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Stepside
05-15-2008, 03:47 PM
A friend gave me a 12' Sears Model 101.28990 Metal Lathe. It is in pieces and I will rebuild it as time permits. So I started with the motor with the plan to proceed through the power train until I reached the headstock. The two-step sheave on the motor needed replacement. Does anyone have a similiar lathe and if so what are the diameters of the two sheaves? The motor is 1725 RPM. I have what is left of the original sheave and after looking at some of the issues with the lathe I am curious if the diameter is close to correct. I plan to make my own replacements. Thanks in advance.

Pete

Chipslinger
05-15-2008, 03:55 PM
Could be an Atlas.

3t-
05-15-2008, 05:56 PM
stepside

sounds like an Atlas or an Atlas/Craftsman. I have a couple of PDF files that are parts breakdowns and exploded diagrams that I would be happy to email you if you want. They are pretty informative. My QC54 10 inch had a bit of wobble in the large dual step wheel so for now I am using a "weld a pulley" with about a 9.5 in pitch. The speeds are fine as you can pretty much pick your speeds if you work backwards from the motor speed and the pulley size combos. Anything in the 9-10 inch range will give you reasonable speeds. I wont be running my Atlas to the 2000rpm range so I am not concerned with the exact factory combo of wheels.

Send an email address if you want the files.

Stepside
05-15-2008, 06:06 PM
Thanks for the quick replies. I have the owners manual. All it tells me is that it is a step sheave on the motor. Being lazy I was hoping someone had one and could just take a quick measure. The existing sheave that came with it was JBwelded to the motor and was "welded" crooked. The next sheave in the train has wobble also but no JB weld. It will get a rebore and a sleeve.

JCHannum
05-15-2008, 06:42 PM
That series of Craftsman lathes is the later model Atlas lathe with the 1/2" thick bed and other improvements. It is a good machine. I can't guess as to sheave sizes, but the steps were the same as the steps on the driven sheave so the same belt could be used between the two ratios. If the existing sheaves provide reasonable speeds, it should not be a problem extrapolating replacements. They usually used common sheaves available in most hardware stores.

kendall
05-15-2008, 07:14 PM
Recently got rid of my old 10 inch atlas, but from memory, the motor sheaves were on the order of 2.5 and 5 inch, right there in that range anyway with a 1/2:1 ratio on them.
I remember the smaller pulley on the countershaft was very close in size to the larger pulley on the motor as the belt was very close to parrellel in that speed range.

Ken.

Ernie
05-15-2008, 09:22 PM
I have that exact same model lathe. It is a Sears/Atlas and has the Craftsman Commercial name plate on the front of the headstock. And yes, the bed is 1/2" thick. The motor sheave size is 1 15/16" for the small step and 4 3/8" for the big step. Measurements were taken right at the outer rim.
Ernie

Stepside
05-16-2008, 02:20 PM
The measurements that Ernie sent matched the remains of the sheave that I have. So I went out and made one as I couldn't find one in the catalogs that I have. I also suspect the one I made from billet will out last one of the potmetal/zinc ones. Thanks again.

Pete

Chipslinger
05-16-2008, 03:39 PM
Or even Zamac.