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aostling
05-18-2008, 11:04 PM
was running a drill press in the Hewlett-Packard machine shop, but that was only for a day. You will have no trouble topping that.

mochinist
05-18-2008, 11:11 PM
I worked in a melon packing shed for two summers when I was a teen, besides the head farmer I think I was the only English speaking person out of a couple hundred, it sucked pretty bad but the money was good compared to my friends working fast food.

3t-
05-18-2008, 11:24 PM
Hauling liquified or semi liquified pig s@#T for 8 - 10 hours a day during the summer 85-105 degrees outside. Sometimes with a skid loader sometimes with a shovel. Into the spreader...spread it on the field...back for another laod. If it was liquid enough you had to dump your loader just right or it might splash a few gallons right back over the side of the loader into your lap. Sometimes dead pigs and all went out in the haul. Maggots up to 1 foot thick if you stepped in the wrong place. You always wore knee high rubber boots or you had "things" wriggling in your sock all day:eek: Best part...$3.25 per hour, this was back in the early 80's so was way underpaid by any standard.

Nuf about that...Like dad always said "Builds Character, makes you appreciate what you got...:rolleyes:

Boy, the things my kids will never experience!

lenord
05-18-2008, 11:26 PM
Worst job I ever had was as a tech. in the street department (I was 18). I was in storm sewers cleaning them out. I was at the dump cleaning the debris fences, in the winter. I shoveled asphalt in the summer. I lasted 8 months and was promoted to a delivery job.
Would not change a thing, beats basic in the marines.

Lenord

loose nut
05-18-2008, 11:43 PM
Hauling liquified or semi liquified pig s@#T for 8 - 10 hours a day during the summer 85-105 degrees outside. Sometimes with a skid loader sometimes with a shovel. Into the spreader...spread it on the field...back for another laod. If it was liquid enough you had to dump your loader just right or it might splash a few gallons right back over the side of the loader into your lap. Sometimes dead pigs and all went out in the haul. Maggots up to 1 foot thick if you stepped in the wrong place. You always wore knee high rubber boots or you had "things" wriggling in your sock all day:eek: Best part...$3.25 per hour, this was back in the early 80's so was way underpaid by any standard.

Nuf about that...Like dad always said "Builds Character, makes you appreciate what you got...:rolleyes:

Boy, the things my kids will never experience!

OK, you win!

mochinist
05-18-2008, 11:45 PM
Hauling liquified or semi liquified pig s@#T for 8 - 10 hours a day during the summer 85-105 degrees outside. Sometimes with a skid loader sometimes with a shovel. Into the spreader...spread it on the field...back for another laod. If it was liquid enough you had to dump your loader just right or it might splash a few gallons right back over the side of the loader into your lap. Sometimes dead pigs and all went out in the haul. Maggots up to 1 foot thick if you stepped in the wrong place. You always wore knee high rubber boots or you had "things" wriggling in your sock all day:eek: Best part...$3.25 per hour, this was back in the early 80's so was way underpaid by any standard.

Nuf about that...Like dad always said "Builds Character, makes you appreciate what you got...:rolleyes:

Boy, the things my kids will never experience!Uggh my dad raised pigs and it was always my job to catch the young ones for shots and catrations etc, the stink they put on you is hard to get off with anything short of straight gasoline.:(

Tim Clarke
05-19-2008, 12:04 AM
Well, there are a few nasty things about the job that I still have after 29 years. I still work at the local garbage company. The most miserable, without any doubt is welding patches in the hopper of a garbage wagon. patch over the top of another patch. The juice gets trapped in between layers and sizzles when you weld on yet another repair. OOOOHYA, smells SOOO good.

TC

Evan
05-19-2008, 01:43 AM
I had many crappy jobs early on ranging from working in a paper egg carton factory to changing tires to cleaning rest rooms.

But, the worst of all was the 23 years I spent working for Xerox. It wasn't always that way. When I started it was a good job for a good company with rapid advances in responsibility and pay grade. I was very good at my work and it suited my individualistic tendencies since the job requires one to nearly always work without supervision.

I started in 1975 and it paid well up through the middle of the 1980's. Then an insidious trend developed. The emphasis changed as did Xerox's position in the marketplace. The competition from Japan was intense and Xerox wasn't keeping up. They struggled to catch up and in doing so the accountants began to run the company. For the first time a vice president of Service Operations was appointed that had no background in the service organization. Workloads were slowly ratcheted upward and pay scales stagnated. As the 80's became the 90's the it only grew worse. General moral among the work force began to plummet and the company began to divest divisions to "concentrate on core business", meaning they were bleeding money so fast they couldn't count it. Through the 90's I averaged less than 2% increase in wages per year, less than the inflation rate. At the same time my workload grew from an average of 1.2 heads to as high as 2.0 and that was according to the company's method of counting it. For the last 6 to 7 years I consistently was responsible for two service territories in towns separated by 75 miles as well as all types of equipment scattered across an area of about 25,000 square miles.

As I struggled to keep up with this the working environment deteriorated. Xerox dismissed most of the service managers with the result that the span of control changed from one manager for every 20 to 30 people to 3 managers for 350 people in this province. It meant that it was impossible to get help with matters outside of your job when requested to do so by a customer, such as a billing problem. At the same time the general tone in management/employee relations deteriorated so far that even low and middle tier management complained freely in front of people like myself, the field reps. In 1997 the company found itself against the wall financially with no more than a couple of months operating capital remaining, perhaps only weeks left. At the same time near the end of 1997 I was informed that one of the people on my service team (a fiction since I was never involved in the actual team because of distance) had been promoted to Vancouver and his position would not be filled. I was expected to help fill the empty slot by driving an additional 50 miles further north with the resulting deterioration of my ability to provide service to my regular customer base, many of whom I had known for as long as two decades.

That finally was for me the last straw. There were many others piled on one at a time that I haven't mentioned here. On the first working day of 1998 I informed Xerox that I would be resigning my position. I e-mailed, faxed, left voice mail and sent registered mail to five different people in the company explaining this and giving five weeks notice because of the difficulty of replacing me in this territory. This wasn't out of consideration for Xerox but for my customers.

I also informed them I would be driving to Vancouver in three weeks and would stop in the main office for an exit interview and whatever else they deemed necessary such as turning over assets such as computers, spare parts etc.

When I arrived in Vancouver in three weeks time the first person I visited was one of the remaining service managers. When he saw me he asked what I was doing in Vancouver. Apparently he hadn't bothered to check his mail and neither had any of the other four people I had notified. Either that or they didn't take my resignation seriously even though I had never before so much as mentioned it as a possibility let alone use it as some sort of threat.

They now only had two weeks to find a replacement. In all, I ended up finishing work without an exit interview, without signing any confidentiality or non-disclosure agreements and without any form of termination review or even accounting of company assets.

It took Xerox six weeks to cut my last check and 3 months to pay out my very considerable profit sharing and pension plan. It took an additional 3 months of me pestering them and finally threatening small claims court action to have my final expense report paid.

radish1us
05-19-2008, 02:46 AM
Well, there are a few nasty things about the job that I still have after 29 years. I still work at the local garbage company. The most miserable, without any doubt is welding patches in the hopper of a garbage wagon. patch over the top of another patch. The juice gets trapped in between layers and sizzles when you weld on yet another repair. OOOOHYA, smells SOOO good.

TC

Been there, done that, just read the above and it reminded me of that delicious aroma, boy, it was so thick, you could chew on it, now I have to go and puke.`

Tuckerfan
05-19-2008, 05:16 AM
Meet my supervisor: Pete Puma. (http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?p=99974#post99974)

Alistair Hosie
05-19-2008, 06:18 AM
When I was young I once worked in a sawmill stacking timbers from morning til night in all weathers outside.Man it was boring boring drive you crazy.Alistair

Chipslinger
05-19-2008, 06:28 AM
Cleaning/ repairing the inside of a rendering cooker, Upside was finding all the cow magnets and keeping them.

Rustybolt
05-19-2008, 07:52 AM
The one I have now. It isn't the work so much, although 'good enough for our purposes' isn't a standard I'm used to working with. The boss and his family are the reasons I hate the place. There simply isn't enough time to into the whole thing now. maybe later.

Metalmelter
05-19-2008, 08:11 AM
Been there, done that, just read the above and it reminded me of that delicious aroma, boy, it was so thick, you could chew on it, now I have to go and puke.`


LMAO !!! I almost spit my coffee out !!

wierdscience
05-19-2008, 09:05 AM
Worst job?There have been so many.

I guess near the top was shingling helper,100lb bundles of tar shingles lugged up on the roof in 100+ weather.

Also changing out head rollers and drives on concrete conveyor lines,100+ heat plus cemet dust:(

Peter N
05-19-2008, 09:17 AM
The worst job I ever had was from early '96 to late '98 when I was group MD for 3 small companies in the south of england, Spafax, Kendall Hyde, and a holding company.
I was just 36, getting the biggest salary I ever earned (and still haven't matched), big company car, credit cards, and a fat expense account.

However, I reported in to a chairman who was the biggest arsehole in Christendom, and 3 years of stress and sleepless nights took their toll, especially with a very young family.
Money and power aren't everything.

Peter

loose nut
05-19-2008, 09:43 AM
II started in 1975 and it paid well up through the middle of the 1980's. Then an insidious trend developed. The emphasis changed as did Xerox's position in the marketplace. The competition from Japan was intense and Xerox wasn't keeping up. They struggled to catch up and in doing so the accountants began to run the company. For the first time a vice president of Service Operations was appointed that had no background in the service organization. Workloads were slowly ratcheted upward and pay scales stagnated. As the 80's became the 90's the it only grew worse. General moral among the work force began to plummet and the company began to divest divisions to "concentrate on core business", meaning they were bleeding money so fast they couldn't count it. Through the 90's I averaged less than 2% increase in wages per year, less than the inflation rate. At the same time my workload grew from an average of 1.2 heads to as high as 2.0 and that was according to the company's method of counting it. For the last 6 to 7 years I consistently was responsible for two service territories in towns separated by 75 miles as well as all types of equipment scattered across an area of about 25,000 square miles.

.
I'm afraid that this is the attitude of most companies now, the one I work for is rolling in profits and they still work the same way.

Worst job, if you weren't born rich you got it.

QSIMDO
05-19-2008, 10:13 AM
Ironically I worked in the old Hendey factory for a pillow manufacturer who occupied one of the buildings.
I was a pillow stuffer in a room equivalent to a tall meat locker where I'd slip a empty pillow case over a blower outlet, tromp on a peddle and kapok was blown into the pillow case...my mouth, nose, eyes, ears...I'm not even sure if OSHA had been established yet.
Only benefit was a real "Mrs. Robinson" of a co-worker. ;)

daryl bane
05-19-2008, 10:18 AM
How about sandblasting septic pits and propane tanks in rural Georgia in the summer.

snowman
05-19-2008, 10:26 AM
Academia

I worked like a dog, then when my manager returned to India (homeland) for a month and didn't pay me, I took another job elsewhere to pay the bills. When my manager returned, I showed up to remove my tools and he held them hostage until I finished my project, even though I had no contractual obligation to do any work for them. Complaints to the dean went unanswered.

When I was finally allowed to remove my tools, three months later, I took well over ten grand in other equipment that I had built out of my personal materials stock and never been reimbursed for. (the materials were worth $500 at most, the time I had in to them was valuable)

When contacted a month later when they realized what was missing, I told them I'd be happy to talk to them in court. They decided it wasn't that important. The best part, all of the prints were in my lab notebook, which had ZERO dimensions in it. When he called me on that, I told him to look at the lower left hand corner of the page and note that he had signed off on my notebook at the time. When he asked for the cad versions, I told him that I would be more than happy to sell him back the drawings, since they were done on my own time with my computer and my personal cad package.

I learned a lot from that job.

Mike Hunter
05-19-2008, 02:25 PM
Back in my college days, did a short stint in a salvage yard; used a cutting torch to cut up air conditioners, semi trucks and small airplanes for scrap.

All components were suppose to be purged of gasses fluids etc… ya right. Freon when heated & exposed to flame turns into phosgene gas (can you say WWI chemical warfare) … terrible headache… makes you want to puke. Hit an airplane wing with fuel still in it….surprise surprise surprise… of course the boss was not amused to have a flaming plane in his yard.

dilligaf
05-19-2008, 02:55 PM
worst job I ever worked at was a galvanizing plant. If the parts were still wet the zinc would explode and if they had dirt on them the flux on the zinc would catch fire. We galvanized communicatiion towers and it was like a cannon every time.

Jason

John R
05-19-2008, 05:48 PM
When I was about 14 I had a part time job as soda jerk and short order cook. I was good at it and liked doing the job but some of the customers were really rotten people who made my second job my worst(first was cutting grass). Eventually I went to university , became an engineer and life has been good .
John R

Walter
05-19-2008, 05:54 PM
Worst portion of a job for me was welding up roto rooter tanks... honeywagons.

worst job in general was working an arch and truss assembly table, kicked sh*t outta my knees and legs

steverice
05-19-2008, 06:05 PM
I was in the army

john hobdeclipe
05-19-2008, 06:35 PM
Washing cars in the winter was not fun.

Working in the poultry processing plant was definitely not fun...on my feet on a concrete floor 10 - 12 hrs/day putting ice cold dead chickens in boxes. This was a summer job during my high school years...first day on the job we ran fryers for 8 hours, then big heavy baking hens for 2 hours. I never wanted to see another dam chicken for the rest of my life. Got home dead tired and hungry. Mom had cooked CHICKEN! And I ate it and everything else in sight.

But the worst job ever was just a two day deal at a Bassett furniture factory. One day I was given the job of inspecting several thousand sofa feet that had been purchased from an outside vendor and had some quality issues. I was given my instructions and examples of good and bad product, then spent two days in a trailer, in a North Carolina July, sorting through these turnings. Wouldn't have been so bad, but they gave me an "assistant" who was totally worthless, disgusting, never bathed in his life, smelled like a nest of skunks, and whistled, constantly, hour after hour, only two notes.

In retrospect, I think they put him in there with me as motivation, to assure that I got the job done quickly. It worked.

laddy
05-19-2008, 06:38 PM
Teaching anatomy at Georgetown University med school. Bummer!!! Smelled bad and gave you the crepes!

John Stevenson
05-19-2008, 07:46 PM
The worst job I ever had was from early '96 to late '98 when I was group MD for 3 small companies in the south of england, Spafax, Kendall Hyde, and a holding company.
I was just 36, getting the biggest salary I ever earned (and still haven't matched), big company car, credit cards, and a fat expense account.

However, I reported in to a chairman who was the biggest arsehole in Christendom, and 3 years of stress and sleepless nights took their toll, especially with a very young family.
Money and power aren't everything.

Peter

Too right Peter,
I had a decent job building special purpose machines for the piano industry, basically I was left to get on with it and use my own idea's.

Then I got made up to manager, then manager over 4 shops, all bull****, meetings and paperwork.

I think telling the Engineering Manager he was a cunt in a production meeting was a bad career move :D :D

.

bhjones
05-19-2008, 07:51 PM
I've worked factory trawlers and crab boats out of Dutch Harbor a few times, I've been the new guy on plenty of landscaping and construction sites and I've done some diving in zero visibility water fixing the plumbing connections between a houseboat and the dock (the were flushing into Portage Bay, Seattle for God knows how long).

There have been a number of hard, dirty jobs that I tried out in my youth but the worst job I've ever did was delivering Sheetrock to job sites, big job sites. Lots and lots and lots of 5/8" fire rated sheets (along with all the other kinds. that 5/8 was just extra heavy) being delivered up three to four flights of stairs.

I made it about 2 weeks before I called it quits. My hands where hamburger and I was starting to have trouble standing up straight. There were some rugged men doing that job.

Rustybolt
05-19-2008, 08:03 PM
The one I have now. It isn't the work so much, although 'good enough for our purposes' isn't a standard I'm used to working with. The boss and his family are the reasons I hate the place. There simply isn't enough time to into the whole thing now. maybe later.


There was a reason they didn't show me the shop at the time of my interviews. It was a dungeon. Half the lights were burned out or nonworking and all the stock was laid out out on the floor. Nobody had ever cleaned the cut off saw. There was a pile of cut offs and metal chips up to the tray. After nearly breaking my ankle, I built a stock rack and got all the stuff off the floor. My bosses only comment was,"What did you do that for?" I get that a lot when I try to improve things.
The boss,40s, gets in some real screaming matches with his father,70s. On more than one occaision I had to physically step between the two. Neither know very much about machining, but they are very quick to ridicule if the see a mistake. Their idea of accuracy is a tape measure. Which is fine because none of the lathes can hold size for more than an inch in any given axis. I chased a thread without a die and from the look on his face you'd think I came from outer space. The mills aren't any better, except one nearly new BP. The vertical bandsaw, the shear, and the brake are all stuff his dad pulled out of a dumpster, and in the same condition too. Needless to say I'm looking around, but there isn't much need for someone my age.
Sigh.

ERBenoit
05-19-2008, 08:05 PM
I have only had five jobs (including my current) over twenty years, and only left two (they closed) by my choice for something better.

Though not really the "worst" job to have, just the principles of the employer made it the worst I've ever had.

After the hardware store that I worked in during trade school folded up after roughly 100 years in business, I went to work for an "aquantiance". Property maintenance "contractor". I was given assignment of painting a deck. Temperature was above freezing, barely. I told him this coat of paint wouldn't last. He said I know, I'll charge them again in the spring to paint the deck again.

I "worked" for this a**hole for about two hours. He's no longer in the property maintenance business, but he's still an a**hole.

john hobdeclipe
05-19-2008, 08:38 PM
I think telling the Engineering Manager he was a cunt in a production meeting was a bad career move :D :D

.

Hah! Sounds familiar. Telling the Assistant Plant Manager (in front of several of my co-workers) that we could all get a lot more done if he would only lock himself in his office and play with himself all day didn't exactly enhance my "career."

moldmonkey
05-19-2008, 09:47 PM
I was often given the literal s***-detail during Desert Storm. The latrines were half 55-gallon barrels which had to be burned down to ash before being buried. Dump some diesel in, let it burn, stir and repeat. That was a nasty smell that stayed with you.

Dad would take in yearling steers as I was growing up. The custom is if one dies is to cut the brand out and save it for the owner to prove you didn't steal/lose it. We checked once a week which is a long time for the carcass to ripen come August. The horse didn't like it either and it would be hard to get them close and they would be constantly jerking on the reins.

Cleaning hydraulic reservoirs on injection molding machines. Always a dirty job but one had started to rust on the ceiling so we had to crawl in and wire wheel it off. Laying on your back on oil soaked rags, breathing rust, hot, half claustrophobic and then my "buddy" decides to close the hatch on me.:mad: :)

kf2qd
05-19-2008, 10:07 PM
Plastic injection molding shop. Managers all thought their purpose in life was to prove they were more imprtant than any one else. Employees were just trash to be used to massage their egos.

Large .com mail order company. employees were just throw aways. Was hired to do a job, but was never allowed to do it. then they screwed witht he hours - just because they could...

johnc
05-19-2008, 11:12 PM
I used to work in an automotive machine shop and we had a brake shoe arcer. The idea being that you could match the shoe radius to the brake drum diameter after it was turned oversize. Now this was 20 yrs ago and I can't say for sure that asbestos was involved but was pretty sure that the resulting dust was not healthy. I finally took some side-cutters and snipped the power cord. My boss spouted off that the former machinist used to arc hundreds of shoes, I then reminded him that he also died of lung cancer.

Liger Zero
05-19-2008, 11:38 PM
Given the economy up here and the "temp mafia" mindset of most employers I've gone through more jobs in 10 years than most of you have in a lifetime. I'm not the only one either. Alot of us skilled workers are getting yo-yo'd around and there is not a damn thing we can do about it.

Top three would be: Weco hired me and "trained" me for three weeks and claimed "economic growth" then cut me loose and hired another person to train. Mother****ing "Empire Zones!" Thats a rant for another day. Hey they got me interested in press-brake work. Now I own one of my own. :)

Webster Tool And Die (VI Mfg) brought me on as a pressbrake operator but I never so much as touched a brake or a punchpress because in the words of the forman I "looked too young" to operate anything safely. Folks I don't own a car because I simply can't afford one on temp-wages. He got it in his head that I didn't own a car I was 14 years old and wasn't old enough to operate a machine. I just turned 38 in February... while working there.

Last one would be Trident, more or less the same story. I worked there for two weeks, they took me off the bloody Timesaver because I wasn't experienced enough (20+ years in industry with at least seven of that in sheetmetal!) to "operate the machines safely," and I was told by the forman that when I turned 20 I would be evaluated on the "more complex" machines like the Timesaver but until then I was to content myself doing cleaning and shipping and other "labor" tasks.

---honestly I wonder why companies bother to interview new employees if the formen/supervisors are just going to do whatever the hell they want regardless of what papers are signed at hiring.



It is places and situations like these that make you appreciate the good shops even more. The place I'm at now I can honestly say it's one of the best metal shops I've ever worked at, and it's honestly better than many of the plastic companies I set foot in either for work or for interviews. We're not the richest fastest growing company out there but we're trying. The owner actually listens and considers ideas from the workers... most of the time we simply can't afford drastic changes but simple things like building a fixture or organizing the tool racks... these things get noticed and commented on. :)

gellfex
05-19-2008, 11:53 PM
Saw an ad for a job at a "lamp refinishing" shop, and thought if might be fun for a college summer job, I had worked in a custom brass decorative hardware shop and thought this was similar. What I didn't know is that they had a contract to paint military diesel primer pumps. So instead of polishing brass and wiring lamps, I spent my days with a spray gun of enamel in front of a hood. But they refused to give me a respirator! There was only one and the other guy got it. Oh, and though I had to hold the pieces while spraying, they didn't have gloves either. I was told to dip my hands in the vat of paint stripper! Crap that stung. The owner was fond of talking about his days at GM and the ridiculous workers safety requirements. Cap that with the usual old alcoholic geezers taunting "the kid", and I lasted 3 weeks.

I filled out the rest of the summer driving around the Pittsburgh area hustling portrait coupons at cheap department stores. But it was 1982, and the economy sucked. I remember one woman walking up to my display of photos on cheesy wooden plaques for $10.95 and saying "oh,. they're lovely, but my husband has been laid off for 2 years now...." I was luck to make minimum wage.

Well, I've been self employed in the entertainment industry since 86. I love that people come to me to solve their problems, not ordering me to build their own wrong solution to a problem. I was always a lousy employee.

madman
05-20-2008, 12:20 AM
Been so many but the last one hand tapping 42 mm tapped holes kind off really sucked big time,

grannygear
05-20-2008, 05:30 AM
Early 1980's, summer job just before senior year of high school.

Me and some buddies are sent into a factory in St.Louis, MO, in the middle of July. Plant is shutdown for maintenance for two weeks, owned by Lever Brothers as a soap factory.

We have to go into the factory and change out all the cloth filter bags on the soap processing equipment. Concentrated All Detergent. 1,700 filter bags.

The bags are inside metal chambers, chambers filled with the choking fumes of perfumed, alkaline soap powder. Detergent in your nose, in your eyes, in your mouth. Detergent that would mix with your sweat (it's summertime in St. Louis, and you're locked in a coffin) and form a caustic river of pain on your flesh.

I still have scars. I went blind for a day. I can't smell All detergent to this day.

But we did make a lot of money, for dumb high school kids. Bought my first motorcycle, and the rest kept me in beers for most of the school year, so it wasn't all bad.

DickDastardly40
05-20-2008, 08:00 AM
I think telling the Engineering Manager he was a cunt in a production meeting was a bad career move :D :D
.

Funny how in the Service that term can be used almost as a term of endearment, whereas in Civvie street it's a killing insult.



Boy, the things my kids will never experience!


Possibly the truest thing I have read all week.

Al

oldtiffie
05-20-2008, 08:24 AM
I think telling the Engineering Manager he was a cunt in a production meeting was a bad career move


Funny how in the Service that term can be used almost as a term of endearment, whereas in Civvie street it's a killing insult.

..............................................

Al

Thanks Al - I needed that!!.

All too true in the OZ Navy, Army and Air Force too -and in much of the population!! It all depends on the circumstances, context and the inflection put on it!!

Bast**d is another.

It was standing joke in the Navy at least that the Commanding Officer was "fair and just" with his attitude to and punishment of those of whom he was in charge - ie "A fair c**t and just a bastard"!!! CO offended? No way!!

When I was a Apprentice in the Tool Room (about 1956/7) I worked with a great "Brit" tradesman from Yorkshire in the UK. He was always impeccably dressed and mannered as he was proud of his craft. Very quiet an not easily "stirred" at all - with one exception- the word "bastard". He said that in Yorkshire that was just about the ultimate insult and "fighting words". He loved OZ with a passion too, but could not get used to everything and everybody being a good/bad, big/small, mean/generous, rich/poor .... etc "bastard". I used it frequently and it wore poor old Ernie down a bit. He could not get used to people calling their seniors other than "Mister" and certainly not by their name or "nick" names - and me as an Apprentice doing it too and the Seniors not minding at all "threw" him too.

In one of those rare quiet times in the Tool-Room poor old Ernie "lost it" when something went wrong - and we all heard him say "F**king bast**d what-ever". We were all stunned into total silence and awe. And then the cheering and clapping started!! Poor old Ernie just could not believe he said it!! Ernie used those terms a bit more often as time wore on - he was "Australian-ised".

Swarf&Sparks
05-20-2008, 09:45 AM
Hehe,
you can spell it "cur" as long as you pronounce it "sir"

Lew Hartswick
05-20-2008, 11:19 AM
In terms of nasty smell etc. I havent seen any refrence to the
"grease traps" in any military mess hall. :-)
...lew...

bhjones
05-20-2008, 02:18 PM
This youthful logic is how I always came into doing many ****ty jobs. "You want me to do what? For how much pay? Yeah, that sounds good."

That said, the weather in the Pacific Northwest were I grew up wasn't the humid pressure cooker so many other parts of the U.S. are in August. I was spared that at least.


I still have scars. I went blind for a day. I can't smell All detergent to this day.

But we did make a lot of money, for dumb high school kids. Bought my first motorcycle, and the rest kept me in beers for most of the school year, so it wasn't all bad.