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View Full Version : How I fixed A Busted Arbor Press Frame



SouthBend9
02-14-2008, 08:04 PM
1. Clean & grind generous fillets .
2. Use and support pieces . In this case a large steel block .
3. Pre Heat the frame with rose bud tip to 600 F min. check frame with templistik. Set oxy to 20 and Acty. to 8 lbs
4. Change tips to a 4 set oxy to 10 and acty to 8 lbs in this case and with 1/8 braze rod up side carfully as to not to braze and secure the steel block . Tin the fillet when up to 1400 f and proced to fill in. If the braze balls up you are not up to temperature nad you have to achieve proper temp of it not going to be a good weld. Remove block
5. Braze accross the top of table fillet as I did the side .
6. When finish cool cast Iron Slow . We use a Quench into Agricultural Lime . In this case was 2 80 lb. bags in a Rubber maid container with loc lid. Putting fire brick into the bottom to support frame. If you don't do this the lime will not supprot the weight of the frame and the heat of the frahttp://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg260/560Dennis/ArborPress020-1.jpg
http://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg260/560Dennis/arborpress011-2.jpg
http://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg260/560Dennis/arborpress009.jpg
http://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg260/560Dennis/arborpress006.jpg
me will burn through the plastic.
7. Celebrate.
This job as it is took about 3 hours and you will need alot of help.

Credits to : Bill West instructor and Lakeland Community College and my classmates for going the extra mile to help us move the hot frame around to position the fillets to be welded.

ckelloug
02-14-2008, 08:33 PM
Wow,

This is a neat set of pictures and a nice explanation. Congrats on fixing an old tool.

--Cameron

SouthBend9
02-14-2008, 09:11 PM
I got alot of experience from this project and will be repairing a major crack a IHC C113 cast iron 4 cyl. engine block next in much the same way and if it interest you I will post those pictures and steps we took. But first I want to heal up the sun burn I got from 3 hours of welding .

Your Old Dog
02-14-2008, 09:15 PM
Sounds like interesting project. Don't know if the server is down or what happend but the pictures are not showing to me as I write this.

oldtiffie
02-14-2008, 09:32 PM
Sounds like interesting project. Don't know if the server is down or what happend but the pictures are not showing to me as I write this.

Thanks YOD.

Same here.

After reading the text of the OP, I'd like to see those pics too.

SouthBend9
02-14-2008, 09:43 PM
I gues I deleted them off Photobucket , so resending them on this reply , Sorrryhttp://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg260/560Dennis/arborpress009.jpg
http://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg260/560Dennis/arborpress006-1.jpg
http://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg260/560Dennis/ArborPress020.jpg
http://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg260/560Dennis/arborpress011.jpg

SouthBend9
02-14-2008, 09:54 PM
http://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg260/560Dennis/arborpress008.jpg
http://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg260/560Dennis/arborpress005.jpg
http://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg260/560Dennis/arborpress015.jpg

GKman
02-15-2008, 02:16 PM
With old cast it's the iron that gets to tell the weldor if it's fixed, but you sure did work on it, I'll give you that.

macona
02-15-2008, 05:20 PM
You forgot the last part. Cross your fingers! ;)

Unfortunately for cast once its broken it will never be nearly as strong as it once was.

You are leaving the steel block in place, right?

CCWKen
02-15-2008, 06:47 PM
"Unfortunately for cast once its broken it will never be nearly as strong as it once was."
That may be true for the rest of the cast but I've never had one break at the weld/braze again. ;)

Nice job. I never knew they had that equipment at Lakeland. They must have expanded since I was there (~1984-86). :eek: I spent a lot of nights at Lakeland before moving on to Lake Erie and finishing my graduate work at Baldwin Wallace. (Great fast-track business program at the time.)

SouthBend9
02-15-2008, 08:46 PM
You forgot the last part. Cross your fingers! ;)

Unfortunately for cast once its broken it will never be nearly as strong as it once was.

You are leaving the steel block in place, right?

Not sure if that one or a longer rail on both sides .
Did you see the the milled chamfer with the stepped cut was made to cut out a porous blow hole that must have help to fracture this frame.

Oldbrock
02-17-2008, 03:12 PM
Just an aside, the press was broken, Dolly Parton is busted!!!!

clutch
02-17-2008, 03:32 PM
Very nice post. Your repair may last a good long time. Years ago, someone left a block in a Sheriden toggle style die cut press, destroying one of the toggles.

We contacted a firm that told us to ship every piece we could find to them and they would put it back together.

From what I can tell they packed the pieces together in mold sand, took it up to heat in a furnace and poured in molten braze.

The results were impressive, nice braze lines, somehow the braze only stuck where they wanted it and the toggle ran until the plant closed a decade later.

Clutch

SouthBend9
02-18-2008, 11:28 PM
The braze does not mix with the base metal and like the ferrous rods. Cast Iron has a high carbon content. The carbon saturates the welded joint and creates a brittle zone.

I have and IHC C113 engine block that someone tried to weld with FE rod . It did not hold up. I had to use a Carbide End Mill to Cut that weld out of there. The weld absorb all that host carbon from the base metal and made a super hard weld stringer . I got all cut out and have to make supports shafts for crank . cam and head deck before I start the braze weld repair. Show you this in the next episode.