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TexasKnifeMaker
05-20-2008, 06:07 PM
I currently have 2 books that I picked up just to see if I was interested. If you have particpated in any of my other 'new guy' threads about which lathe and mill to get - many thanks. Now, I need to prepare to learn how to use them.

I have The Home Machinist Handbook by Brinery (mainly aimed at Sherline owners) and How to Run a Lathe - from Southbend (1942) and reprinted by Lindsay Publications.

I am considering Milling: A Complete Course and Lathework: A Complete Course by Harold Hall.

I would eventually like to learn about making muzzle-loading pistols to go along with the bowie knives I currently make.

Any suggestions on good books for the beginner will be appreciated.

Jacque Eagon
Rowlett, Texas

aostling
05-20-2008, 06:15 PM
I've benefited from Machine Shop Essentials, by Frank Marlow. It is one of the best-illustrated books on this subject. Here is a link which will allow you to look at some of its pages. Check out the glowing reviews.
http://www.amazon.com/Machine-Shop-Essentials-Questions-Answers/dp/0975996304/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1211321245&sr=8-1

hornluv
05-20-2008, 06:50 PM
These really helped me when I was starting and I still like reading them:

Machine Shop Practice
By: Karl Moltrect
Pub: Industrial Press, 1981
ISBN: 0831111267 (Vol. 1), 0831111321 (Vol. 2)
$20.95 (Vol. 1), $21.95 (Vol. 2)

Machine Shop Training Course
By: Franklin Day Jones
Pub: Industrial Press, 1964
ISBN: 0831110392 (Vol. 1), 0831110406 (Vol. 2)
$18.95 (Vol. 1), $19.95 (Vol. 2)

The ISBN is the international standard book number. You should be able to plug that number into Amazon or give it to any bookseller and they'll be able to find it for you. Both books run the gamut of manual machining. As far as learning to make muzzle loaders, if you learn the processes you can do on the different machines, you can make whatever you want. It's all just metalworking after that.

lazlo
05-20-2008, 07:21 PM
The 2 volume Moltrecht set is the Machine Shop Bible, but it's really technical -- depends on what you're looking for. Personally, it's my favorite, but I like to make things complicated :)

Henry Burghardt's Machine Tool Operation is a Vo-Ed book that is a lot more approachable and down-to-earth, and far less technical than Moltrecht.

Another, modern machine shop Vo-Ed textbook that I really like is Richard Kibbe's Machine Tool Practices. The previous two books are 30 and 50 years old, respectively. Kibbe actually has an 8th Edition from 2005 (do people still teach shop class? :)).

smiller6912
05-20-2008, 07:36 PM
I highly recommend: "Machine Shop Trade Secrets: A Guide to Manufacturing Machine Shop Practices" by James Harvey

http://www.amazon.com/Machine-Shop-Trade-Secrets-Manufacturing/dp/0831132272

Also, I think that a class at your local community collage would be a great "hands on" learning experience.

TexasKnifeMaker
05-20-2008, 11:34 PM
- - - - - As far as learning to make muzzle loaders, if you learn the processes you can do on the different machines, you can make whatever you want. It's all just metalworking after that.

I was hoping to find a book or diagrams that show how the old single-shot cap'n'ball or flintlocks work on the inside - hammer, spring, sear, trigger, etc.

Please keep those suggestions coming - all are appreciated. And, I wish I could find a community college class - but, my wife and I travel a lot and I have never had time to complete one.

Thanks,
Jacque

smiller6912
05-21-2008, 07:53 AM
This might be a little interesting.................
http://science.howstuffworks.com/flintlock2.htm

S_J_H
05-21-2008, 01:15 PM
I was very fortunate and received these books and mags a few weeks ago from a friend. All like new.
Mags going back to the 80's, machinery's handbook,American machinists handbook,etc ect, more than you can see in the photo.

I have not read them all yet, but Machine tool Practices is a pretty good read. Lot's of photo's and well written. Even has a good shaper section.:D
http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n48/S_J_H/misc/er11spindle001.jpg

Steve

Alistair Hosie
05-21-2008, 05:00 PM
Steve these are too advanced for you send them to me right away and you'll be rewarded in heaven.:DAlistair grrr whay do I never get friends like yours just kidding good luck lucky bugger .Alistair

Michael Edwards
05-21-2008, 06:01 PM
I'm another one in favor of the 2 volume Moltrecht set. That's what I bought when I stared on a lathe and mill. Then when I got my first shaper, I found out that vol 2 has a good bit of info on shapers and tooling for them.

ME

S_J_H
05-21-2008, 08:17 PM
Alistair, ok ah packed an' shipped them out t'yo'. Cain't make haids o' tails outta enny of them, dawgone it! :D

I enjoy reading books, more so the older ones. Of course you need to learn with hands on training first and foremost.

Don't forget that many very good books are available for online download! Some are fascinating especially if you enjoy reading about the history of machines.

There are several sources , this one is pretty good.
http://openlibrary.org/
As an example of what you might find-
A book on historical lathe information that I really enjoyed reading-
http://openlibrary.org/b/OL7071425M

Steve

TexasKnifeMaker
05-21-2008, 09:14 PM
This might be a little interesting.................
http://science.howstuffworks.com/flintlock2.htm
SPOT ON!!
You pointed to chapter 2 - flintlock. Chapter 6 is The Flintlock's Replacement: Percussion Cap
a great place to start - thanks much!
This world is so big and complicated now - so much knowledge learned by man over the years - a lot of the time knowing where to find knowledge is as important as the knowledge itself.

I have marked that page on my list of favorites and will study it thoroughly.

Jacque

hornluv
05-23-2008, 10:52 AM
Another, modern machine shop Vo-Ed textbook that I really like is Richard Kibbe's Machine Tool Practices. The previous two books are 30 and 50 years old, respectively. Kibbe actually has an 8th Edition from 2005 (do people still teach shop class? :)).

The Kibbe book is really good. That's the text for the machine tool classes at my local community college. The only weird thing about it is how it is organized. It covers topics (for instance, threading and thread forms) in several chapters that are widely separated in the book. I found myself hopping around a lot when looking for information.

BTW, I highly recommend looking into your local community college to see if they have an Industrial Technology or Manufacturing Technology program. Most cc's will allow you to take the classes you want without pursuing the degree and it is definitely worth it. There's only so much about machining that you can learn by reading books. I've learned a heck of a lot since I started taking courses. Tuition really isn't all that much either, certainly compared to 4 year schools. I paid $291 a semester to take one 16 week course per semester. $45 of that was the course fee (to cover materials and tooling) and the rest was tuition for 3 credit hours. Once I finished the required projects, which took all of about 3 class periods, I could use the machines to make whatever I wanted for the rest of the class periods as well as open lab times (twice a week for 3 hours). So basically I paid $291 to rent a really nice lathe, mill, and surface grinder, and all the tooling for them, for 16 weeks and learned a bunch of stuff too. Plus, for me, it was all a business expense. My two favorite words in the English language are "Tax deductible." :D

Metalmelter
05-23-2008, 12:17 PM
"Machine Shop Trade Secrets: A Guide to Manufacturing Machine Shop Practices" by James Harvey

http://www.amazon.com/Machine-Shop-Trade-Secrets-Manufacturing/dp/0831132272

I also read this book with much interest. What draws me to the trade is the craftiness with which parts can be made. I would recommend concentrating on doing just one thing for the moment. It can be as simple as tramming a mill or simply using a dial indicator - but do it right! Then build from there because nothing will kill your interest more than frustration (and cheap tools :rolleyes: ).

Machine Tool Practices is good.

The 2 volume Moltrecht set - also good and technical.

"Henry Burghardt's Machine Tool Operation is a Vo-Ed book that is a lot more approachable and down-to-earth, and far less technical than Moltrecht." - I agree and is a good read as well.


I have a few more books I just can't think of at the moment but when I do I'll post them. I just picked up a nice copy of this book: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=350060707064&ssPageName=STRK:MEDW:IT&ih=022
It's an old book but many of the methods haven't changed. Probably worth the $15 I spent on it.

One other place to get your feet wet on is at the smartflix site:
http://smartflix.com/
There's a wealth of info here for rent. The machining section has a bunch of titles to choose from.

Enjoy!!

Chainz
05-23-2008, 01:27 PM
Metalmelter,

I like your site. Just spent the last half hour, that I SHOULD have been in the garage, going through your pages.

Just brought home a Rockwell 14" lathe, and bringing home the B-Port this weekend.

Should have everything I need to get it all up and running.

To all, thanx for all the links to all the education info. In my mind, I will always be a beginner, as there is never an end to learning.

Regards, Chainz

TexasKnifeMaker
05-23-2008, 02:28 PM
Guys - many thanks for your replies. I have done a cut'n'paste of the seven recommendations to this point and emailed them to myself so I can save them. It will make a great shopping list for my birthday, father's day, Christmas, etc. :)

Regards,
Jacque

rantbot
05-23-2008, 03:55 PM
Machine Shop Practice
By: Karl Moltrect
Pub: Industrial Press, 1981
ISBN: 0831111267 (Vol. 1), 0831111321 (Vol. 2)
$20.95 (Vol. 1), $21.95 (Vol. 2)
These are common on eBay. I got the 2nd ed, new condition, for something embarrassing - maybe $5.00 for both volumes.