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snowman
04-22-2008, 08:29 PM
Do planers have a clapper box like shapers do?

I'm looking at the pictures from NAMES and there is the hand planer on there, but I can't tell from the picture.

Also, what do you think the reason for dovetail ways on that machine is? It seems that all of the cutting forces would keep the bed pretty well set, with box ways only.

Michael Edwards
04-22-2008, 08:33 PM
Do planers have a clapper box like shapers do?

I'm looking at the pictures from NAMES and there is the hand planer on there, but I can't tell from the picture.

Also, what do you think the reason for dovetail ways on that machine is? It seems that all of the cutting forces would keep the bed pretty well set, with box ways only.

Yes they have a clapper box. It is clearly visible in the pics. On large planers, the table rides in some vee groves, the sheer weight of the table holds it down. Since that is such a small table and not much mass, they probably figured dovetails were the way to go.

ME

oldtiffie
04-22-2008, 09:05 PM
Yes they have a clapper box. It is clearly visible in the pics. On large planers, the table rides in some vee groves, the sheer weight of the table holds it down. Since that is such a small table and not much mass, they probably figured dovetails were the way to go.

ME

Agreed Michael.

The planer and shaper are really just variations of the same principle - as is the slotter.

The large-ish planer I used a long time ago had the male "Vee"s on the moving table and the mating(???) female vee-ways on the base. Both were very "substantial".

The ways have force-fed lubrication which I guess "lifted" the table during its stroking. There was a "bow wave" of oil ahead of the table as it moved and a small "stern wash" on the trailing way. The lube system was a full recovery and filtered recirculation system. The table, big as it was "moved" very "easily".

I'd guess that sort of "lube" system would not be necessary on the model planer under discussion.

Michael Moore
04-22-2008, 10:24 PM
A friend just built a new welding table, which included a largish (4'x 5' x 1.5" IIRC) steel plate top. He had that Blanchard ground and told the grinding shop that he wanted the sides very square/parallel/straight (he does some pretty high-end fab and machining work, and he's pretty picky about his tools).

He told me that they used a big old planer in the back of the facility to do the sides and things were impressively square/parallel/straight, and he's got the equipment and knowledge to judge that. He said that to look at it you'd figure the planer was basically scrap, with big score marks on the ways. I replied that with 5" or 6" V ways a few scratches or gouges probably didn't significantly reduce the bearing area. :)

It was nice to hear of another big old hunk of iron still pulling its (massive) weight in industry.

cheers,
Michael

toastydeath
04-22-2008, 10:48 PM
Planers have substantial lateral loads when you consider negative tooling and a 20-50 horsepower machine using a .060" or more stepover cutting more than an inch deep.

Alguy
04-23-2008, 02:10 AM
Last spring i went to an old shop the guy was 87, he was selling a few items and got my first look at a planer. It was converted from the over head shaft system of powering it, as was his drill press band saw it was kinda like step back in time.I have been back be but he is never been there.

pcarpenter
04-23-2008, 12:07 PM
One thing that dovetail ways allow for is a gib tapered in two dimensions that tighten in two dimensions and along the full bearing length, with only a single screw. Making and scraping in this gib and its matching pocket can be a bit more challenging, but adjusting can be done easily and simply with a single screwdriver in mere minutes.

Paul

kf2qd
04-23-2008, 12:52 PM
Large planers used a clapper box like a shaper - but the later ones used air to hold it up on the return stroke. Less likely to chip the carbide during the return stroke.