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View Full Version : A Xmas present for all



halfnut
12-24-2001, 05:30 PM
I have much enjoyed this forum since I found it. Enjoy the people, and appreciate the knowledge I have learned. I put in my 2 cents at times, I have learned from these, and hopefully they have helped someone.

So here is a little present for all, this is a link I found on this or another message board. I have been enjoying this well made site, thanks to someone for putting it together for our purusement.

http://shopswarf.orcon.net.nz/sindex.html

Merry Christmas all.

spkrman15
12-24-2001, 06:55 PM
Halfnut,

thanks alot. This info is going to be great for me. Maybe one day i will even understand it all....hahaha


merry Christmas

Spkrman

Thrud
12-24-2001, 09:53 PM
Thanks! And a Christmas eve tip for you...

Just remember if you see a big fat guy in a red suit to ask questions first and THEN shoot if he did not bring you what you wanted!

charlie coghill
01-02-2002, 12:40 AM
Thanks Halfnut; This looks like a real usefull site. May save some time. Just call up the page print it out, and out to the shop with it.

kap pullen
01-02-2002, 02:32 PM
Wow!
What a great site.
All that info in one spot.
But how about some sheet metal bend allowances.
Cheers and thanks.
Kapullen

George Hodge
01-04-2002, 08:07 PM
Hey thanks halfnut! Interesting site!! How do you have time to find these neat informational sites?

halfnut
01-05-2002, 10:12 AM
George,

I spend too much time surfing, I think someone had this link on Chaski's board. I've had this computer for over 3 years now, man do I have a lot of bookmarks. I used to work 2nd shift, net works good in the middle of the night.

Was off the internet for a few months almost a year ago, in that few months about that many more thousand web sites were added. Amazing the proliferation.

Kap,

Bending that metal, there is the old 2/3 rule, but it doesn't always work. Cut, bend, trim. Know better on the next one, that is if you are making more than one.

I have this old lathe, man I traded with for it and I decided it was a New Haven. The taper attachment, and cross slide are like a New Haven. This site has pictures of Gleason lathes, just like my New Haven, or is it actually a Gleason. Only names on this old machine are stamped into the rear of the tailstock, whether they were people whom built the machine or those whom had ran it. Who knows for sure.

sketch15
01-05-2002, 07:35 PM
Kap,
It is much easier to use outside bend deductions which can be found in the Machinery Handbook. Most of this kind of stuff can get you pretty close, but alot depends on what style of tooling your using.American or European.
Hope this helps some,
sketch

Thrud
01-06-2002, 03:36 AM
Kap

Sketch is right. Tooling is a big factor. Air bends or Coining? The punch & die geometry also affect it. Wear on the tooling will affect it. Material type and thickness also contribute. Poorly centered tooling can screw up perfect calculations of length.

If you want a perfect job, cut test strips and adjust length until you get what you are looking for. If you are working with costly material this is a good idea. We always did this.