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View Full Version : Why I don't open my own machine shop - Chapter 1



Your Old Dog
02-23-2008, 05:58 AM
I finally got a QC tool holder and think it has helped the look of my work dramatically as evidenced by this photo.

http://inlinethumb15.webshots.com/40270/2981101110102651310S600x600Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2981101110102651310tdfLPl)

I had to remanufacture a part and got started with the threading process.

http://inlinethumb13.webshots.com/38284/2763548540102651310S600x600Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2763548540102651310cPiQsD)



The thread came out perfect but still wouldn't fit the brass collar it was made for? Spent better part of 2 hours cutting this perfect 10 tpi thread and then decided to drag out the thread gage again.

http://inlinethumb35.webshots.com/2530/2364699040102651310S600x600Q85.jpg (http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2364699040102651310cGxRKA)

I did it again as a 12 tpi and it fits perfectly. I still have a lot of machining to do to get this where it's supposed to be so I know I still have a lot of opportunity to screw it up :D

John Stevenson
02-23-2008, 06:10 AM
Clumsey bastard......................




.

Your Old Dog
02-23-2008, 06:24 AM
Clumsey bastard......................




.

I would have bet my life you'd say that ! ROFLMAO

Evan
02-23-2008, 07:21 AM
It would be more effective speeled correctly.

Your Old Dog
02-23-2008, 08:33 AM
It would be more effective speeled correctly.

And the long and the short of that problem is why I don't teach school ! Kids seem dumb enough these days, they don't need, or is it knee'd or knead any help from me. :D

torker
02-23-2008, 09:03 AM
YOD.. yup you can so open your own machine shop. You just have to learn to work late into the night to fix your screwups. Don't ask how I know this :D
Russ

shadoof
02-23-2008, 09:09 AM
Work by yourself and all your mishtakes stay your own :D

torker
02-23-2008, 09:16 AM
Oh yes.. if you want to screw up for sure...tell your customer..."Yes, I can do that for you right now. Just stand aside and watch me while I work" :D

Bill Pace
02-23-2008, 09:29 AM
Just stand aside and watch me while I work" :D

Groan!! --- Lordie, I don wan nobody lookin over my shoulder...anytime!! ---- A customer??....Puleeese, no!:eek:

JoeFin
02-23-2008, 09:39 AM
Some one needs to make a poster for my shop I can hang on the wall with a BIG pile of scrap parts in the back ground and these words in BOLD red print.

"Measure Twice - Cut Once"
"Measure Twice - Cut Once"
"Measure Twice - Cut Once"......

tony ennis
02-23-2008, 09:42 AM
"Measure Twice - Cut Once"

Not good here in moronville.

"Think thrice, Measure Twice, Cut One"

malbenbut
02-23-2008, 09:43 AM
"Measure Twice - Cut Once"
"Measure Twice - Cut Once"
"Measure Twice - Cut Once

Done that and its still to short
MBB

John Stevenson
02-23-2008, 09:52 AM
"Measure Twice - Cut Once"
"Measure Twice - Cut Once"
"Measure Twice - Cut Once

OK got three parts, all 1/3 the length they should be , now what to do with them ??



.

torker
02-23-2008, 09:58 AM
Groan!! --- Lordie, I don wan nobody lookin over my shoulder...anytime!! ---- A customer??....Puleeese, no!:eek:
Bill, I had to throw that one in. The girl who works with me... she's still very self concious about people watching her work. She found a sign under the bench in the shop. It reads "Employees Only Beyond This Point! "
That sign is now front and center over the entrance door.

38_Cal
02-23-2008, 10:10 AM
My stepdad was a carpenter/cabinetmaker. His line was "I cut it off twice & it's still too short!" I don't like customers watching with gunsmithing, because sometimes the proper tool for a job is a big d@mn hammer! Although, there are times when it's fun to watch the blood drain from their faces when you drag it out...

David
Montezuma, IA

IOWOLF
02-23-2008, 10:22 AM
Measure with a Mic., Mark it with soapstone, Cut it with a torch.

Lew Hartswick
02-23-2008, 10:36 AM
Measure with a Mic., Mark it with soapstone, Cut it with a torch.

Or as the carpenters say,
measure with a scale, mark with a crayon, cut with an axe.
...lew...

Your Old Dog
02-23-2008, 11:09 AM
Or as the carpenters say,
measure with a scale, mark with a crayon, cut with an axe.
...lew...

Don't laugh, that's why Canadian Carpenter comes in 5 gallon buckets and a with putty knife.












edited to add: JUST KIDDING!

rdfeil
02-23-2008, 12:39 PM
I cut it off twice and its still to short:confused: Obviously an engineering problem and I'm not an engineer :rolleyes: Send it back to R&D :D

Been there, done that !

Peter N
02-23-2008, 01:20 PM
Been there, done that too!

Last year year I scrapped several aluminium U bars had made, almost finished with one more op to do after adding a 1/2" radius to both corners of a 1" bar to form a full rad on the end.
I kept thinking my rotary table and centering setup was wrong, as each time I set the offsets and turned the table to make a cut, the rad came out wrong and had a 'dig-in' to the bar after turning round 90 degrees to the side.

Of course if I had bothered to measure the end mill first I would have realised that I was using a 13mm cutter instead of a 1/2".......

However, for *really* embrassing stories, remind me never to tell you about the time I got locked in the toilet at work.

Peter

John Stevenson
02-23-2008, 01:33 PM
OK, never tell us.


:D

clutch
02-23-2008, 02:41 PM
There has to be differing levels of stress when you have 5 bucks of stock at risk or some thing costing thousands or more. Risking my own stuff is just enough excitement for me.

Clutch

Willy
02-23-2008, 05:01 PM
Don't laugh, that's why Canadian Carpenter comes in 5 gallon buckets and a with putty knife.

YOD, that's a good one, I'll have to remember that one.

I always used to say...the only difference between a good carpenter and a bad one is a sheet of drywall and a bucket of mud.

Hard to do when working with metal in thousands of an inch, or less.
But I know how. That's what welders and grinders are for.:D

Your Old Dog
02-23-2008, 07:12 PM
YOD, that's a good one, I'll have to remember that one.

I always used to say...the only difference between a good carpenter and a bad one is a sheet of drywall and a bucket of mud.

Hard to do when working with metal in thousands of an inch, or less.
But I know how. That's what welders and grinders are for.:D

Well since you took it in such good spirit I'll have to confess the joke was originally told to my dad and me by a Canadian Aluminum Siding contractor working in the states but he called it "American Carpenter" :D


There has to be differing levels of stress when you have 5 bucks of stock at risk or some thing costing thousands or more. Risking my own stuff is just enough excitement for me.

Clutch

That's my biggest problem. I remember when that chunk of aluminum was worth next to nothing and now you can buy a damn nice meal for what it's worth. I remember how I squealed when I needed to buy 1 ounce troy of 24K gold wire for inlay and engraving at $360.00. I was damn near afraid to use the stuff and still have about 7/8oz troy left! That's one case where it worked in my favor...........but only one.

gearedloco
02-23-2008, 07:37 PM
I cut it off twice and its still to short:confused: Obviously an engineering problem and I'm not an engineer :rolleyes: Send it back to R&D :D

Been there, done that !

As the Engineering folk at the Lab where I used to work were wont to
proclaim, "It worked once! It's a maintenance problem."

Oldbrock
02-24-2008, 02:36 AM
I thought a sign I saw in a repair shop would fit somewhere. Shop rate - $50 per hour, you watch - $75 per hour, You help - $100 per hour. Peter