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View Full Version : Stripping and refinishing SB9 advice



Mattio
04-30-2008, 12:40 AM
Hi there
Now I am keen to get cleaning my beast up (I just bought a 1959 SB 9A...the $300 one). I have it mostly pulled apart but need a bit of help. I want to strip, clean and fully repaint before i use it.
What is the best way to pull apart headstock?? (is the an article somewhere on this). Does it even come apart?? Seems to be only one "split/seam" in bearing housing
Any good cleaning solutions to use??, one post mentioned boiling TSP as a cleaner and stripper.
Any advise will be thankfully received and faithfully applied.
cheers
Matt

speedy
04-30-2008, 01:10 AM
...glasses and gloves.
TSP is good; I use it myself. Bring it to the boil then simmer for a time.
Plenty of digital images assist the memory:) .

dp
04-30-2008, 01:28 AM
One of the most interesting threads I've stumbled upon:

http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/showthread.php?t=128005&highlight=south+bend

Mcruff
04-30-2008, 11:28 AM
I am in the process of putting mine back together after stripping it and doing some minor mods to it. I used a gel type paint remover I got at Lowes. It works great, brush it on, leave for 10 minutes and then remove with a small wire brush. 90% of it came off easy the other 10% needed a 2nd application. I then repainted it with a Valspar oil based paint from Lowes. I had it mixed to a machine grey color that I had on another piece of machinery.
This is the stripper I used:
http://www.wmbarr.com/Images/ProductImages/GKS3_6_R.jpg
As far as the spindle being removed:
Take off the chuck, remove the takeup nut on the rear of the spindle, remove the reverse gear assembly. Loosen (about 1 turn) the 2 bolts that are on the front of the head casting above the oil cups. Place a board or rag or something on the ways. Then with a rubber mallet or a piece of wood and metal hammer drive the spindle toward the tail stock. There is a drive key in the middle of the pulleys, once you make it past this mark the spindle will slide out quite easily, but up to this point it is usually tight. If you don't mind when you reassemble it, use a auto serpenting belt to aid with slippage and stop the use of belt dressing.
I tore mine apart after 3 years of use to paint it, convert it from a model "B" to an "A", add oil cups where there were open holes before and to put my Shumatech DRO's on and a chip pan under the whole thing. I should be finished hopefully this next weekend.

Good luck with your project.
I used the practical machinest page of Paula's to look at and get ideas before I started mine. There are several mods in the page's along with general info.

macona
04-30-2008, 11:58 AM
I went through my EE using Zep Purple and Aircraft Remover in an aerosol can to get the paint off. Worked real well. The Zep was the best stuff I tried.

Gloves on all of it though!

Forrest Addy
04-30-2008, 12:13 PM
Before you rush into a complete stip to bare metal, stop and assess the condition of the existing paint system. If it's sound and adherant, you're better off with a patch and prime approach. South Bend paint systems were well done back in the day. The castings were filled and faired in, primed and finish coated. No, it's not a two part spray urethane based abrasion resistant paint but it's pretty good even for today and well suited for finish coating with alkyd and oil paints.

Remeber this if you remember nothing else: a machine tool is not fine furniture. It's a piece of utilitatian shop equipment which if put to proper use will suffer paint abrasion in areas of chip wash. It's made to be used so don't get lost on makling it pretty.

Whiile you have the machine apart, conduct a step by step written survey of condition and accuracy. It will be invaluable for planning a step by step reconditioning.

As for dissembly of the spindle I can't help you because I've never dissembled a 9" SB. It is a very simple well designed machine. Isn't there a couple of bolted down bearing caps on either end? I think the caps unbolt and the spindle lifts out. Don't lose the placement and order of any shims you find. Take notes and lots of pictures as you go. Identify and bag items as you remove them.

Most mechanical work boils down to an ordered series of steps: survey, dissassembly, cleaning, assessment of conditions found, remedy, fit and reassemble, test. It's procedure, not rocket science.

S_J_H
04-30-2008, 01:38 PM
Forrest, I think this is Matt's new lathe- http://i291.photobucket.com/albums/ll290/mattiosteam/Lathe%202/IMG_0349.jpg

I may be climbing out on a limb here but I sort of doubt that is South Bend paint.:D

Boiling TSP works MUCH better than any stripper or parts cleaner.Put the nasty part in the pan and come back in 30 minutes or so and rinse clean. Goodbye paint, grease and hello clean metal. If it's really bad you might need to do it twice.
The problem of course will be on large parts that one can't fit into a big pan.So that method is a little limited to the smaller parts. But a big turkey pan will do just about everything but the bed and cast iron legs on a 9" South Bend.

The headstock on most SB 9's don't have removable top bearing caps. Remove the threaded adjusting nut on the rear and loosen up the bearing cap screws. Then you'll have to tap out the spindle towards the tail stock end with a hammer and a block of aluminum or brass placed at the rear of the spindle or you can fab up a puller. The bull gear is a press fit on the spindle and once you have it beyond that it will slide right out. Be very careful not to nick the bearings or spindle.

The above link to that thread in the P.M. south bend forum is a very good read.
Steve

S_J_H
04-30-2008, 01:52 PM
This is a pic of the spindle in my 9A. You can see the keyed area where the bull gear seats that Mcruff referred to. Once the bull gear is beyond that point it slides right out.
http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n48/S_J_H/southbend007.jpg

Steve

lane
04-30-2008, 09:39 PM
For paint stripping . I use a 55 gallon drum cit half fill with water and pore in 4 cans of lye. Tie parts on heavy wire and set in barrel. Check after a few hours rise parts off real good and ( DON`T GET any on you) that stuff will burn to the bone ask me I know. But for cleaning old iron nothing better and cheap. when you done you can spray what is left for weed killer and around border of yard and no weed eating for the next 2 years Plus flush some and it will clean out your drains. Just don`t get it on any thing you do not want dead.

Bill Pace
04-30-2008, 10:32 PM
Speaking of Lye.......

We recently did the rework on the big ole Peerless Bandsaw which was realllly grungy and the first thing we thought of was to use Lye. Well, after 3-4 stops and not finding it (at places where it would normally have been sold -- couple rural hardware stores and a rural grocery store, etc) we're about to think it might have been put on the 'banned' list?? Anybody tried to find some lately? Any luck?

Mattio
04-30-2008, 10:52 PM
Speaking of Lye.......

We recently did the rework on the big ole Peerless Bandsaw which was realllly grungy and the first thing we thought of was to use Lye. Well, after 3-4 stops and not finding it (at places where it would normally have been sold -- couple rural hardware stores and a rural grocery store, etc) we're about to think it might have been put on the 'banned' list?? Anybody tried to find some lately? Any luck?

Lye...in this neck of the woods anyway is monitored. It is one of the core ingredients of crystal meth. I'm on our fire department, so I get to know these things in case anyone is wondering. Go to a hardware store, True Value, Ace, in the US and Home Hardware in Canada, and special order it...it is quite available.

Matt

Mattio
04-30-2008, 10:57 PM
Thanks for the sound advice. My reasons for stripping were more for cleaning and getting familiar with the machine...while I am at it....give it a coat of paint...get rid of the John Deere look.

Matt



Before you rush into a complete stip to bare metal, stop and assess the condition of the existing paint system. If it's sound and adherant, you're better off with a patch and prime approach. South Bend paint systems were well done back in the day. The castings were filled and faired in, primed and finish coated. No, it's not a two part spray urethane based abrasion resistant paint but it's pretty good even for today and well suited for finish coating with alkyd and oil paints.

Remeber this if you remember nothing else: a machine tool is not fine furniture. It's a piece of utilitatian shop equipment which if put to proper use will suffer paint abrasion in areas of chip wash. It's made to be used so don't get lost on makling it pretty.

Whiile you have the machine apart, conduct a step by step written survey of condition and accuracy. It will be invaluable for planning a step by step reconditioning.

As for dissembly of the spindle I can't help you because I've never dissembled a 9" SB. It is a very simple well designed machine. Isn't there a couple of bolted down bearing caps on either end? I think the caps unbolt and the spindle lifts out. Don't lose the placement and order of any shims you find. Take notes and lots of pictures as you go. Identify and bag items as you remove them.

Most mechanical work boils down to an ordered series of steps: survey, dissassembly, cleaning, assessment of conditions found, remedy, fit and reassemble, test. It's procedure, not rocket science.

J Tiers
05-01-2008, 08:02 AM
Since that one has already got it's "school paint", it's too late.....

But most always, the original paint is tougher than most anything you can easily paint over it. it will often resist the lye treatment longer than many other paints.

Regular epoxy paint is pretty good though, it has held up well on machines here.

Don't get carried away painting though, you'd be better off to spend more time fixing than painting. Paint won't make it work better.