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kjbllc
02-13-2008, 12:37 PM
I have a nick where it must have hit by the tool rest. I am thinking that I can file it down at an angle so as not to hit the machined part. Is that the right way?

http://i254.photobucket.com/albums/hh92/kjbllc/nicks.jpg

also I am missing the thumb screw on the micrometer, is that a standard thread or try to get it from SB parts place?

http://i254.photobucket.com/albums/hh92/kjbllc/thumbscrew.jpg

thanks.

Oldbrock
02-13-2008, 05:18 PM
Hi, its me back. the gouge in the compound should not cause a problem unless there is some metal pushed into the dovetail. You could gently file the dovetail with a three square (triangular) file. You could see if you can find an allen head capscrew to fit the compound dial. The compound never sits in shown position.It is usually set at 29 degrees toward the tailstock from where it is now for screwcutting . any other setting is for taper turning or reducing small dia incremints. If you wish you may email me at brockley@shaw.ca

kjbllc
02-13-2008, 05:25 PM
thanks Ill send you an email.

davidh
02-13-2008, 05:30 PM
for new thumb screws i just matched up small allen head screws, they are already kinda knurled. 10-24 sounds familiar. . . saw off whatever length you don't need. . .

Fasttrack
02-13-2008, 05:30 PM
Hmm looks like a 10" SouthBend? With a decent size chuck on there its very easy to accidently nick up your cross-slide. Its even easier to nick your compound with jaws, especially if you have the compound extended like its shown in the picture. I've done it myself once or twice but never with power-feed so i always heard a slight tinking noise and got things under-controll before any damage was done.

Anyhow, it shouldn't cause any problems at all. Just make sure it doesn't hinder the movement of the compound. As far as the set screw, test the thread with a couple of bolts until you find the right one, then your first project can be to make yourself a little thumb screw. If it were me, i'd start with a pre-made hex head bolt to avoid cutting threads and then turn the head down to be round. Then knurl the round bit for some grip and ta-da!


Oo - just read DavidH's reply - thats a good thought! Just get you a socket-head cap screw.

IOWOLF
02-13-2008, 05:32 PM
It's a 50 year old lathe, prol'y older than You, Do You Got any nick's or screws missing?

kjbllc
02-13-2008, 05:42 PM
It's a 50 year old lathe, prol'y older than You, Do You Got any nick's or screws missing?

quite right! actually the lathe is somewhere around a 1981, at least that is what I was told, and it was made in south korea, which kind of surprised me for a usa lathe, and I am older than that and past the 50 year mark too. ;)

SGW
02-13-2008, 08:25 PM
That dial locking screw may be 10-28, in which case you'll need to make one.
(The gib screws on my SB are 10-28; I don't know about the dial screws.)

Update: I just checked. The dial screw is 10-32...at least mine is.

IOWOLF
02-13-2008, 08:58 PM
South Korea? I'd bet it's not 10-32.

It looks like 50's vintage USA.

JCHannum
02-13-2008, 09:09 PM
From the photos, it appears to be a South Bend. If it is the Light Ten previously discussed, it is made in USA.

At some point, South Bend had castings made in Korea and it is possible this lathe used these, but machining, fitting & assembly was done here.

kjbllc
02-14-2008, 04:57 AM
From the photos, it appears to be a South Bend. If it is the Light Ten previously discussed, it is made in USA.

At some point, South Bend had castings made in Korea and it is possible this lathe used these, but machining, fitting & assembly was done here.

That could be, its on the tailstock end, it might be just the casting part. I will post a pic of it.

kjbllc
02-14-2008, 05:00 AM
That dial locking screw may be 10-28, in which case you'll need to make one.
(The gib screws on my SB are 10-28; I don't know about the dial screws.)

Update: I just checked. The dial screw is 10-32...at least mine is.

thanks I will check that out. at this point making threads that small seems like a really hard thing to do.

kjbllc
02-14-2008, 05:02 AM
the compound is a little stiff when you screw it all the way in, there are set-screws on the side are they for adjusting the amount of play? Can I take the top part of the compound off and clean it, or is it better not to mess with it? thanks.

SGW
02-14-2008, 09:16 AM
To take the compound apart, you need to remove the dial assembly and handle. This isn't difficult, but you may want to wait until you get more comfortable with the machine before you try doing it. You can probably do about as well by loosening the gib screws -- you can even loosen them enough to slide the gib out, but keep track of which end is which for reassembly -- and applying oil, cranking it back and forth.

Or, if you're feeling brave, here's how you take off the handle. Set the compound about mid-way in its travel. At the bottom of the boss that has the dial reference line on top, there is a hole for a pin spanner (for lack of a better name). Or you might call it a hook spanner or a pin wrench. Assuming you have a suitable pin spanner, unscrew the dial assembly from the body of the compound. If you DON'T have a suitable pin spanner, you can achieve the same result with a close-fitting dowel pin in the hole, tapped with a brass punch or similar in the proper direction down close to where the pin goes into the hole.

BTW, the gib screws on the slides are for adjusting, yes. You want to adjust for free travel, minimal slop.

kjbllc
02-14-2008, 10:50 AM
thanks, I will start with just lossening the screws a bit and file the edge down, and then see what happens. You have given me the info now I have a reference.

also I emailed leblond for info on my lathe.

. Serial Number: 40160K
2. Catalog Number: CL370ZD
3. Size: 10"X3.5'
4. 1/2HP; 208V/3PH/60CY
5. 1725 RPM
6. Ship Date: October 8, 1982


thanks for all the help.

SGW
02-14-2008, 01:59 PM
? File what edge down?

kjbllc
02-14-2008, 02:47 PM
? File what edge down?


on the picture 1st page, there is a nick on the end that sticks up.