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KiloBravo
05-25-2008, 09:35 PM
I have been working around my house instead of in my shop :(

Anyway I needed a small push mower to get where the big one don't :)

So, I drag an old Lawn Chief out of the shed. It has been stored for 5 years, not really stored, I just have not used it in 5 years. I dump the old gas out in a container, put fresh in. Then I top of the oil and push the primer ball 10 times.

The dang thing starts on the second pull and runs like a champ.

Not, to mention I left it in the rain for three days, because I figured no way in h#ll it would start anyway. That thing just amazed me.

Regards,
Kevin

garyphansen
05-25-2008, 09:43 PM
I could not even get mine started after I brought it back from the fix it shop. But who cares, for $4.18 a gal. I am not going to cut the grass. The deer need to eat too. Gary P. Hansen

tattoomike68
05-25-2008, 09:57 PM
I have been working around my house instead of in my shop :(

Anyway I needed a small push mower to get where the big one don't :)

So, I drag an old Lawn Chief out of the shed. It has been stored for 5 years, not really stored, I just have not used it in 5 years. I dump the old gas out in a container, put fresh in. Then I top of the oil and push the primer ball 10 times.

The dang thing starts on the second pull and runs like a champ.

Not, to mention I left it in the rain for three days, because I figured no way in h#ll it would start anyway. That thing just amazed me.

Regards,
Kevin

I leave mine out in the rain every time and the air cleaner is a sock wired on. we abuse that craftman and it just wont die. 10 years and we dont show it any love. I am afraid if I changed the oil it would smoke like hell.

That ol POS has paid for itself...

Guido
05-25-2008, 10:44 PM
Was taken aback when some guru mentioned the life expectancy of a small B&S was like, 40 Hours. Could mow grass for half hour per week, 15 weeks each summer, or about 5 years. We've seen many a mower/motor replaced after less than 5 years of use, and the owners tickled pink.

Legitimate auto engines of today are what, 5 to 6000 hours before crushday? The large aircraft radials of WWII were on borrowed time at 1,000 hours. Cat/Cummins diesels, today's warranty, 300K miles?

Gotta pull maintenance, regularly. YMMV

G

KiloBravo
05-25-2008, 11:12 PM
Was taken aback when some guru mentioned the life expectancy of a small B&S was like, 40 Hours. Could mow grass for half hour per week, 15 weeks each summer, or about 5 years. We've seen many a mower/motor replaced after less than 5 years of use, and the owners tickled pink.

Gotta pull maintenance, regularly. YMMV
G

This mower was bought second hand by my father in-law and used for a few years. He moved and gave it to me. I used it regularly for 5 years before I stored it and forgot about it. I got my money out of it. Paid nothing for it and it's still running 10 years later :)

bruto
05-25-2008, 11:38 PM
My mower is an old commercial one with a Wisconsin engine. I got it used about 30 years ago. It has the same engine that once powered the King Midget car: a single cylinder of about 8 horsepower. Roller bearing crankshaft, cast iron block and head, pressure lubrication, external magneto, etc., and when I opened it up last year to repair the governor, I found that the inside of the block was even painted. New roll pin for the flyweights, and it's good to go for another 30 years or so.

barts
05-26-2008, 12:07 AM
I bought my Dad an old Bolens Husky tractor w/ a 14hp Wisconsin motor and Eaton hydrostatic tranny used in the early 90s... it was 20+ years old then, and it has run nicely since then, hauling downed logs, roto-tilling, etc. I have replaced the fuel pump w/ an electric one, and it needed a new carb. float at one point.

Keep good oil in it (say Delo 400 or other diesel rated oil) and they just keep going.... those old engines aren't exactly easy on gas, but when you need the torque, they sure grunt along.

- Bart

Carld
05-26-2008, 01:42 AM
When I had a lawn mower shop I had a customer with four or five sons. They cut grass in the small town we were in and they used the hell out of them mowers. A mower would last them several years. When they started smoking to much I would do a valve and ring job on them and they would run a couple more years. The top and bottom bearings were real loose and I often had to install a bushing in the point plunger.

I did a complete overhaul on one, top and bottom bush, point bush, valve guides, honed .010" over and it didn't last any longer than the simple overhaul.

A Briggs engine is hard to kill and seems to last for ever. If you can find an old cast iron engine it'll last till you die.

JRouche
05-26-2008, 02:04 AM
Engines like to be run. There was a camp up in the Big Bear mountains I used to go to. They had an old chevy 350 running a generator. It ran all day and all night. Charged a battery bank during the night. Thing ran forever, many hours. And a proper maintenance was done on the engine... It loved to run... JR

rws
05-26-2008, 12:49 PM
The one biggest thing I have found that ensures they will start up after storage, is be sure to run it dry of gas before you store it. Especially the two-strokes. Run em dry and they will fire right back up.

Carld
05-26-2008, 01:29 PM
Right you are and I suggest emptying the tank as well. There is always some gas left in the tank when you run the carb dry.

mayfieldtm
05-26-2008, 04:46 PM
I figured no way in h#ll it would start anyway.

Reminds me of the time my big 11 year old Brother dug up a Briggs and Stratton that had been buried in our back yard. I wasn't very old, but, remember kicking the shaft that was sticking up out of the dirt.

I don't know what all he did, but, had it running in a couple of days.

Tom M.

Alistair Hosie
05-26-2008, 05:15 PM
Gary said
But who cares, for $4.18 a gal. I am not going to cut the grass
:Dgary try uk where its approx $12 a gallon:D Alistair

TGTool
05-26-2008, 05:57 PM
My mower ran fine for about 10 years, then one day when I brought it in, shut it off and checked the oil there wasn't a trace of oil in it. Strange, it was fine when I started.

When I pulled the engine out the lower seal was just hanging round the shaft. Caught with its pants around its ankles, in a manner of speaking. No trace of gasket seal on the installation. I reinstalled the seal, but it didn't run long after that before throwing the rod. Sigh.

Walking by a row of tillers last month I saw one had a Honda OHC engine on it. Pretty glorious for a single cylinder utility engine. The other odd design characteristic was that the crankcase was split on the diagonal. What's with that? It makes for queer fixturing, but what's the advantage?

jim davies
05-26-2008, 07:37 PM
The reason is simplified machining. Got the patent for it somewhere...

An interesting thing on Honda piston a/c engine patents [Honda has lotsa patents] is that lots of them show pullrods, not pushrods. Never mentioned in the claims, but it is in the drawings.