, a no-namer for 5 bucks which worked great until the frame broke a month or two later and a craftsman which hasnt broken but sucks to use. (just uncomfortable)

shadoof
02-03-2008, 05:31 AM
I'll buy these if I see them at boot sales, up to 3

http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t20/shedfull_2007/sandviksaw.jpg

Then one day sees this,

http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t20/shedfull_2007/sandviksaw2.jpg

"ow much " says I "15 quid" ($30 ?) mmm thinks I, 20 in shops...then she says
"but you get 50 blades as well"

I got the saw and 100 blades for 20. :)

TECHSHOP
02-04-2008, 11:48 PM
One of my hacksaws is a Starrett.

Life is too short to spend changing blades for the correct TPI, or walking across the shop to find a hacksaw; so hacksaws (about two dozen different ones) are scattered around the shop at random.

Ok, everything is scattered all over the shop.

A.K. Boomer
02-05-2008, 10:47 AM
I bet the starrett is pretty stout and well made also,

I understand many peoples comments about snap-on and their expense but I bet a starrett hacksaw is right up there price wise,

Snap-On is outrageous on much of their stuff, they piss me off too --- but -I bought most of my hand mechanic tools at the age of 17, After 30 years of hardcore abuse I still have all of them -- they have either been replaced for free or are the original (minus a 14 mm wrench which i lost)
As far as being a mechanic and using something else, yes i could get by --- but it would definitly be a compromise --- things like getting to bolt heads that have minimal side clearance --- even years ago snap-on boast the thinnest wall socket with the highest strength ---- they had "flank drive" over 25 years ago, its a small radius in the inside corners of each and every socket/wrench, this radius drastically increases socket/wrench strength --- And because it does not load the fastener on its points it also increases how much torque the fastener head will take before failure, Like it or not, nobody even comes close, expensive as they are they are built by people who actually do some thinking in there engineering, and go through some extra pains to put the stuff out...

pcarpenter
02-05-2008, 11:59 AM
You don't have to spend Snap-on money to get one of the good high-tension hacksaws. I have two...one a Lennox and one by Stanley and I think both are about $20 nowdays--maybe less on sale. The key is the design and not the name on it. The high-tension saws use a lever action part of the hand grip to apply tension, You squeeze this lever and latch it into place and the blade is highly tensioned.

I do also own a couple of the standard POS tension-with-a-wing nut types. I now relegate them to cutting plastic tubing with a fairly coarse blade in them.

The reason I keep two of the good ones is that I keep two different blades (one coarser for soft stuff and one finer) at hand. I find that a hacksaw still has value as it takes less time with the hacksaw to cut small stock or whack the head off a bolt etc. than to set up the bandsaw. Its also useful for re-cutting screw slots etc.

My take on a reciprocating saw (Sawzall is Milwaukee's brand name) is that its pretty much a destructive tool. Think of it as a power hack saw with one end of the blade flopping loose....doesn't help much when your goal was to say put a new slot in a screw head etc. It also takes more time to get it out, find the hex key, put in the proper blade and use it than to just be done with a small job with the hack saw. On the other hand, I would never want to cut very much by hand....the horizontal bandsaw is for larger items.

BTW John...what we call a sabre saw over here in the states is the item with the blade running vertical and a fence that rides on the work....aka a "jig saw"--commonly used for more careful cutouts than a reciprocating saw would be. Its probably confusing since they both use reciprocating blades.

Paul

DancingBear
02-05-2008, 01:14 PM
I've got a couple of the high-tension Starrett frames, and yes, they're nice. I think they run about $25 each. But I suspect the cheap knock-offs are pretty good too, the key is the lever tensioner, as Paul points out.

Blades are a different matter. Get some good bi-metal blades, the cheap ones are false economy as they wear out much faster. I mostly use Starrett as the local supply house carries them, but I've used Morse and they seemed pretty good too. I'm sure there's other good brands too, it seems to be a 'get what you pay for' proposition.

Walt

Your Old Dog
02-05-2008, 01:19 PM
I think a Sawzall deserves it's own mantle in the Tooldom !! Bought mine only 5 years ago thinking it might not be all that useful. It has saved my wagon many many times. As a joke, I actually thought of making something like a gunrack display for it to hang on the wall in honor :D I may still do it some day! As it is now, it hangs off the end of my workbench on a big hook, all plugged in and ready to go.

(I wonder how one of the new battery operated vesions would work when dumpster diving? Hell, would allow you to cut up anything piled up at the trash curb and fit it in the family car. Actually, now that I think of it, I can justify it for the new travel trailer as you aren't allowed to have a chain saw in a campground. They have some great rough wood cut blades available. Hell this might actually happen)

http://cgi.ebay.com/Milwaukee-6515-20-Sawzall-18v-Cordless-Recip-Saw-NEW_W0QQitemZ130194356137QQihZ003QQcategoryZ42289Q QtcZphotoQQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

old-biker-uk
02-05-2008, 05:25 PM
.....Find a saw you like, measure it up and make some sketches, then build your own......

Or two !
http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/remark/pages/hobbies/images/saw4pair.jpg

Mark

kendall
02-05-2008, 07:01 PM
(I wonder how one of the new battery operated vesions would work when dumpster diving? Hell, would allow you to cut up anything piled up at the trash curb and fit it in the family car. Actually, now that I think of it, I can justify it for the new travel trailer as you aren't allowed to have a chain saw in a campground. They have some great rough wood cut blades available. Hell this might actually happen)



I have a porter cable 19.2v sawsall, plenty of power, but short battery life, half hour or so. Runs maybe half what my circ saw runs on a full battery, but cuts smoother and faster than my Dewalt corded sawsall. I think that's because it's heavier overall. Lot tougher than the dewalt.

Ken.

DancingBear
02-05-2008, 07:43 PM
Mark,
Those are beautiful! Are the frames cast?

Walt

38_Cal
02-05-2008, 08:01 PM
Lovely old saws, Mark.

For screw slotting, where you don't want to take the time to set up the mill, and need it on center, go to the Brownells website at http://tinyurl.com/39d5ve. This is a tool I designed a couple of years ago when I was working there.

David
Montezuma, IA

DancingBear
02-05-2008, 08:17 PM
Very nice! Now I have another project. As if I needed more projects...:rolleyes:

Walt

pcarpenter
02-05-2008, 11:36 PM
Mark's "lovely old saws" are not old at all as I recall. I believe I remember a posting some time back in which he showed off his handiwork. They really are nicely made and have that look of something made when aesthetics still mattered!

David-- when I saw your previous post, I noticed Montezuma, IA. I didn't think of Brownells, but perhaps I should have. What first came to mind was SIG (models) from my model airplane days back in the late 70's-early '80's. Very nice work on the screw slotting fixture by the way!

Paul

38_Cal
02-06-2008, 01:01 AM
Thank you. One of my design parameters was to come up with tools that a small shop or hobby gunsmith could use without having to own a mill or lathe, or could use to get a quick job done without having to set up his machine tools. In this case, it's easier to turn a half-dozen special screws and hand slot them than to set up an index head and the slitting saw on the mill. More dollars in the till for the gunsmith, more happier retail customers with good screw slots on new or rebuilt screws on their fine firearms.

David
Montezuma, IA

ProGunOne
02-06-2008, 01:14 AM
For screw slotting, where you don't want to take the time to set up the mill, and need it on center, go to the Brownells website at http://tinyurl.com/39d5ve. This is a tool I designed a couple of years ago when I was working there.

Cool, I like it. A couple-three years ago, I sent them (Brownells) a set of home-brew aluminum barrel bushings for the FAL rifle barrel that fit their barrel vise to measure and copy. I see they sell them now.

Larry Backer
02-06-2008, 01:54 AM
Mark,
Are the plans for your power hacksaw that you show on your website available. It looks like a compact unit, I would like to build something like that.
Thanks
Larry

pntrbl
02-06-2008, 02:15 AM
Mark,
Those are beautiful! Are the frames cast?

Walt

I'm pretty sure the Old-Biker-UK made those hacksaws by hand. You oughta see some of his other work. The guy should have an art exhibit .......

SP

old-biker-uk
02-06-2008, 05:01 AM
Thanks for the comments on my saws, details of them & others here. (http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/remark/pages/hobbies/tools.html)

Larry - The article on the hacksaw was published as a construction series in 'Model Engineer' starting in Vol. 103, pp269 (August 24 1950) unfortunately my copy it tight bound so I can't scan the drawings but I will ask around to see I if I can find some loose copies for scanning.

Mark

andy_b
02-06-2008, 11:24 PM
They have some great rough wood cut blades available. Hell this might actually happen)

http://cgi.ebay.com/Milwaukee-6515-20-Sawzall-18v-Cordless-Recip-Saw-NEW_W0QQitemZ130194356137QQihZ003QQcategoryZ42289Q QtcZphotoQQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem


well if your ebay handle is hill006, it looks like you got yourself a sawzall. :)

i think if i found a Dewalt for that price i may just buy one as well. i have a bunch of other Dewalt 18V tools, so i have a lot of batteries i can use.

EDIT: i just checked ebay and there are TONS of Dewalt cordless tools. i can't believe i never searched for them before. at the prices they seem to go for i just may pick up the rest of the entire 18V collection.

andy b.

lakeside53
02-07-2008, 12:10 AM
Accurately copy this and I guarantee you wont be disappointed.

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r249/AK_Boomer/DSC00160.jpg

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r249/AK_Boomer/DSC00159.jpg

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r249/AK_Boomer/DSC00163.jpg


I think someone already has.

I bought a Lenox hacksaw today - $29 - Looks indentical... 38,000lb tensile they say.

davidh
01-07-2009, 07:56 PM
i threw mine away years ago and replaced it with a florida pheumatic straight die grinder with a 4" dia x .035 camel brand cut off disc. not a guarded muffler cut off tool, just a biga() die grinder.

when i cut stuff on the lathe bed i use my milwaukee bandsaw, but thats seldom.

wouldn;t be without the cut off disc. . in fact i just cut a 20lb propane cylinder apart with it after flooding the stinky cylinder with co2 from my astro mig130 welder. it took about 5 minutes tops. . . could not have done it with a hacksaw and the band saw would not fit due to the capacity of the band saw.

dockrat
01-07-2009, 09:02 PM
i threw mine away years ago and replaced it with a florida pheumatic straight die grinder with a 4" dia x .035 camel brand cut off disc. not a guarded muffler cut off tool, just a biga() die grinder.

when i cut stuff on the lathe bed i use my milwaukee bandsaw, but thats seldom.

wouldn;t be without the cut off disc. . in fact i just cut a 20lb propane cylinder apart with it after flooding the stinky cylinder with co2 from my astro mig130 welder. it took about 5 minutes tops. . . could not have done it with a hacksaw and the band saw would not fit due to the capacity of the band saw.

I love those .035 cut off discs!!!! I have one angle grinder with a 4" mounted on it and also one mounted on my Bosch 10" compound mitre saw. That miter saw has cut more metal than it has cut wood