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Bob Farr
03-08-2008, 08:37 PM
I salvaged this stainless steel rolling fridge from the local McD's. With the broken refrigeration components removed from the base there is space for a 12-15 gal solvent tank and pump. The basin is nice and deep and already has a drain, so I have the makings of a very nice penny-tech parts cleaner here. Investment so far: $1.39 for a Coke after loading it in my truck.

The local boating supply store has some plastic fuel cells that I think will work well for the solvent tank. Does anyone have a suggestion for a 110V pump that will work well for this application? I usually use diesel, lamp oil or mineral spirits for cleaning solvent, but is there a better low flash point solvent for a dedicated unit like this? What is Varsol?

All safety advice and suggestions are solicited. Thanks in advance. I'm not interested in burning the house down.

Bob

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/Fridge1.jpg

Wayne A Thackery
03-08-2008, 09:29 PM
Bob, great find! One way to keep your solvent clean is to put a few inches of water in the bottom. The solvent will float on top and let all the crud settle into the water on the bottom. This can be drain off from time to time and you will never have to add solvent....just water. Put the pick up for your pump up in the solvent area. With the tank being stainless you will never have to worry about it rusting out.

torker
03-08-2008, 09:32 PM
Bob...That'll make a darn nice parts washer. If it was me I'd just buy a parts washer pump. Lots of places sell the parts washers but they also sell replacement pumps. Usually $40 or so and they are made for that purpose.
I use them pumps for coolant systems as well.
Russ

lane
03-08-2008, 10:05 PM
I have always used the Little Giant submersible pumps.

JRouche
03-08-2008, 10:58 PM
Bob, great find! One way to keep your solvent clean is to put a few inches of water in the bottom. The solvent will float on top and let all the crud settle into the water on the bottom. This can be drain off from time to time and you will never have to add solvent....just water. Put the pick up for your pump up in the solvent area. With the tank being stainless you will never have to worry about it rusting out.


Now this is a great TIP.. I love it.. I dont use the good solvent anymore, petrol based, but those that do it is a good trick. I add water and it just mixes in.. Thanks for the tip. JRouche

Tim Clarke
03-08-2008, 11:16 PM
Harbor Freight has a cheepy solvent pump. You'll want to fab up some kind of a lid. That will stop evaporation, for the most part. Also in the rare case of fire will give a way to shut off the air to the fire. Keeping it closed will keep out unwanted things, like sparks from grinding activities. A expanded steel basket will be useful, along with a brush with a hose to feed solvent thru it.

Try looking up Safety Kleen in the phone book. They handle the servicing of the tanks at work. Also in the yellow pages under 'Solvent"

Over the years, I've tried mineral spirits, kerosene, even diesel. I like what the dealers call "stoddard solvent"

TC

Bob Farr
03-08-2008, 11:57 PM
Thanks for the tips so far gentlemen. In the past I've just used some kerosene or diesel in a bucket and disposed of it right away so there was never a lingering fume issue. But this will be stored in our attached garage with the solvent in it, so I need to make it as fume-proof and safe as possible. So, in addition to switching to low-odor mineral spirits as a solvent, here's what I have in mind:

http://i58.photobucket.com/albums/g272/frankenglide/Fridgetank.jpg

This is a 12-gal polyethelene fuel tank for a boat. It would fit nicely in the compartment below the wash basin. The pump would work like a drain P-trap as a vapor barrier, I can put a stopper in the drain, and I would run the tank vent line into the basin area. The top edge of the basin has a lip and a 2" edge. I will put some sticky-backed foam sealer on that edge, like the kind used to seal between the edge of a truck bed and a topper. Then I'll hinge a plywood workbench surface off the back of the unit that will drop down onto the basin edge and seal it up when not in use. Venting the tank into the basin should trap any evaporation fumes between uses. The whole unit is on rollers so it would be easy to roll outside before use and run a drop cord out to it.

I still have to check about the solvent compatability with the polyethelene tank, but you get the general idea. This will mostly be used to degrease metal motorcycle parts and greasy machine tools.

Any thoughts?

Ian B
03-09-2008, 01:43 AM
Tim,

You mention "Stoddard's solvent" - that's basically what WD-40 is.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WD-40

Ian