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spinrow
04-16-2008, 11:32 PM
I'm trying to clamp an 8" diameter 11" long round sump pump to my SB vertical mill table to remove 2 10-24 broken screws with an 1/8" end mill. Any suggestions as how to clamp it to table? Thanks Paul

Dawai
04-16-2008, 11:49 PM
Wooden cribbing? Stud connectors and clamps?

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v85/ibewgypsie/67flh_framebolt2.jpg
that's what I did here, way too big for the bridgeport tho, I had to cut off a drill about a inch and half long.

tattoomike68
04-17-2008, 12:00 AM
#1 a left hand drill bit is the ticket. Hog it in hard and screw it right out.

you can sharpen a bit left hand that will work from a right hand bit, it just takes practice.

Thats a macinist secret, dont tell anyone. :p

gzig5
04-17-2008, 01:32 AM
#1 a left hand drill bit is the ticket. Hog it in hard and screw it right out.

you can sharpen a bit left hand that will work from a right hand bit, it just takes practice.

Thats a macinist secret, dont tell anyone. :p

Very clever tip.

I was going to suggest one of those screw removing kits I've been seeing on TV during weekend sporting events. Has a left hand v-shaped drill/mill on one end and flip it over and use the LH extractor to drive out the screw. It looks pretty handy and is about $20 for a set but I think I'll wait till they hit the stores and save the S&H.
Or there is the old style easy out. Carbon bolts should drill out fairly easy if you get it started straight.

Greg

GKman
04-17-2008, 05:10 AM
If it's got any steel on it, weld something on it you can clamp to. As low as the forces are going to be, glue it to a plate with bondo (fender putty). It's a sump pump not the crown jewls.

David,
Is that a bottle of wildroot hair tonic next to the keyboard?

oldtiffie
04-17-2008, 05:53 AM
#1 a left hand drill bit is the ticket. Hog it in hard and screw it right out.

you can sharpen a bit left hand that will work from a right hand bit, it just takes practice.

Thats a macinist secret, dont tell anyone. :p

Thanks TT.

A fine idea and a good tip.

LH drills are a bit expensive and not always handy when you ned them - but what is?.

Any chance of posting a pic so that those that might not fully appreciate that what you can do can be done and is effective and made from a drill that most likely will be in the shop?

oldtiffie
04-17-2008, 05:54 AM
#1 a left hand drill bit is the ticket. Hog it in hard and screw it right out.

you can sharpen a bit left hand that will work from a right hand bit, it just takes practice.

Thats a macinist secret, dont tell anyone. :p

Thanks TT.

A fine idea and a good tip.

LH drills are a bit expensive and not always handy when you need them - but what is?.

Any chance of posting a pic so that those that might not fully appreciate that what you can do can be done and is effective and made from a drill that most likely will be in the shop?

snowman
04-17-2008, 10:04 AM
"just do it"

Often, too much time is spent fretting, when I can't figure out how to hold something on the mill, I set it up there are start grabbing random pieces of scrap, trying to figure out the most rigid way to hold it with "nothing".

Now, I have no clue how big your mill is, but I'd take a piece of 1/4 scrap plate, tack weld two pieces of angle on it, then use a couple clamps on it.

No welder? Make it from wood with drywall screws. Use a couple 1" nylon ratchet straps to hold the pipe to the wood, use a couple clamps and hold it to the table.

deltaenterprizes
04-17-2008, 10:22 AM
Left hand bits are not expensive ,Harbor Freight has a set of three that is reasonably priced also MSC has imports that are inexpensive too!

spinrow
04-17-2008, 02:53 PM
Thanks for the suggestions. My mill table is 9"x42". The sump pump is solid brass or bronze? I plan on strapping it in 2 places to the table with pieces of file under the straps or use pointed screws through the straps to keep it from slipping. I wish there was something I could place under the pump where it contacts the table to keep it from twisting. Maybe additional pieces of file? Paul

tattoomike68
04-17-2008, 09:08 PM
Thanks TT.

A fine idea and a good tip.

LH drills are a bit expensive and not always handy when you ned them - but what is?.

Any chance of posting a pic so that those that might not fully appreciate that what you can do can be done and is effective and made from a drill that most likely will be in the shop?

here is a pic of a right hand bit sharpend left hand, its not strong but will unscrew a broken bolt when you hog it in hard.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v488/miketattoo68/lhdrill.jpg

Scishopguy
04-17-2008, 09:43 PM
Paul...I used to have to fix Niskin bottles that the science boys used on the ship to take water samples. They are round and made of PVC pipe. I quickly learned that if you take a piece of aluminum channel that is about 2/3 of the width of the diameter of the pipe and bolt it to the mill table, the round will sit in it and you can clamp it with a strap clamp on either end. If you aren't doing any heavy cutting, you don't even need to clamp it. The web of the channel will hold it fast.

steve45
04-17-2008, 10:41 PM
Left hand bits are not expensive ,Harbor Freight has a set of three that is reasonably priced also MSC has imports that are inexpensive too!

I've got a set of those. Used them to drill out a stainless screw that was broken off in a JetSki. Worked GREAT! I'll never go back to E-Z Outs!

Peter S
04-18-2008, 07:21 AM
Sometimes you can clamp too-high jobs to the front or rear face of the mill table. Probably only works if you can swing the ram around to reach the job. I haven't done this to a round workpiece, but you could maybe use channel or angle iron welded to a plate clamped to the table, etc.

Also, some smaller drill presses have a table that can be rotated into vertical position which occasionaly helps. Use G-clamps or threaded rod and straps etc to clamp the workpiece.

Frank Ford
04-18-2008, 01:15 PM
Tatoomike -

THANKS so much for the left-hand sharpening tip. I read your post just before going out to my shop to work on an old Hardinge quick-acting cross slide I'm adapting to fit my little Rambold turret lathe.

Sure enough, there was a slightly submerged broken 10-32 screw in the casting, so I introduced an old 9/64" bit to Mr. BenchGrinder, and had the screw out in seconds!