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Mcgyver
03-06-2008, 06:51 PM
hadn't posted many pics lately, so a few weeks ago i snapped up a bunch of my UPTI experimented a bit with the photos – its just a black piece of cardboard with the shop lights off and sunlight through a window. Camera is a P&S Nikon P3 (I affectionately call it my POS P&S). It does have the advantage over other P&S that you can control aperture. Everything is done with a tripod and no flash. I also put my name on each pic, what the heck, I made ‘em :)

The project is the Universal Pillar Tool, a classic designed by George Thomas. I went full bore and made all the accessories including the sensitive drill head.

Here’s a smaller tapping head. For the newer guys, not breaking taps depends on keeping them straight so this tool is very handy. I used the end off an Eclipse pin vice of some sort, but still had to make a collet to fit common small tap dia. The bushing in the arm has a small spring underneath the threaded brass cap that presses light on the rod – very handy as the tapping head stays where you leave it and doesn’t fall into the work.

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b201/michael0100/upt%20pics/uptwithsmalltappinghead.jpg

Here’s a close of the small tapping head handle showing the “D” coupling. This is my design and gives and positive drive without having to tighten anything. It’s a snug fit, won’t fall off accidentally.

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b201/michael0100/upt%20pics/uptsmalltapheadhandle.jpg

Here’s a larger tapping head

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b201/michael0100/upt%20pics/uptwithlargetapinghead.jpg

Mcgyver
03-06-2008, 06:51 PM
It’s handle is held on by a hex I laid out and hand filed. I’d heard filing hex’s that fit perfectly in each position was the sort thing they’d assign apprentices to teach them to file so thought it would be a good test. It fits amazingly well, the secret is to use a bit of blue as you’re getting close and be very specific about where you are removing material

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b201/michael0100/upt%20pics/closeupoffiledhex.jpg

Reconfigured a bit, the tool becomes a staking/riveting tool. Here a couple of blank tools are shown.

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b201/michael0100/upt%20pics/uptwithstaking.jpg

Similarly, a square bushing holds number/letter stamps

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b201/michael0100/upt%20pics/uptwithpunch.jpg

The bushing for the square punches is interesting – there are two springs with detent balls underneath to hold the punches in place – a very nice feature!

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b201/michael0100/upt%20pics/uptsqbushing.jpg

Mcgyver
03-06-2008, 06:52 PM
stupid image limit


The most complex accessory is the drill head. It works very well and is a pleasure to use. There is an extra casting for this kit but they wanted a fortune for it so I carved my own.

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b201/michael0100/upt%20pics/uptwithdriil.jpg

Here’s a close up.

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b201/michael0100/upt%20pics/uptwithdriilheadcloseup.jpg

Lot’s of accessories to make. This photo’s a little dark, I still need more exposure experimentation I guess. Most of the staking/punching tools are made but not yet hardened.

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b201/michael0100/upt%20pics/uptaccessories.jpg

It resides in an old drawer with a lid. Hey at least it keeps the condensation off. One day a better made box will get done

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b201/michael0100/upt%20pics/uptstorage.jpg

Hope that was of interest

laddy
03-06-2008, 07:17 PM
WoW!!! Beautiful and useful piece of work! Applause!! Looks Great!

IOWOLF
03-06-2008, 07:24 PM
So That's what you have been up to.

Cool.

lane
03-06-2008, 07:29 PM
Love it .Always wanted to build one . Wish I could get the castings. Looks great.

thebusdweller
03-06-2008, 07:30 PM
Outstanding! You should be proud, Tom

New chips
03-06-2008, 08:21 PM
Looks real good. Were did you purchase the castings and how much finishing was required?

Ed Tipton
03-06-2008, 08:39 PM
Very timely. I have been thinking of doing a UPT as a project and fleshing it out with accessories to make it versatile. Your UPT is exactly the type of tool I had in mind...and you have incorporated several ideas that I must admit...I will probably use. I am not interested in making another drill press since I have one that functions perfectly, but the hand tapping and letter punching and transfer punches are all very usable and are perfect for a UPT. Thanks for sharing your excellent pictures and ideas with us. This is exactly the type of thing this forum needs.:)

BobWarfield
03-06-2008, 11:11 PM
Awesome job on that!

Hemingway still lists castings:

http://www.hemingwaykits.com/acatalog/Universal_Pillar_Tool.html

Cheers,

BW

andy_b
03-06-2008, 11:28 PM
NICE!!!!!
how did you make the D adapter for the small tapping head?
also, how does the drill work? what i mean is, the part connecting the hand lever to the top of the drill spindle, what are the details for that? how does it spin and how does it account for the changing angle as you lower the handle?

very nice work!!!

andy b.

darryl
03-07-2008, 01:18 AM
Very nice. That gives me more ideas for my shoe sewing machine conversion.

Ken_Shea
03-07-2008, 01:42 AM
Mcgyver,
That is such a so sweet piece !

The photo's are great, I think maybe you missed your calling.


Ken

Ken_Shea
03-07-2008, 01:46 AM
There was on YouTube a guy that made something similiar, anyone recall what it was called or saved a link ?

Mcgyver, if you had not seen the YouTube video you would like it I am sure.

Thanks
Ken

JRouche
03-07-2008, 01:59 AM
Remarkable!!! It always amazes me on the precision a craftsman can achieve. Your work is a motivator for me to put more time and effort into all projects. I gotta stop being such a hack... JRouche

abn
03-07-2008, 02:36 AM
Just another compliment...very nice. Lot of good ideas there.

Alguy
03-07-2008, 03:00 AM
Nice work ! Anything i would would be redundant.

Norman Atkinson
03-07-2008, 03:11 AM
McG, you are to be complimented. My UPT is part finished if you include the drilling top. Nevertheless, it is extremely useful as it stands. I'm a bit lazy because I have a small sensitive drill.

So I am wanting you all to admire the excellence but a few queries can be answered.

The first is 'information'. Apart from Model Engineer, the late guru George Thomas wrote the two books the Universal Pillar Tool and Dividing and Graduating before setting off to collate his main work called the Model Engineers Workshop Manual. Sadly, our mentor became too ill and he never finished it. Later, Neil Hemingway persuaded a friend of mine to take up the task. So W.A Bennett or Bill, a retired dentist and fellow student with my missus took on the task. Bill went on to collate the two earlier books into one entitled 'Workshop Techniques' All by Tee, incidentally.

OK, originally I had a fabricated one but not the drill attachment. It is perfectly feasible to weld up steel sections- and get there. I'm not an engineer! Again, one of my associates 'carved' one out from solid and exhibited it at a Model Engineering Exhibition. Sadly, Frank Romvari never got the recognition that I thought he richly deserved.

So on to the UPT book. It contains two sets of drawings. One is for the Mark One and the other for the Mark 2 which is so ably illustrated here.
The Mark 1 has split clamps and tended to nip after final slitting. Mc G's has cotters. Excuse me, going off at a tangent but the Chaddock Quorn tool and cutter grinder has split clamps and-- mine nipped!

So back to the Workshop Techniques. This contains not only the Mark 2 drawings but the small Dividing Head and a Headstock one. Again, it shows how to make division plates using one hole. Great stuff here!

So one little bit more. Mc G's excellence is not to be igbored but a UPT can be built from 'Mini con rods'

Sorry, Mac, but this Anno Domini thing is getting near this old fellow and I wanted to get it down before I became like Old George!

Mcgyver
03-07-2008, 08:43 AM
Thanks very much everybody!

Castings were bought eons ago, maybe Power Model Supply when they were around? can't remember. They are still available I believe, check with model engineering suppliers. While cast iron is nice, you could make the whole thing from bar stock like i did the drill head.

Andy, here how i made the D shape. take a piece of brass, say 3/8 dia. Boring the bottom 1/2" to the D's ID radius, milling a section a away, soldering on a flat piece. now, back to the lathe, and turn the OD to neatly drop into a bore in the brass handle and solder (or loctite). if you look at the pics you can see the the lines that shows these fabrication. Hard to explain the drill mechanism with a reasonable amount of typing and my camera is currently busted. I'll take some detailed pics when i can. basically there's a gimbal with a bearing at the top with a radial groove in it. two pins in the gimbal fit into this groove (you can see them in the last pic),

Norm, I have that book, always thought it was basically a reprint of Thomas's two other books? anyway, I like it. Also, years ago HSM did a excellent build article that appears in one of the project books. There'd be minimal welding if you didn't make from castings, for example the arms could be machined from say 1.5 x 1.5 steel stock. Our be luxurious and get some Durabar :)

The other note i'd make is I went with peened over tommy bars throughout. This is a departure from the traditional ball handle which is more difficult to make and by many's standards the 'right' way to do it. imo the tommy bars are superior as the can be operate from two positions and there are lots of pinch point set ups where this is a real advantage, the traditional charm of ball handles not withstanding

thanks again for the kind words, keeps me motivated :D

Your Old Dog
03-07-2008, 09:02 AM
Fantastic job Mac! Very inspiring. As always your workmanship is great. Like JRoach, I gotta stop being such a clumsy bastard :D

Orrin
03-07-2008, 09:58 AM
Hope that was of interest

Wow! I should say it was.

Thank you for posting the pix of our outstanding workmanship. I had not idea of the versatility of the UPT until seeing the variety of accessories you've made. Fantastic!

Best regards,

Orrin

LizardKing
03-07-2008, 10:22 AM
Thanks very much everybody!

Castings were bought eons ago, maybe Power Model Supply when they were around? can't remember. They are still available I believe, check with model engineering suppliers. While cast iron is nice, you could make the whole thing from bar stock like i did the drill head.

For all the Americans interested in one of these, I bought a full set of castings from http://www.martinmodel.com/ a few months ago.
Quality if really good and he does have more at around $100 plus shipping for a set which includes 2 arms, table, base, and drill head.

Of course I have not yet tackled machining them but I wanted to make sure I got them when they were available.

regards,
TheLiz

Duffy
03-07-2008, 11:11 AM
That is certainly superb workmanship. Hemingway's castings are only about $100.00 give or take, but with shipping they would be over $150.00. Could one use either aluminum castings, or 6061 bar stock ?

Norman Atkinson
03-07-2008, 12:29 PM
Duffy,
I can see no reason why aluminium castings cannot be used.
Nor for that matter is fabrication with MS welding a problem.

Err, umm, cast iron isn't the strongest material that I can imagine.

Going off a tangent, a real one- the gibs in certain small lathes are plastic.
Going off into a real tangent, there are wartime articles in Model Engineer about fabricating model steam cylinders and if my memory is still holding out- a headstock for a lathe out of--------shhhhhhhhhh, concrete.

Presently, I am making up bits and pieces from the Thomas 'stable' but wondered with this fabricated Stent, why we don't use plastic for a lot of things. After all, I have a plastic drill grinder somewhere and I expect a lot of things which I cannot recall. Dammit, I've got a bloody big sledge hammer with a fibreglass shaft. Oh, and my tumbler gears on the Myfords are tufnol.

Why not? Don't say it was me that said it.

Cheers

Norm

andy_b
03-07-2008, 10:18 PM
Andy, here how i made the D shape. take a piece of brass, say 3/8 dia. Boring the bottom 1/2" to the D's ID radius, milling a section a away, soldering on a flat piece. now, back to the lathe, and turn the OD to neatly drop into a bore in the brass handle and solder (or loctite). if you look at the pics you can see the the lines that shows these fabrication. Hard to explain the drill mechanism with a reasonable amount of typing and my camera is currently busted. I'll take some detailed pics when i can. basically there's a gimbal with a bearing at the top with a radial groove in it. two pins in the gimbal fit into this groove (you can see them in the last pic),


thanks! it kind of looked like the D was pieced together, but i wasn't sure.
yes, if you can get another pic or two of the drill it would be great. i believe i understand what you are saying though.

andy b.

tiptop
03-07-2008, 10:42 PM
I am going to have to agree with JRouche on this one. I need to be more meticulas and your work always looks great.

matador
03-07-2008, 10:57 PM
"This photo’s a little dark"
Mac,try a background using a medium grey.I have found this to be far more effective in bringing up detail.I use an A2 sheet of card,which can be bought at any drawing supply store.Some craft places also sell them.
As for the UPT,a great job! I especially like the array of accessories you made for it.Makes my puny efforts pale into insignificance:).
Well done,that man!:D

Kd0afk
12-18-2012, 03:01 PM
None of the photos in this thread show up. Something about them being deleted.

Mcgyver
12-18-2012, 03:19 PM
I moved some stuff around on photobucket...there, I fixed it for ya :)

Willy
12-18-2012, 03:45 PM
Wow! Thanks for bringing this back up to speed so to speak, I missed it the first time!

Very nice work, it looks very elegant in both style and function, never mind the execution of the project itself.
Also the lighting definitely enhances the overall theme of the project.

sasquatch
12-18-2012, 04:12 PM
Beautiful piece of work, and yes great to have this bumped up!!

Mcgyver
12-18-2012, 04:32 PM
Also the lighting definitely enhances the overall theme of the project.

thanks guys!

was going through a creative phase :D with the photography......I know how to expose etc but was experimenting trying to get most of the frame and background dark with the highlights of the item lit...sort of a workshop Ansell Adams idea without all the darkroom fussing about lol....the idea being striving for an interesting image rather than correctly documenting the item. Some are more effective than others...but that's the story as to why the don't look like say the last pic :)

RLWP
12-18-2012, 05:51 PM
I have always admired this tool - I think I have a set of Model Engineer mags with it in.

I have a set of redundant 'A'-series con rods too...

Beautiful and inspirational, I'm glad this thread has resurfaced

Richard

J Tiers
12-18-2012, 09:19 PM
OK....

First, that looks very nice... excellent work. beautiful, actually......

Now I have a question, and I hope I can word it so that it doesn't come out wrong............

I have always wondered, it's a great looking tool, has attachments out the wazoo, can do all sorts of things, but what is it GOOD for? Perhaps someone who has one fully outfitted can explain it to me...

My experience with such things is that inevitably they are always configured for something that is NOT what you want to do now. I don't have a UPT, but I DO have a Tumico mic covering 0" to 5"..... in 5 ranges with different anvils. I bought it when I had very few mics, and even then I barely used it, it was always set wrong, and by the time i fiddled with it to get it set to do my measurement, I had nearly forgotten why I did so.....

Is the UPT like that? I'd suspect so, knowing the very wide variety of things I do.

I recently made a tool JUST for tapping, and even though it needs shelf space, at least when I need it, I can pick it up and use it without doing anything but putting the right tap in it.

jkilroy
12-18-2012, 10:00 PM
While I don't have a UPT in my shop I would like to. Years ago, in a shop that I worked in, someone had made a UPT like tool using the base, column and table for a smallish floor standing drill press. There as a tapping arm for it, that was made from a rather crude weldment. Though it was crude I used that tapping arm a lot. Someone had also made a 90 degree shelf so you could use the shops mag drill on it, which worked great. There was a mount to use a spot welder on it, but that thing was a rigged so bad (the spot welder) there was no way I was touching that, looked like a death wish.

Anyway, switch over from one task to another was virtually instant. All of the attachments just lived on the post, swing one out of the way, swing the other into play, very quick and easy. A very nice setup all around.

vincent
12-18-2012, 11:46 PM
Looks Great!

Black Forest
12-19-2012, 02:26 AM
Nice project and it is clear you really put a lot of effort into the project.


Didn't Lane build a pilar something and fab the parts that are normally cast? Seems I recall some years back he built one of these great tools also.

camdigger
12-19-2012, 03:55 AM
Nice work Mcgyver!

I am contemplating a beefed up version of the UPT as an imitation of the Cole drill possibly with a line boring option. Still wearing my scalp out with all the head scratching over the details...

Ed P
12-19-2012, 07:45 AM
That's nice work. I built one so I know how much time and effort you put into it. I'm really impressed with all those punches you made!
But I have to ask, you grooved your cotters so why didn't you pin them?

Ed P

Mcgyver
12-19-2012, 08:35 AM
thanks all. Ed the cotters are pinned. The two arms are castings, drill head is bar stock...sanded and filled so you can't see them but each has a pin. If you're wondering what we're talking about, the cotters are grooved and there is a pin installed in the arm or whatever they go into....said pin keeps the cotters aligned so things go together quickly. Its a bunch of extra steps at the time but a nice luxury on split cotters

Arthur.Marks
12-19-2012, 10:27 AM
...build a pilar something and fab the parts that are normally cast?
I found the drill head machined to look cast very motivating. I like me some curvilinear design :) Speaking of, I have to bring up the crankcase article, Constructing an Antique Crankcase, part one and two especially. Those two articles appeared in Sept/Oct '12 and Nov/Dec '12 of The Home Shop Machinist. A mix of waterjet, milling, turning, rotary burrs, undoubtedly some hand filing, and sandblasting makes a very convincing "cast" crankcase. While I have absolutely no interest in motorcycle parts, the article is a wonderfully creative process-piece. Recommended for those looking for ideas in achieving the cast profile look.

rohart
12-19-2012, 08:06 PM
I didn't see this at the time. Very nice work indeed. Now I see your credentials for suggesting a couple of months back that I document the Quorn I've just finished !

Tony Ennis
12-20-2012, 12:50 AM
When using this for staking, riveting, or stamping, do you hit the top of the tooling with a hammer, with the machine being used to hold he tooling vertical?

Jpfalt
12-21-2012, 12:47 AM
I built the Martin Model set of castings. He has two versions, a 3-1/2"arm length and a 5" long arm for wider workpieces.

I use mine for tapping, reaming, stamping and spacing. The staking and reaming are mostly for clock repair where the hole is positioned under a tapered point, reamed with a clockmakers reamer, a bushing is driven in with a flat point staff or staked if needed and then the ID of the bushing is reamed to final diameter. The tapping is done on just about any project.

I am building a Bridgeport style drilling head based on the motor and gearset from a 9.6 volt cordless drill.