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View Full Version : Very cool knife sharpening device.



DICKEYBIRD
05-18-2008, 07:26 AM
I've been searching the web for endmill sharpening stuff and ran across this little video of a blade sharpening device that will have you saying "Now why didn't I think of that!"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLggLhpQeCI&feature=related

Swarf&Sparks
05-18-2008, 08:18 AM
WTF is a "15 degree microbevel per side" ?

perhaps it's a clever device designed to seperate you from your $ or

It's just another sharpening jig.

Sweep that in an arc, it will hone the edge in an arc.
Nice if that's what you want, but if you want a straight edge on a guillotine blade, frinstance, it aint gonna happen.

If you just want nice sharp kitchen knives, buy a water stone (or better, a diamond) and a leather strop, and practise.

I do believe there was a recent thread relating to just this subject.

deltaenterprizes
05-18-2008, 08:43 AM
There is already a production version of this called a Lansky sharpener

Alistair Hosie
05-18-2008, 08:57 AM
The Tormek is very good for me I use it all the time for woodturning chisels.Alistair

Swarf&Sparks
05-18-2008, 08:59 AM
Yes Alistair, I have one.
But that's a wet stone grinder, not a honing jig.

Frank Ford
05-18-2008, 10:15 AM
Interesting, particularly because I hadn't known about the Lansky Sharpener.

But, that was a long 6 minute video - long enough to make me wonder if I'd want to make, store, or even use such a rig. I think most of us would have been able to sharpen the cleaver, cut up and start cooking our Kung Pao Chicken in that length of time.

He did get the thing sharp, and he gave us a nice demo showing how much harder it is to cut paper across the grain. . .

Carld
05-18-2008, 10:19 AM
I don't think it would hone in an arc as the hone plate pivots and would lay flat and follow the blade. As with any hand operation you would have to be careful of how you apply pressure and sharp edges.

It looks like a good idea and as easy as the design is you could build your own easily.

Swarf&Sparks
05-18-2008, 10:29 AM
Fair 'nuff Carl, to each his own.
Personally, I reckon the construction time would be better used practising with a stone/strop/steel :D

That's a skill that will stay for a lifetime, even when a jig is lost.

ProGunOne
05-18-2008, 12:18 PM
Looks like a very similar system: http://www.edgeproinc.com/

Swarf&Sparks
05-18-2008, 12:24 PM
Yup Progun, that came up in the recent thread re kitchen knives.
For the price of that jig, you could keep yourself in a lifetime supply of solingen steel. :eek:

JBL37
05-18-2008, 12:54 PM
DICKEYBIRD: watching the video and it reminded me of the shear sharpener sitting on the shelf in the shop. It was acquired in the early seventies. Worked fairly well for barber shop scissors. Jim
http://home.att.net/~itemforsale/shear_sharpner.jpg

Swarf&Sparks
05-18-2008, 01:00 PM
Apropos of bugger-all (and apologies to the OP) but I used to make beer money sharpening shears for kevlar and carbon fibre.
Most of the local, big-time, tooling shops wouldn't touch em.
Secret is, just get as close to a right-angle as possible, while leaving a cutting edge.

Maybe help someone, someday.

BobWarfield
05-18-2008, 01:03 PM
I like it. If I cared about sharpening a bunch of knives often, it'd be easy enough to make.

Cheers,

BW

macona
05-18-2008, 05:38 PM
I picked up one of those tormeks with a bunch of accessories at goodwill for $60 a few months ago. They do work nice. Especially for touching up HSS bits.

This guys sharpener is nothing new.

Ian B
05-19-2008, 01:59 AM
This thing won't sharpen in an arc; what it will do is it'll give you a different angle along the length of the blade. More obtuse in the middle, acuter at the ends. Probably doesn't matter if you're just sharpening a cleaver to hack through a lump of meat.

Wish I had enough workshop space for something like that, mine's full of junk :-(

Ian

Your Old Dog
05-19-2008, 06:06 AM
Lansky was from Buffalo. His knife sharpener hit the market about the time of the knife collecting craze. He did very well with it and then sold off the rights if I remember correctly. At one point, I thought he had saturated his market because ads for his sharpener were in every book or catalog where knives were mentioned. His original kit contained something like 5 stones on rods. You gave the knife a few licks with each stone and in no time the knife was sharp or in cases of carbon blades, scary sharp.

Ian B
05-19-2008, 08:44 AM
YOD,

You raise an interesting point; can carbon steel blades be sharpened sharper than stainless steel ones? How about high speed steel? Which holds the better edge? What's the science behind it?

No doubt this has been discussed to the n'th degree on the various knife BBS's, but I don't frequent those...

Ian

Your Old Dog
05-19-2008, 09:11 AM
YOD,

You raise an interesting point; can carbon steel blades be sharpened sharper than stainless steel ones? How about high speed steel? Which holds the better edge? What's the science behind it?

No doubt this has been discussed to the n'th degree on the various knife BBS's, but I don't frequent those...

Ian

I made a few hundred hunting knives over 20 years ago. I made them in stainless and in carbon steel. I much prefer the carbon steel but the customers all wanted a worry free stainless blade. For my money, give a carbon blade any day of the week. I don't mind oiling it to keep it clean just like I do my guns and they may not hold an edge as long but they are easier to sharpen. I have no use for 6M2 or ceramic blades either !!

The actions on stainless revolvers are not as butter smooth as the action on carbon steel arms. If you close your eyes you can feel the difference as to whats in your hands on double action.